Sherman County eNews #194

CONTENT

  1. City of Rufus – Garage/Yard Sale, July 1

  2. Sherman County Swine 4-H Club Notes

  3. Life Jacket Worn, Nobody Mourns

  4. ODOT #Eclipse2017 Update: Plan to have fun; plan ahead, so you will

  5. Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series – Terri Bardenhagen: Quilting

  6. Rep. Greg Walden’s statement on Hanford Site

  7. Preliminary Rate Decisions for 2018 Health Insurance Plans


1. City of Rufus – Garage/Yard Sale, July 1

sign.forsaleSATURDAY, JULY 1ST, 2017

The following citizens are participating in the City of Rufus garage sale:

 

Stephanie Urquhart – 409 Fields St

Sue Jackson – 312 Fields St

Sandy Van Gilder – 501 1st St (J&J Mini Mart) 541-739-2887

Don Arthur – 302 1st St (Blue Shop – Ed’s RV)

Louise Stephens – 317 Murray St

~Aaron Cook, City Recorder – City of Rufus  541-739-2321 rufuscityhall@gmail.com


2. Sherman County Swine 4-H Club Notes

4-H clover1The Sherman County Swine 4-H Club met on June 28 at 6:00pm at the Extension Office.  Attending were Samantha, Emma, Allie, Cadence, Natalie, Austin.  Pledge of Allegiance led by Austin, 4H Pledge by Natalie.  During the meeting we presented presentations, discussed pigs, discussed 4-H camp.  We also talked about raffle prizes and buyers gifts.  Next meeting is undetermined.  Meeting adjourned at 7:00pm.  Signed Cadence Smtih, News Reporter


3. Life Jacket Worn, Nobody Mourns

raindropPORTLAND, Ore. — More public recreation fatalities occur in July than any other month, and so the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Portland District asks you to please play it safe while on, in, or near the water. Drowning is a leading cause of death this time of year, and most people that drown would have survived if they had worn a life jacket.

Here are some more tips to help you have a safe and enjoyable time this summer. Swimming in open water is different and more difficult than in a swimming pool. You can tire more quickly and get into trouble due to changing conditions, waves, current, lack of experience, or exhaustion. While wearing a life jacket you will not use as much energy, it will help you float, and it will be there when and if you ever really need it.

While on or near the water, watch out for each other at all times. It only takes 20 seconds for a child to drown and 60 seconds for an adult to drown. Several people drown every year within 10 feet of safety because the people around them were not paying attention and did not recognize the signs of drowning: head back, mouth open gasping for air, no yelling or sound, and arms slapping the water like they are trying to climb out of the water. Properly rescuing someone should never include contact with them unless you are a trained lifeguard. Reach out to the victim with something to keep your distance, or throw them something that floats to pull them to safety.

Avoid prolonged breath holding activities and games because it can lead to shallow water blackout. Shallow water blackout can affect anyone who is breath-holding, even physically fit swimmers.

Boaters or those swimming near boats should be aware that carbon monoxide is an odorless, invisible, and silent killer. Carbon monoxide can accumulate anywhere in or around your boat. Early symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include eye irritation, headache, nausea, weakness, and dizziness. One breath of carbon monoxide at the water’s surface can cause you to pass out and drown. Avoid areas where exhaust fumes may be present, and do not let anyone swim under or around the boarding platform.

Increased water safety awareness can help ensure that you and your loved ones have fun this summer and return home safely. Always remember to wear a life jacket because it could save your life or the life of someone you love. Life Jackets Worn…Nobody Mourns. Learn more at www.PleaseWearIt.com.


4. ODOT #Eclipse2017 Update: Plan to have fun; plan ahead, so you will 

eclipse3Arrive early, stay put, leave late

Many things will look different on Oregon highways in the days before the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse. And it’s not just because things will be dark for a while mid-day.

ODOT is making some significant changes in highway procedures to help you stay safe and reduce congestion during the #Eclipse2017.

How different? Here are a few things the public will see—or not.

  • Different traffic patterns. Normal travel paths may change. Communities may close streets to through traffic or ban left turns or right turns to keep traffic moving, especially in areas near gatherings with many eclipse visitors. ODOT does not plan to close state highways, but some left turns may be restricted from or to highways.
  • Work zones. All ODOT construction and non-emergency maintenance in the path of totality will shut down Aug. 18-22. In other parts of the state, work will be curtailed depending on expected eclipse traffic impact. But work zones may still have narrow lanes, sharper curves or grooved pavement: Slow down and pay attention in all work zones, active or not!
  • Fewer big trucks. All over-dimension loads are restricted everywhere in Oregon from noon Friday Aug. 18 to Tuesday Aug. 22.
  • Truck scales closed. ODOT truck scales around the state may be used for staging by law enforcement and emergency response vehicles, a way to better speed help to where it’s needed.
  • More signs with advice. You’ll see hundreds of extra roadside readerboards warning you about road issues and reminding you to avoid distractions and be even more careful about fire danger.
  • More ODOT trucks pre-positioned along critical travel routes to keep motorists mobile and safe.
  • www.Tripcheck.com provides you the most current travel information available, using embedded road sensors, other travel data and more than 400 highway cameras. Check up on the traffic on your planned route before leaving home.
  • Things you can’t see. All over the state, ODOT emergency operation centers will be up and running to help law enforcement, fire fighters and emergency medical providers do their jobs and saves lives.

Here are a few ways to tune in to the latest information.

  • Twitter. Follow @oregondot.
  • Facebook. Visit facebook.com/oregondot.
  • 511. The latest traffic information in an audio format.
  • www.oregon.gov/ODOT/Pages/Eclipse.aspx, ODOT’s eclipse webpage, links you to useful information.

Remember, we’re all in this together. Be prepared, help your neighbors and be kind to our visitors.


5. Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series – Terri Bardenhagen: Quilting

m_return
Moro, OR – The Sherman County Historical Museum’s local Artist Series is featuring Quilting by Terri Bardenhagen for the month of July at the Sherman County Historical Museum. Terri has always sewn, learning from her mother at a very early age on the family farm in Grass Valley, Oregon. Through the years Terri has made a lot of the family’s clothing and other fabric crafts and projects but in 1990 on a whim she signed up for a quilting class at her local fabric shop in Corvallis, Oregon, resulting in a couple quilts and she was hooked!

Loving the idea of hand-sewing a quilt she has made full quilts by hand along with learning a variety of quilting techniques and experimenting with more difficult challenges. Terri enjoys choosing the fabrics, making the blocks and putting them together. She ties quilts and machine quilts. Terri gives away most of her projects to friends and family and enjoys making beautiful gifts that will last. Don’t miss her wonderful display this July at the museum.

After viewing Terri’s quilts in the lobby, also view the museum’s vintage quilts on display for the Quilt and Fiber Show in Moro July 1st – 9th. The Sherman County Historical Museum quilts will be on display for the month of July!

There is no charge for this exhibit on display in the lobby of the museum for the month of July. The award-winning Museum in Moro is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through October. The Sherman County Historical Museum is located at 200 Dewey Street in Moro, Oregon. For more information call 541-565-3232.


6. Rep. Greg Walden’s statement on Hanford Site

American flag2WASHINGTON, D.C. — Rep. Greg Walden (R-Hood River), Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, released the following statement on the Department of Energy’s (DOE) structural integrity analysis of the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) tunnels at the Hanford Site. 

“Today’s report is cause for concern and underscores the importance of getting a permanent nuclear waste repository back on track,” said Walden. “Just this week the committee passed bipartisan legislation that would ensure the waste engineered at Hanford is placed safely in a permanent repository at Yucca Mountain. I urge DOE to expeditiously secure and repair the structurally damaged tunnels, and will continue to monitor the situation moving forward.”

For more information on H.R. 3053, the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act, see https://energycommerce.house.gov/news-center/press-releases/energy-and-commerce-advances-eight-bills

To read Rep. Walden’s op-ed in The East Oregonian on nuclear waste and Hanford, see http://www.eastoregonian.com/eo/columnists/20170626/walden-want-to-clean-up-hanford-finish-yucca-mountain


7. Preliminary Rate Decisions for 2018 Health Insurance Plans

Salem — Oregonians can now see the state’s preliminary decisions for rates for 2018 individual and small employer health insurance plans. The Department of Consumer and Business Services, Division of Financial Regulation must review and approve any rates before they can be charged to policyholders.

The preliminary rate decisions are for small businesses and individuals who buy their own coverage rather than getting it through an employer.

In the individual market, the division has issued preliminary decisions for seven companies with average rate changes ranging from a 1.6 percent decrease to a 14.8 percent increase. Under the preliminary decisions, Silver Standard Plan premiums for a 40-year-old in Portland would range from $355 to $452 a month.

“Although rates are still rising for many consumers, the new Oregon Reinsurance Program provides some stability and relief,” said DCBS Director Patrick Allen. “Without this program, Oregonians who buy their own insurance would be seeing much larger rate increases.”

In the small group market, the division has issued preliminary decisions for nine companies with average rate increases ranging from 3.3 percent to 10.1 percent. Under the preliminary decisions, Silver Standard Plan premiums for a 40-year-old in Portland would range from $293 to $421 a month.

See the chart at dfr.oregon.gov/healthrates/Documents/2018-pre-prop-rates.pdf for the full list of preliminary decisions.

Reasons for the rate changes include:
– The new Oregon Reinsurance Program. This program reduced individual market rates by 6 percent, and added a 1.5 percent increase to the small group market.
– Federal weakening of the individual mandate enforcement.
– Medical costs continue to rise, driven by increased use and the cost of new specialized prescription drugs.
– The cost of providing care continues to surpass premiums collected for many carriers.

Developed by the Governor and stakeholders and recently approved by the Legislature, the Oregon Reinsurance Program is designed to stabilize the individual market, reduce rates, and to encourage insurance companies to offer plans in more parts of the state. Reinsurance is a mechanism to spread the risk of high-cost claims so that no one carrier takes on a disproportionate share of this risk.

Rates are required to reflect the average cost of providing health care to a member in Oregon’s health insurance market. The division has determined that the average cost of paying claims in the individual health insurance market in 2016 was $384 per member per month; in 2015, the average cost of paying claims was $385 per member per month. Health insurance companies are required to justify any differences to this average in their rate filings.

These preliminary decisions will undergo continued review and discussion through public hearings being held in Salem and streamed online July 10-11. The public comment period also will remain open through Tuesday, July 11. There will be a dedicated public comment period during each public rate hearing. For a schedule of hearings and to submit comments online, visit www.oregonhealthrates.org.

Final decisions are expected to be announced Thursday, July 20.


 

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Sherman County eNews #193

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County 4-H Horse Club News Report

  2. Sherman 4-H Junior Master Recyclers Day Camp Cancelled

  3. Gilliam County Museum Complex in Condon

  4. Afternoon of Dance and an Evening of Stargazing at Maryhill on July 15

  5. Oregon Heritage Bulletins

  6. Oregon Connections Telecommunications Conference, Oct. 19-20

  7. Sherman County Senior & Community Center July Meal Menu

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County 4-H Horse Club News Report

4-H clover1The horse 4-H club met on June 8, 2017 at 3:30pm at the Extension Office.  Attending were President Mercedez, Vice President Jared, Secretary Bailey, Courtney, Gabe and Lindsey.  Pledges led by Lindsey.  We talked about vaccinations and having your horse shod.  What activities should we do?  Camping trips.  Elected officers (see above).  Our next meeting will be Monday June 19 at 6pm.  Meeting adjourned at 4:32pm.  Signed Bailey Coelsch, News Reporter. 


2. Sherman 4-H Junior Master Recyclers Day Camp Cancelled

Please note that the 4-H Junior Master Recyclers day camp, to be held July 5-7 at the Extension Office, has been cancelled.  Talese Slay and Cindy Brown will consider starting up a club in the fall/winter at the school.

Cindy Brown | Educator, 4-H Youth Development & Healthy Living OSU Extension Service – Sherman County P: 541-565-3230 | C: 541-993-5291

Cindy.Brown@oregonstate.edu

extension.oregonstate.edu/Sherman


3. Gilliam County Museum Complex in Condon

The Gilliam County Museum Complex is open Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 o’clock, just off Highway 19 adjacent to Burns Park. Admission is by donation. Contact 541-384-4233. Follow on Facebook, Gilliam County Historical Museum-Home/facebook.


4. Afternoon of Dance & an Evening of Stargazing at Maryhill on July 15

starsDaytime and evening events on July 15 will bring the grounds of Maryhill Museum of Art to life.  Visitors can learn about modern dance pioneer and Sam Hill’s close friend Loie Fuller during an afternoon program titled Loïe Fuller in the Garden. The event, which takes place from 1 to 6 p.m., includes lectures, performances and hands-on activities for children.

As evening draws near, visitors are invited to stay and watch the stars twinkle overhead during “Starry Night at the Museum,” a campout and stargazing experience on the museum grounds. There is a charge for those who wish to camp and reservations must be made in advance; visitors who wish to stargaze without camping are welcome free of charge. Further details can be found in the schedule below

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS – JULY 15

Saturday, July 15, 2017 | 1 to 6 p.m.
Loïe Fuller in the Garden

Join us for a celebration of modern dance pioneer Loïe Fuller and her influential legacy at Maryhill Museum of Art. Enjoy lectures and performances as well as special hands-on activities and dance for children. The program is organized by Gonzaga University Professor Suzanne Ostersmith, MFA, and her students, and sponsored by Judy Carlson Kelley. 

Hands-On Children’s Activities | 1 to 2:30 p.m., 3 to 4:30 p.m. & 5:30 to 6:45 p.m.
Gonzaga dance students will lead children in creative dance with scarves, coloring images of Loïe Fuller and decorating crowns. Children can also become a living Rodin sculpture along a specially created “dance path.”

Sun-viewing | 2 p.m. onwards
Friends of Goldendale Observatory will be here with special telescopes that allow you to view the sun directly. Takes place outside.

Lecture: Loie Fuller: Influential Star – Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow | 2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m.  Join us for a 20-minute presentation followed by a Q & A with Gonzaga University Professor Suzanne Ostersmith, who will talk about Loïe’s work and how it informed her own recent contemporary work with students at Gonzaga. Takes place in the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center.

Dance Performance | 4:45 p.m. & 7 p.m.
Students from Gonzaga University perform a short dance work choreographed by Suzanne Ostersmith and inspired by Loïe Fuller. Takes place outside.

Saturday, July 15, 2017 | 5 p.m. onwards
Starry Night at the Museum

Join us at Maryhill for a magical overnight campout and stargazing experience in one of the most majestic settings imaginable. Volunteers from Rose City Astronomers will provide telescopes to give visitors awe-inspiring views of the summer night sky. Catch glimpses of the Milky Way, the Andromeda Galaxy, Sagittarius, and even some meteors if we are lucky! Troy Carpenter from the Goldendale Observatory will inspire and inform our special views. Don’t miss this fantastic, family-friendly event!

Cost for Tent or RV Campsite: $50 museum members | $60 non-members. Includes campsite in the gardens at Maryhill, and one (1) free admission to the museum for each member in your party. Tent and RV sites accommodate one tent or RV. Campers provide their own tents and camping gear. No cooking or fires permitted. There are no RV (electrical) hook-ups or showers. Deadline to register for tent or RV site is July 11. 

Visitors who wish to stargaze without camping, are welcome. Stargazing only is FREE on the grounds of the museum.

Register online at www.maryhillmuseum.org/starrynight or register by phone at 509.773.3733 ext. 25.


5. Oregon Heritage Bulletins

wheel.wagon1Heritage Bulletins provide technical information and tips on topics of interest to organizations and individuals involved in heritage. The first list is a complete listing of Heritage Bulletins, followed by groups of Bulletins by topic: Historic Cemeteries, Historic Places, Organizational Support & Collections. Visit http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/Pages/Bulletins.aspx 


6. Oregon Connections Telecommunications Conference, Oct. 19-20

Oregon Connections: Networks of the Future

October 19-20, 2017

Hood River Inn

Keynote Speaker: Futurist, Steve Brown

Early Bird Registration is $65 & ends September 8.

http://www.oregonconnections.info


7. Sherman County Senior & Community Center July Meal Menu

We serve lunch at 12:00 noon sharp.  First come, first served

If you have a group of 2 or more, please let the Kitchen staff know at #565-3191, the day before to ensure that we make enough food to serve!

MEAL PRICING: Under 60 Yrs. $7.00 ~ 60 Yrs. & UP $4.00 suggested donation!

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
3 4 5 6 7
CLOSED TO

CELEBRATE THE

4TH OF JULY!

CLOSED TO

CELEBRATE THE

4TH OF JULY!

Oven Fried Chicken BLT Sandwich Sloppy Joes on a Bun
Mashed Potatoes/Gravy Tater Tots & Veggies Potato  Wedges & Veggies
Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert
10 11 12 13 14
Taco Bar w/Ground Beef Chicken Ranch Wrap Spaghetti w/Meat Sauce Philly Beef Sub Chicken Oriental
Veggies Tater Tots & Veggies Garlic Bread Potato Wedges & Veggies Rice Pilaf & Veggies
Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Ice Cream
17 18 19 20 21
Hot Ham/Cheese on Bun Beef & Bean Burrito Hamburger gravy over Quiche Lorraine Pizza loaded w/Meat
Oven Fries & Veggies Tortilla Chips Mashed Potatoes Muffins Veggies
Green Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert
24 25 26 27 28
Cheeseburgers Chicken Strips Meatloaf Egg Salad or Tuna Salad Ham Fried Rice
Oven Fries & Veggies Tater Tots & Veggies Mashed Potatoes/Gravy Sandwich Egg Rolls
Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad, Ice Cream
31 MENU SUBJECT TO CHANGE DUE TO AVAILABILITY — ATTENTION:  For those who have food allergies, be aware that a large variety of food is prepared in the kitchen.  Therefore, meals may be prepared with ingredients and food service equipment may come in contact with ingredients to which you may have an allergic reaction, such as nuts.
Clam Chowder
Cottage Cheese & Rolls
Veggies, Salad & Dessert

8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do 

BeeAfter missing 19 Fridays, Oregon lawmakers will work weekend, July 4

The Daily Signal

 Auscrete Corporation and Goldendale, Washington

Wagon Train Adventures

 

The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

Who We Are As a People—The Syrian Refugee Question

 

US sets up court in Oregon forest for major gathering

Dozens of Oregon children still staying in hotels while awaiting foster care

Oregon Electric Byways

Vocational Ed, Reborn

Sherman County eNews #192

CONTENT

  1. Classifieds

  2. Calendar


1. Classifieds (new or corrected)

newsletter2FRIDAY CLASSIFIEDS:

Please note: Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and contact information, under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory notes and Joyful News here. ~ The Editor

applause1THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

COMMENDABLE! 35th Year! The Sherman County Historical Society’s Editorial Team put Sherman County: For The Record, Vol. 35, No. 1, in the mail to members this week. Gladys Wesley, Editor, her editorial team — Terri Bibby, Dorothy Benson, Lowell Smith, Janet Pinkerton, Nancy Allen and Sheri Carlson, and authors for this edition – Terri Bibby, Keith Mobley, Eilene Eslinger, Leta Ann Eslinger Reckmann, Amber Tilton, Sherry Kaseberg, Dorothy Coyle Blagg, Jean Zevely Anderson, and Bud Root, are to be commended for continued preservation of local stories, records and photographs. Get your copy by contacting Sherman County Historical Society, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 or info@shermanmuseum.org or at the Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro! 10% discount for members.

Gratitude can transform common days into thanksgivings, turn routine jobs into joy, and change ordinary opportunities into blessings. —William Arthur Ward

JOYFUL NEWS! [births, birthdays, engagements, weddings & anniversaries]

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

THE MUSEUM STORE. “Pigs to Politics” by Bev Clarno $29.95. Museum members receive a 10% discount. The national award-winning Sherman County Historical Museum is open daily 10-5 May through October in Moro, Oregon. ~Cris Welk, The Museum Store

OUR COMMUNITY SERVICES. Often we forget that someone else’s grandparents paid for our education….thru taxes, and with their contributions and labor for our community services such as churches and cemeteries. Three of the local cemeteries remind me that I can help maintain those services for my family and my friends. Thanks for those reminders.  When my children were young, lower income and higher expenses made it hard to be generous.  As a grandmother, I want to support these things for my family and friends. Keep up the good work. As a non-helping senior I and my friends should be willing to participate in this small manner! ~Nell Melzer

EMPLOYMENT:

MCP logo smallPART-TIME RETAIL SALES ASSOCIATE. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a part time retail sales associate.  Our Farm Stores sell a variety of products from animal food and supplies, fencing and automotive products to household items and clothing.  This position will be based out of The Dalles, Oregon.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities include but are not limited to:

  • Cashier-Process customer orders
  • Maintenance of the facilities
  • Sell products and provide product information
  • Carry out and load farm store merchandise
  • Stock Farm Store with merchandise warehoused or stored in the lot or warehouse
  • Clean and rearrange merchandise as needed
  • Open and close store, lot and warehouse areas
  • Pick up orders from vendors
  • Deliver merchandise to Farm Store customers
  • Load and unload bales of straw, hay and feed

Requirements:

  • Lift, carry, push, or pull objects up to approximately 100 lbs.
  • Must possess basic computer knowledge and be able to navigate with little assistance
  • Must be able to accommodate a varying work schedule
  • Operate with initiative, commitment, strong work ethic & sense of urgency
  • Accurate and comfortable with math and currency
  • Valid Driver’s License
  • Must be able to operate a vehicle with a GVW of 10,000 lbs. or more, with or without a trailer in tow
  • Will be required to work in all weather conditions

Schedule:
Schedule varies, store hours of operation will be Monday – Saturday 7:30 – 5:30.  Shifts are assigned as deemed necessary.

Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR.

Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com  or be picked up at the main office in Moro.  Please send cover letter, application and resume to: Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039

PH: (541)565-2277      Fax: (503)536-6875 Brittany@mcpcoop.com

Closing Date: July 8th, 2017, or Until Filled.  0/0

MCP logo smallGRAIN FACILITIES OPERATOR. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a Grain Facilities Operator.  This full time position will be based in either Sherman or Gilliam County.  The role of a Grain Facilities Operator is to safely handle grain while rendering outstanding customer service to our patrons.  As an MCP employee you will have the opportunity to perform a wide variety of jobs within the department. The Facilities Operator holds the primary responsibility for the facility under their operation.  Daily functions include and are not limited to grain elevator operation, maintenance, housekeeping, receiving grain, loading barges, inventory management and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility.

Preferred:

  • Mechanical inclination, to be able to troubleshoot work on minor repairs
  • Grain and/or Seed Industry knowledge

Required:

  • Ability to work well under pressure and deal tactfully with others
  • Able to conform to shifting priorities, responsibilities, strategies, demands and timelines
  • Strong personal and customer service skills. Good verbal and written communication skills
  • Must be able to climb ladders and work at heights up to 200 ft.
  • Periodically perform heavy labor
  • Be able to qualify for use of a dust and mist respirator
  • Valid Driver’s license
  • The ability to obtain a chemical applicators license with space fumigation endorsement

Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR.  — As a prominent agribusiness company, we offer a competitive salary and benefits package. Including health insurance premiums currently paid 100% for the employee and their dependents, dental, vision and Rx coverage, 401k with company match, robust profit sharing plan, paid vacation, sick, holidays, and more.  Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Open Until Filled. Please send cover letter, application and resume to: Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039

Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277  Brittany@mcpcoop.com

Mid Columbia Producers is an equal opportunity employer. 0/0

MCP logo smallGRAIN OPERATIONS LABORER. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a Grain Operations Laborer.  This full time position will be based in either Sherman or Gilliam County.  The role of a Grain Operations Laborer is to safely handle grain while rendering outstanding customer service to our patrons.  As an MCP employee you will have the opportunity to perform a wide variety of jobs within the department. Including but not limited to maintenance, housekeeping, inventory management and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility.

Preferred:

  • Mechanical inclination, to be able to troubleshoot work on minor repairs
  • Grain and/or Seed Industry knowledge

Required:

  • Ability to work well under pressure and deal tactfully with others
  • Able to conform to shifting priorities, responsibilities, strategies, demands and timelines
  • Strong personal and customer service skills. Good verbal and written communication skills
  • Must be able to climb ladders and work at heights up to 200 ft.
  • Periodically perform heavy labor
  • Be able to qualify for use of a dust and mist respirator
  • Valid Driver’s license

Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR.

As a prominent agribusiness company, we offer a competitive salary and benefits package. Including health insurance premiums currently paid 100% for the employee and their dependents, dental, vision and Rx coverage, 401k with company match, robust profit sharing plan, paid vacation, sick, holidays, and more.

Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Open Until Filled. Please send cover letter, application and resume to: Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039

Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277 Brittany@mcpcoop.com

Mid Columbia Producers is an equal opportunity employer.  0/0

WEED CONTROL TECHNICIANS (2). The Sherman County Weed District is looking to fill 2 positions: Weed Control Technicians. These are full-time, seasonal positions with no benefits, $15.43/hour. Primary duties include: Surveying fields and canyons and identification of targeted noxious weeds; Marking, mapping and documenting data; servicing and repairing equipment. Weed Technicians will work outside, in the environment in all weather and in rough terrain.   Snakes and ticks are not uncommon within the project area.  The technicians will work as part of a team in Sherman County. Experience in operating off-road vehicles, pulling a trailer and use of GPS data is a plus. For more information and to receive an application, contact Rod Asher at 541-980-4345 or rasher@shermancounty.net

Sherman County Weed District, 66365 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR 97039 – Applications due by June 16th, 2017, or until filled.  0/0

sign.forsale

FOR SALE:

ACREAGE. A chance to own 1.5 acres close to Moro but still in the country. All utilities are available. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. $55,000 RMLS# 17410095 tiffany@drysideproperty.com 7/14

HOUSE IN WASCO. 4 bedroom, 2 bath house with extended lot for RV or garden, 2 car garage, workshop in basement. 2 bedrooms on main floor, 2 large bedrooms on upper floor. Many recent inside improvements. $115,000 by owners. Shown by appointment. 541-467-2345  7/14

CONTINUING USED BOOK SALE at Wasco Annex (old grade school) in Wasco, Oregon. Used books only $5.00 per bag; books on tape, music cassettes and  VHS movies for 25 cents.  Stock up and give for gifts. All funds used for the purchase of new items for the library. ~ Danee Rankin, Librarian, Wasco City Community Library. 7/14

SERVICES: [home, personal, appliance, landscape, fencing, cleaning, maintenance, janitorial, computer, construction, sewing, repairs, transportation, media, preschool, day care, restaurant, support & training]

DISCOUNTED PHOTO SESSIONS. It’s not too early to get senior photos taken care of! Do you want your senior pictures in or around the wheat fields or to include them as a part of your photo session? If so act now before harvest starts! I’m offering $25.00 off a photo session (senior, family, couple, etc.) between now and the start of harvest. Contact me soon to get a discounted rate and get a photo session completed before harvest starts. ~ Jeremy Lanthorn  JeremyLanthorn.com  Jlanthorn@gmail.com (541) 993-2446   (541) 333-2013  7/28

OREGON HERITAGE BULLETINS provide technical information and tips on topics of interest to organizations and individuals involved in heritage. The first list below is a complete listing of Heritage Bulletins, followed by groups of Bulletins by topic: Historic Cemeteries, Historic Places, Organizational Support & Collections. Visit Oregon Heritage Bulletins 7/21

CAREGIVER AVAILABLE. Would you like some help with meal preparation, light housekeeping, transportation, etc.? I am a caring and honest woman with excellent references.  ~Synoma Olsen 541 993-6924  7/28

CANES & WALKERS. Wasco Methodist Church has a supply of canes and walkers that may be used at no charge.  The church will accept donations of any devices that would be helpful to people with limited mobility.  Please contact 541-442-5446 for more info. 7/28

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION SERVICES & EVENTS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

m_returnSHARE YOUR STORIES: JOHN DAY DAM, RAILROADS, HIGHWAYS & BRIDGES. Did you or someone in your family come to this area to build the John Day Dam or the railroads and freeway? Sherman County Historical Society’s editor for Sherman County: For The Record, Gladys Wesley, is interested in your story! In 2018, it will be 60 years since construction began in 1958. What effect did it have on Sherman County, the schools and housing? Were you the new kid in school? Do you have photographs to illustrate your stories? The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has the material facts. Only you can tell your story! Sherman County: For The Record will feature the John Day Dam next year. Please contact Gladys Wesley at moroglad@embarqmail.com or Sherman County Historical Society at info@shermanmuseum.org.

SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR BOARD. Sherman County Fair Board is accepting letters of interest for a board position.  Letters should include your experience with our or other county fairs, how you have been involved or have helped out at a fair and the number of years, other community involvement, and your areas of strengths to contribute to our team. Requirements include Sherman County residency, attendance at monthly board meetings, committing to extra time and work days in August, and additional work days, meetings and trainings as they happen.  Send your letter to Sherman County Fair, P.O. Box 45  Wasco, OR  97065 or to shermanctyfair@hotmail.com to be received by July2nd.  Monthly board meetings are held on the first Thursday of the month.  Contact the Fair Board Secretary with questions and for further information @ shermanctyfair@hotmail.com or 541-980-1821.  6/30

WANTED:

m_returnYOUR STORIES: JOHN DAY DAM, RAILROADS, HIGHWAYS & BRIDGES. Did you or someone in your family come to this area to build the John Day Dam or the freeway? Sherman County Historical Society’s editor for Sherman County: For The Record, Gladys Wesley, is interested in your story! In 2018, it will be 60 years since construction began in 1958. What effect did it have on Sherman County, the schools and housing? Were you the new kid in school? Do you have photographs to illustrate your stories? The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has the material facts. Only you can tell your story! Sherman County: For The Record will feature the John Day Dam next year. Please contact Gladys Wesley at moroglad@embarqmail.com or Sherman County Historical Society at info@shermanmuseum.org.

HOST FAMILIES FOR HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUDENTS.  Non-Profit Seeks Local Host Families for High School Exchange Students. ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with your community high school, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few. — ASSE students are enthusiastic and excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience. — The exchange students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests. — To become an ASSE Host Family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call the ASSE Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or go to www.host.asse.com to begin your host family application. Students are eager to learn about their American host family, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter today! — ASSE INTERNATIONAL (FORMERLY AMERICAN SCANDINAVIAN STUDENT EXCHANGE) IS A NON-PROFIT, PUBLIC BENEFIT ORGANIZATION.  ASSE IS OFFICIALLY DESIGNATED AS AN EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM BY THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, WAS FOUNDED BY THE SWEDISH MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, COOPERATES WITH THE CANADIAN PROVINCIAL MINISTRIES OF EDUCATION,  and the NEW ZEALAND DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 7/28 

FREE: 

LOST OR FOUND:

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

DUPLEX. One bedroom apartment. Located in scenic Grass Valley oregon. Locaterd 55 miles south east of The Dalles. 470 Sq ft. One bathroom. Older style home. Off street parking with views of the town and country. First, last and deposit. No pets. Garbage and water included in rent. $450. Text for pics or a tour. Looking forward to hearing from you. Eric Whitley. 541999517.  6/30


2. Calendar (new or corrected)

JUNE

30-July 2 Wheeler County Bluegrass Festival 

American flag2JULY

1 First Saturday—Artist of the Month 10-3 Second Hand Made, Wasco

1 Demolition Derby – Goldendale

1 City-wide Garage & Yard Sale in Rufus 541-739-2321

1 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

1-4 Condon’s Fabulous Fourth of July Celebration

1 Harvesters’ Classic Softball Tournament 19 Condon

1 Cruz-In Car Show & Bluegrass Festival in Fossil

1-9 Experience Moro’s Quilt & Fiber Arts Displays & Activities

2 Dave Barnett Memorial Golf Tournament 10 Condon

2 Gilliam County Historical Society Depot Museum 1-5 Condon

3 4-Wheeler Rodeo 12 Fairgrounds in Condon

3 Artisans’ Market 4-7 Condon City Park

3 Paradise Rose Chuckwagon Dinner 5-8 Condon

3 Sherman County Courthouse will be closed.

3 Summer Concert in Condon, Countryfied & Fireworks 6:30-9:90

4 INDEPENDENCE DAY

4 Breakfast in the Park, Windmill Classic Run, Program 8 & Parade 12, Condon

5 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Grass Valley Baptist Church

5 Sherman County Court 9

5 Gilliam County Court 10

5 Wheeler County Court 10

7-9 Caledonian Games, Athena http://www.athenacaledoniangames.org

9 Book Presentation: “Pigs to Politics” by Bev Clarno 2-4 Wasco Annex

9 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Celebration 1-4 Sorosis Park, The Dalles

11 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30 Moro

11 Sherman County Watershed Council Meeting 11:30 Burnet Building, Moro

12 Sherman Senior & Community Center Advisory Group 12:30 Senior Center

15 Afternoon of Dance and an Evening of Stargazing at Maryhill Museum

19 Sherman County Court 9

20 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Facility Board Meeting 10 The Dalles

21 Frontier TeleNet Board Meeting 9 NCESD Building, Condon

24-28 4-H Healthalicious Cooking Workshops 9-1 Sherman Extension Office

25 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board 1-3 The Dalles

26 Tri-County Courts’ Meeting 10 Wheeler County (Sherman, Gilliam, Wheeler) 

Sun-SoleAUGUST

2 Sherman County Court 9

2 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Rufus Baptist Church

4 Summer Concert in Condon, Buffalo Kin 6:30-9:90

5 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

8 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30 Moro

8 Sherman County Watershed Council 11:30 Burnet Building

8 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

8 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

9 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30 Senior Center

12-13 Equine Mania 2-Man Advanced Cow Sorting Clinic, Wasco

16 Sherman County Court 9

18-22 Outlaw Rodeo Bible Camp – Powell Butte, Oregon

19-20 Special Art Walk & Farmers’ Market 10-5

20 Total Solar Eclipse Party in Condon featuring Brewers Grade
         Camping, Food, Beer & Wine http://www.co.gilliam.or.us/

21 Total Solar Eclipse

22-27 Sherman County Fair

26 Summer Concert in Condon, HYATUS 6:30-9:30

27 Demolition Derby, Sherman County Fair

28 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority 11 The Dalles

SEPTEMBER

2 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

4 LABOR DAY

6 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Moro Presbyterian Church

10 GRANDPARENTS’ DAY

11 PATRIOT DAY

22 Autumn Begins 

OCTOBER

4 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Wasco Church of Christ

7 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

9 COLUMBUS DAY

19-20 Oregon Connections Telecommunications Conference, Hood River

31 HALLOWEEN


 

Sherman County eNews #191

CONTENT

  1. Wheeler County Bluegrass Festival June 30-July 2

  2. 13th Annual Fossil Cruz-In, July 1

  3. Condon’s Fabulous 4th of July Celebration, July 1-4

  4. 4th of July Safety Tips from the Red Cross

  5. Frontier entities approve budgets, hear of resignation, note retirement

  6. Oregon Public Meetings Law: Media Representation at Executive Session


1. Wheeler County Bluegrass Festival June 30-July 2

Bluegrass Festival in Fossil, Oregon

June 30-July 2

music.notes (2)

Friday Kick-off Parade at 2

Music – Song Contest – Workshops – Jamming – Camping

http://www.wheelercountybluegrass.org


2. 13th Annual Fossil Cruz-In, July 1 

Fossil Cruz-In

cargreencoupe

Saturday, July 1  9-4 o’clock

‘50s & ‘60s music by Frank Carlson

Rod McGuire & Paradise Rose Chuckwagon


3. Condon’s Fabulous 4th of July Celebration, July 1-4

fireworks1Saturday, July 1

–Harvesters’ Classic Softball Tournament 10 a.m.

Sunday, July 2

–Dave Barnett Memorial Two Man Scramble 8 a.m.

Monday, July 3

–Four-wheeler Rodeo 12 Fairgrounds

–Atisans’ Market 4-7 City Park

–Paradise Rose Chuckwagon BBQ Dinner 5-8

–Summer Concert in the Park 7

–Fireworks 10

Tuesday, July 4

–Community Breakfast 7:30-10

–Windmill Classic Walk/Run 8

–Morning Program 9

–Library Book Sale 10-2

–Hula Hoop Contest 10:30

–Lunch with Paradise Rose Chuckwagon

–Parade 12 noon

–Sidewalk Chalk Art, Soapbox Derby & Tricycle Races

–Free Swimming 1-4

–Kids’ Games on the Field 4

–Grand Marshal Reception 5-7


4. 4th of July Safety Tips from the Red Cross

arrow-rightPORTLAND, Ore., June 28, 2017 — For many in the Northwest, the 4th of July holiday means enjoying the great outdoors, cook-outs with family and friends and fireworks celebrations. But festivities this holiday weekend can also come with risks.

Since June 1, the local Red Cross has responded to help 215 people displaced by 56 separate fire incidents, several of which fire officials believe were started by fireworks or a BBQ.

The American Red Cross encourages people to follow these safety and fire prevention steps to stay safe over the 4th of July and throughout the summer months.

FIREWORKS SAFETY. The best way to enjoy fireworks is to attend a public fireworks show put on by professionals. Here are five safety steps for people setting fireworks off at home:
1. Never give fireworks to small children, and always follow the instructions on the packaging.
2. Keep a supply of water close by as a precaution.
3. Make sure the person lighting fireworks always wears eye protection.
4. Light only one firework at a time and never attempt to relight a “dud.”
5. Never throw or point a firework toward people, animals, vehicles, structures or flammable materials.

GRILLING SAFETY. Every year people are injured while using charcoal or gas grills. Here are several steps to safely cook for a backyard barbecue:
1. Always supervise a barbecue grill when in use.
2. Never grill indoors–not in the house, camper, tent or any enclosed area.
3. Make sure everyone, including the pets, stays away from the grill.
4. Keep the grill out in the open, away from the house, the deck, tree branches or anything that could catch fire.
5. Use long-handled tools especially made for cooking on the grill.

HIKING SAFETY. If your holiday plans include exploring the great outdoors, make sure to look over these tips to hike safely:

  1. First, ensure that you and your family are weather aware. Read, watch or listen to the local news for an up-to-date forecast.
    -Know local weather patterns and pack appropriate clothing for the conditions.
    -Plan for your turnaround times–the amount of time you need to get back before darkness.
    -Share your destination point with a family member or friend.
  2. Make a family plan.
    -Discuss with family members the precautions they should take to stay safe along the trails
    -Plan how to adjust your activities to avoid strenuous exercise during the warmest part of the day.
    -Drink water ahead of time and during your activities to avoid dehydration.
    -If you hike with your pets, ensure that your animals’ needs for water and shade are met.
  3. Safety is always a concern while outdoors; bring a first aid kit and an emergency supplies kit that includes the following items:
    -Bandages, Alcohol-based hand sanitizer,Tissues, Ibuprofen, Water or sports drinks with electrolytes
  4. Make sure you have the skills you need for your camping or hiking adventure. You may need to know how to read a compass, make a temporary shelter or deliver first aid.
  5. It’s safest to hike or camp with at least one companion. If you’ll be entering a remote area, your group should have a minimum of four people.
  6. Some areas require you to have reservations or certain permits. If an area is closed, there’s a reason, so don’t go there. Find out in advance about any regulations — there may be specific guidelines about wildlife.

    RED CROSS EMERGENCY APPS: People can download the free, all-inclusive Red Cross Emergency app which combines more than 35 separate emergency alert systems; expert first aid and medical advice; and preparedness tips for numerous emergency situations. Users can find the free app in smartphone app stores by searching for the American Red Cross or going to redcross.org/apps. This app is available in multiple languages.


5. Frontier entities approve budgets, hear of resignation, note retirement

~By permission of the Times-Journal in which it was published on June 22, 2017.

Directors of Frontier Digital Network and Frontier Telenet, both ORS 190 entities administered by the judges of Sherman, Gilliam and Wheeler counties, approved budgets for the 2017-2018 fiscal year when they met last Friday, June 16, in Condon.

Judge Gary Thompson of Sherman County chaired the meetings in the physical absence of Judge Steve Shaffer who had been called away, but who participated in the meetings by phone.  Wheeler County Judge Lynn  Morley was also present.

Also present at the meetings were Rob Myers, Frontier Digital/Frontier Telenet manager; Mike Smith, Frontier Telenet marketing manager; Jeanne Burch, staff; Ryan LeBlanc, Todd Cox, Garrett Winter and Steve Wynne of Day Wireless; Ron Spencer of Motorola Solutions; and Will Carey, attorney for Frontier Digital and Frontier Telenet, and several in the audience.

The budget hearing was opened, but no further discussion or public comment was offered on the proposed budget of Frontier Digital Network and the public hearing was closed.

After approving the minutes of the board’s Feb. 24 meeting and the current financials, the board’s discussion turned to a discussion of the system upgrade agreement with Motorola Solutions.  Motorola’s Garrett Winter reported that the Frontier Digital Network’s system has been upgraded as needed through the current four-year agreement and is “run as good as any system around.”

Ron Spencer, regional accounts manager for Motorola Solutions, commended Frontier Digital Network on its state of the art system, then discussed aspects of the proposed new four-year system upgrade agreement. The 2014 agreement, which was for $770,000, will conclude at the fiscal end of 2017. The new four-year agreement calls for $230,000 a year, and provides for continual system upgrades with the “most current Motorola equipment.”

Day-to-day maintenance and technical support on the system will continue to be provided by Day Wireless, work that is done separate from the Motorola contract. Frontier Digital Network directors agreed to have legal counsel review the agreement and make a final decision on the agreement at the board’s Friday, July 21, 9 a.m. meeting. Board members voted unanimously to approve the Frontier Digital Network budget that had been proposed for the 2017-2018 fiscal year in the amount of $391,000.

The Frontier Digital Network budget hearing and meeting was followed by a budget hearing and meeting of Frontier Telenet.

A brief discussion during the budget hearing was centered on the $900,000 that the federal government is in arrears for e-rate payments; and the movement of $53,000 from the Contingency Fund to Personal Services to cover the marketing director personal services contract, leaving $477,227 in the Contingency Fund. No public comment was provided in regards to the Frontier Telenet budget.

         As the regular Frontier Telenet board meeting began, staff Jeanne Burch referenced an op-ed piece in the June 15 issue of the Times-Journal authored by Sherry Kaseberg of Wasco and tendered her resignation, saying “enough is enough.” Burch was Wheeler Co. Judge when the Frontier Digital, Frontier Telenet and Frontier Regional 911 entities were created and has for the last few years served as staff, taking minutes, preparing the budgets and keeping records. She indicated she would complete the budget process and prepare the audit material.

         Attorney Will Carey recommended to the board that the statements made in Kaseberg’s comments should be responded to. From the audience, Pat Shaw indicated her displeasure with those who do not support the efforts of Frontier Telenet. Shaw, a former judge of Gilliam County, sat on the board of Frontier Telenet during her tenure as judge.

         By phone, Judge Shaffer indicated that “there are some things we need to work on. I take responsibility for organizational things, but there is nothing underhanded or sneaky going on. I feel we do need to take some steps to look at what we do.”

         The discussion continued noting the accomplishments and successes of Frontier Telenet and associated entities in establishing the 911 emergency call center, which now serves four counties.

         Judge Shaffer had apparently earlier contacted the Association of Oregon Counties for assistance, and asked for, and received by consensus, board approval to continue working with AOC.

         With brief further discussion regarding the proposed budget, directors unanimously approved the 2017-2018 budget in the amount of $2,660,758.

         The board took no action on Burch’s announcement of her resignation.

         In regards to a discussion on the development of Frontier Telenet’s contracting and procurement rules, board members approved requesting the services of Speer Hoyt LLC in Eugene to assist in the development of Frontier Telenet’s contracting and procurement policies, with a cost capped at $500.

         In discussing a proposed Records Request Policy, a motion to approve the policy as proposed was withdrawn after resident Les Ruark pointed out that the policy proposal, any policy proposal, should be made available to the public before the board makes a public decision on it. Discussion followed noting that news media and all who have requested information prior to board meetings should receive the information that will be discussed at a board meeting at the same time it is distributed to board members.

         “The link between government entities and the public bodies they serve is what is important,” Ruark said. “Getting the information to the public is important in that it would make your (referring to board members) job easier, because people could educate themselves.”

         A decision on the policy adoption will be taken up at the board’s next meeting.

         Wheeler County Judge Lynn Morley began a discussion on the meetings held in Wheeler Co. regarding expanding Frontier Telenet’s wireless communications system.

         “Nobody said it was better than fiber,” Judge Morley said, but noted that the county was receiving pressure to use the grant funding that had been approved earlier, and that the fiber that was proposed from Arlington to Condon to Fossil hasn’t materialized yet.

         Judge Morley said the Wheeler Co. Court had voted to proceed with the wireless system to expand broadband in Wheeler County.

         Frontier Telenet marketing director Mike Smith added issues considered in moving Wheeler County towards its decision to use the wireless microwave system included difficulty, i.e., high costs, terrain, etc., in getting fiber optics throughout the county, the $2 million in grant funding would provide up to a ‘gig’ of broadband to each community as well as improve emergency services communications, and a proven entity in Day Wireless already experienced in maintaining the wireless system.

         Mike Smith reported on the matter of developing a tower site that will serve the Cottonwood Canyon State Park area. He said Frontier Telenet has secured the site with approval from the landowner, negotiations are continuing with the state in regards to equipment for the site, and, while a 40-foot tower is available, an 80-100-foot tower is needed. The project is on-going.

         Board members also:

— discussed a change in the contract with Light Speed Network, but needed more information.

— heard that work continues on a draft agreement between Frontier Regional 911 and the Burns Paiute Tribe for services to be provided by the local emergency call center.

— heard that funding had been placed in the new budget for increases in Frontier Telenet’s personal services contracts, but the matter was postponed to the July meeting as it had not been discussed or agreed upon by the board.

— heard Les Ruark ask about the time-table and process including performance review and discussion of renewal for the personal services contract with Mike Smith, and succession planning in view of the retirement of Rob Myers. It was noted that Myers’ position will not be filled.

— heard Ruark ask about the reconfiguration of ORS 190 entities following the extraction of North Central ESD from the management infrastructure of the entities.

— heard Ruark ask about the recent Oregon Government Ethics Commission decision to fine Frontier Telenet $1,750 for failing to file reports with the state for the last three quarters of 2016 and the first quarter of 2017 – who is responsible and who will pay the fine? Board members appeared to have no knowledge of an Ethics Commission fine.

— heard Ruark commend Jeanne Burch on her longstanding efforts in public service, and encourage the continued involvement by Association of Oregon Counties in guiding the Frontier Telenet processes.

         Just prior to the meeting’s adjournment, Steve Wynne and Ryan LeBlanc, of Day Wireless, presented Rob Myers with a plaque, in recognition of his retirement, in appreciation for working with him for several years on Frontier Telenet and Frontier Digital Network projects

         The next meeting of the directors of Frontier Digital Network and Frontier Telenet will be Friday, July 21, 9 a.m. at the North Central ESD Building in Condon.


6. Oregon Public Meetings Law: Media Representation at Executive Session

~ http://www.doj.state.or.us/public_records/manual/pages/public_meetings.aspx

II.E.4. Media Representation at Executive Session

For many years, the common practice of many public bodies was to permit members of the media to attend executive sessions, subject to the understanding that the media representatives would not report certain sensitive matters. The principal purpose of this practice was to provide news representatives the opportunity to obtain, from their attendance at executive sessions, background information that would improve their understanding of final decisions, and consequently, their ability to keep the public better informed.

The Public Meetings Law now expressly provides that representatives of the news media shall be allowed to attend all executive sessions except in two situations: executive sessions involving deliberations with persons designated to carry on labor negotiations,[351] and closed sessions held under ORS 332.061(2) to consider expulsion of an elementary or secondary school student or matters pertaining to a student’s confidential medical records. ORS 192.660(4).

When an executive session is held for the purpose of conferring with counsel about current litigation or litigation likely to be filed, the governing body must exclude any member of the news media from attending the executive session if the member of the news media is a party to the litigation to be discussed or is an employee, agent or contractor of a news media organization that is a party to the litigation. ORS 192.660(5).

The governing body may require that specified information not be disclosed. ORS 192.660(4). See Sample Script at p. K-9. The presiding officer should make the specification, or the governing body could do so (or overrule the presiding officer) by motion. Absent any such specification, the entire proceeding may be reported and the purpose for having an executive session may be frustrated. Except in the rarest instances, the governing body at least should allow the general subject of the discussion to be disclosed, and it cannot prevent discussion of the statutory grounds justifying the session. The nondisclosure requirement should be no broader than the public interest requires.

Although we explain above that members of the public may tape record or video record public meetings, we do not believe this is the case with respect to members of the media who attend executive sessions. We believe the presiding officer may require that members of the media not tape record executive session proceedings, in order to decrease the likelihood that information discussed in the executive session will be inadvertently disclosed.

The term “representatives of the news media” is not defined. We have interpreted that term to include news-gathering representatives of institutionalized news media that ordinarily report activities of the body.[352] This interpretation should be expanded to include representatives of media that ordinarily report to the general public on matters of the nature under consideration by the body.

The advertising manager of a newspaper is not a representative of the newspaper for purposes of this statute, and a periodical containing only hunting and fishing news is not a medium of news about a meeting of a school board. The hunting and fishing periodical presumably would be a news medium, under the statute, for purposes of a meeting of the Fish and Wildlife Commission.

Current technologies make it easy to disseminate information to a potentially broad audience. Bloggers and others using these technologies sometimes seek to attend executive sessions, asserting that they are “representatives of the news media.” An individual may be a representative of the news media” even if he or she does not work for traditional print media.  The law does not establish bright lines regarding publication schedule, the size of the media organization, or audience size.  A decision whether such an individual should be permitted to attend an executive session must be made on a case-by­-case basis as no clear definition of “news media” exists. We encourage public bodies to consult with their legal counsel when faced with this type of request.

The Public Meetings Law provides no sanction to enforce the requirement that specified information not be disclosed by a news representative. Any penalty for publication would raise freedom of press and speech questions.[353] The experience of more than three decades has been that the media, by and large, honor the nondisclosure requirement. Ultimately, “enforcement” of the nondisclosure requirement depends upon cooperation between public officials and the media. This cooperation advances the purposes of both government and the news media.

A news reporter has no obligation to refrain from disclosing information gathered at an executive session if the governing body fails to specify that certain information is not for publication.[354] Media representatives may wish, in a spirit of cooperation, to inquire whether a governing body’s failure to specify was an oversight. A reporter is under no obligation to keep confidential any information the reporter independently gathers as the result of leads obtained in an executive session. A news reporter has a clear right to disclose any matter covered in an executive session that is not properly within the scope of the announced statutory authorization of the executive session. Indeed, the presence of news media representatives at executive sessions probably encourages compliance with statutory restrictions on the holding of closed sessions.

It is questionable whether a news media representative can be barred from future executive sessions for improperly revealing information obtained at a prior closed session. In a case called to our attention, a reporter and all other representatives of the employing newspaper were threatened with exclusion from future executive sessions for reporting deliberations on a matter that was probably not a proper subject of an executive session. Exclusion or the threat of exclusion in such a case is clearly impermissible.

It is certainly reasonable for a governing body to request a news medium not to assign a particular representative to cover meetings of the body if the representative has irresponsibly violated a clearly valid nondisclosure requirement. An outright ban on a particular individual may be enforceable in such a case, because the statutory purposes will be met by allowing another representative (and representatives of other news media) to attend. However, we can say no more than it is possible that a ban would be enforced in these circumstances. We see no other basis for a governing body to dictate the assignments of a news medium representative. A particular representative certainly could not be banned from meetings simply because the governing body disliked the reports made by the representative.


 

Sherman County eNews #190

CONTENT

  1. Join us for a Maker Fun Factory Picnic in the Park

  2. Letter to the Editor: Thanks for the Opportunity to Give

  3. Oregon’s Top Ten Agricultural Products

  4. Oregon Department of Transportation’s New Website

  5. Time Alone Just to Think

  6. New School Board Members: 7 Signs of Effective School Board Members

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


Participate in the process of your community and country…

–it may need your specific participation.

–Mary Anne Radmacher-Hershey


1. Join us for a Maker Fun Factory Picnic in the Park

boy.telephonetalk
This Saturday, July 1st, we’ll be celebrating in the Moro City Park. There will be free food, games, music, and other fun stuff, so bring your family and friends to have some fun with us!

Moro City Park July 1st @12:00 pm
Contact the Moro Presbyterian church with questions 541-565-3630


2. Letter to the Editor: Thanks for the Opportunity to Give

Often we forget that someone else’s grandparents paid for our education….thru taxes, and with their contributions and labor for other community services such as churches and cemeteries.

Three of the local cemeteries remind me that I can help maintain those services for my family and my friends. Thanks for those reminders.  When my children were young, lower income and higher expenses made it hard to be generous.  As a grandmother, I want to support these things for my family and friends. Keep up the good work.  As a non-helping senior I and my friends should be willing to participate in this small manner!

Nell Melzer

Moro, Oregon


3. Oregon’s Top Ten Agricultural Products

  1. Cattle and Calves – Oregon’s farms and ranches were home to 100,000 head of cattle and calves in 2014. This important livestock commodity had a production value of $922 million that year.
  2. Greenhouse & Nursery – Ranking No. 1 in the nation for potted florist azaleas, greenhouse and nursery products are a major source of revenue for Oregon, with an $830 million value for production in 2014.
  3. Hay – This commodity had a $703 million production value in 2014. The 350,000 acres of hay harvested by Oregon farmers yielded 1.54 million tons.
  4. Milk & Dairy Products – The state’s 125,000 dairy cows produced 2.55 billion pounds of milk in 2014. Milk had a production value of $657 million in 2014.
  5. Grass Seed – The nation’s leading producer of orchardgrass seed, fescue seed and ryegrass seed, Oregon’s grass seed industry ensures that the world is a little greener. In 2014, the state’s grass seed production had a value of $449 million.
  6. Wheat – Oregon farmers produced 44.44 million bushels of wheat on 818,000 harvested acres in 2014. This staple grain crop had a production value of $302 million each year.
  7. Potatoes – Potatoes had a hearty production value of $165 million in 2014. Farmers harvested 38,900 acres of potatoes to be sold in grocery stores and fresh markets or to be processed into chips and other ready-to-eat products.
  8. Hazelnuts – Producers yielded a total of 36,000 tons of hazelnuts in 2014 to be sold whole, chopped or used as ingredients in high-value processed products. This crop had a healthy $130 million value of production.
  9. Pears – One of the state’s most prized fruit crops, pears had a $127 million production value in 2014. Oregon’s orchards bore 215,000 tons of pears that same year.
  10. Wine Grapes – Yet another lucrative fruit crop for Oregon, grapes had a production value of $118 million in 2014. Producers harvested 58,000 tons of grapes.

~ http://farmflavor.com/oregon/oregon-ag-products/oregons-top-10-agricultural-products/


4. Oregon Department of Transportation’s New Website

ORStateFlagThe Oregon Department of Transportation redesigned our website – www.oregon.gov/odot. The new site offers a fresh new look and easier navigation. We are now using a responsive design which means you’ll find the same information whether you’re using your desktop, tablet or smart phone!

Key features include enhanced search to help you find what you need when you need it and a streamlined navigation and structure. The best way to get to know the new site is to explore it! If you have any trouble finding what you need, please use the search bar located on the top of every page.

Important links

Creating a useful and usable website is a continual process in which user feedback plays a big role. We welcome your feedback odotwebteam@odot.state.or.us as we continue to work on improving the website.

For additional questions, please contact Abbey Driscoll, ODOT Community Liaison, at 541-388-6064 or abbey.driscoll@odot.state.or.us.


5. Time Alone Just to Think

faceblwhDoes being alone have to mean loneliness? Not necessarily. In fact, there is a good chance we all could use a certain amount of solitude. How much time do you spend alone, and how do you use this solitude?

If you live with others, time alone may sometimes seem like a precious commodity. However, it is important that you arrange to have some time alone, now and then. Not just a few minutes or hours, either, but a significant chunk of time you can call your own, planned for and taken.

If you live alone, you may feel isolated and lonely. Perhaps you try to fill your time with company or busy-work to keep yourself distracted. With hundreds of cable channels and the endless labyrinth of the internet, it’s pretty easy to keep ourselves distracted.

However, solitude, if you use it wisely, presents some wonderful opportunities for self-knowledge and growth that you really can’t get in any other way. Time alone, spent positively and thoughtfully, gives us a chance to explore our own values, develop a personal philosophy, and discover what is really important to us, without having to contend with other people’s expectations.

Now, this isn’t something you can do in one sitting and it’s not necessarily easy, either. But it is exciting and meaningful, and when you ask yourself the right questions, the answers you come up with can change your life. For example, what contribution do you want to make to the world? What is missing in your life? What is there too much of? What are your passions, what really gives you joy? Where is your life out of balance? What would you like to accomplish before you die?

Perhaps now would be a good time to set aside some moments of solitude and let those things you’ve been pushing away – because you have told yourself that “I don’t have time right now” – come to the surface. Let go of any fear or trepidation. Give those things you’ve been pushing away some thought-time, and perhaps allow an insight or two to see the light of day. ~The Pacific Institute


6. New School Board Members: 7 Signs of Effective School Board Members

teamwork.pencilBy Kathryn Blumsack and Terry McCabe

Congratulations! You’re now a member of the Board of Education. If you’re like most new board members, you’ve worked hard to reach this point. You’ve listened to your community, and come to understand its values and concerns. Above all, you’ve embraced the transformative power of a great board to improve public education. Local control of education through elected school boards is a deeply held American political tradition. School boards may be small and local, but they represent perhaps the most important daily civic commitment we as citizens make to our communities, our children, and our future.

As a new board member, you bring sharp questions, innovative ideas, and fresh energy. You’ll look at established routines and policies with new eyes, you’ll challenge old assumptions, and you’ll have the opportunity to share your perspective with your fellow board members. At the same time, you’ll learn how to make a positive difference in the work of the board, and how to contribute most effectively to lasting change. We want you to be the most effective possible advocate for your community’s educational vision and values. To help you succeed, we’re going to share with you the seven practices of highly effective boards.

  1. Going solo’s a no-no

You were elected to your board as an individual. You’ve got issues that are priorities for you. And you’ll get a lot of individual attention early on from friends, school employees, and community members who want you to tackle particular problems. The early temptation will be to say “yes’ and use your power to fix things.

Except you won’t have any power to use — not as an individual, at least. As a school board member, you have no individual legal authority to fix problems or decide issues. One of the wisest things you can do is to help others understand that you can only get your work done as part of a team. We’re not saying you can’t try to take the lead on a particular issue, or that you have to stay silent — not at all. In fact, the more you communicate and share with your fellow board members, the more likely you’ll be able to gain support for your priorities and ideas.

Look at the long term: Your success as a board member is inextricably tied to the success of your board. You will be judged by what it accomplishes, not by what you as an individual tried to accomplish. In all the years (decades!) we’ve worked with school boards, we’ve never heard anyone say something like, “That’s a bad board — except for Mary Smith.”

What do boards work on together? Everything. Consider the three main areas of board responsibility: legislative, administrative, and judicial. The first area of responsibility, legislative, refers to policy making. Effective boards adopt policies that give direction to the superintendent and staff, enabling them to manage the district. The board should seek appropriate input in the development of policy, and after adoption should hold the superintendent and staff accountable for its implementation.

Administration is the second area of responsibility. It includes approving and monitoring the budget, approving and monitoring district contracts, and hiring and evaluating the superintendent and appropriate staff. The administration should present the draft budget based on the goals and objectives outlined by the school board. It is up to the board to ensure that goals and objectives are truly aligned with the spending outlined in the budget. As for contracts, many states give final approval and responsibility for major contracts to the local board. It is important that you understand the bidding process and follow ethical guidelines in approving all contracts.

Finally, the board’s judicial responsibility refers to hearing formal appeals sessions brought forward by staff, students, or parents. Naturally, these appeals require confidentiality, impartiality, and a full understanding of school law and regulations. The judicial function is sporadic, but handling appeals properly is critical to the effectiveness and fairness of a school board. 

  1. Respect the team

You were elected as an individual, but you’ll work as part of a team. The best way to succeed as a board is to practice collaboration and respect. Because boards deal with extremely difficult and vexing issues — from budgets to grievances and everything in between — it’s common for emotions to sometimes run high. Keep in mind that you’re in this for the long haul, and the best way to succeed is to be part of a strong team. Boards whose members treat one another with respect tend to be the most effective. Those whose members give in to acrimony tend to get less done.

Collaboration and respect don’t mean consensus. Boards vote, and majorities rule. (But remember: This year’s majority could be next year’s minority.) There is honor in casting a sincere vote, win or lose. But, after the vote, effective boards move forward together. When you’re new, every challenge will be a first-time challenge. But you’ll come to realize that boards confront major issues all the time, and that a long-term commitment to collegiality and respect is critical to effective board governance.

The impact of respect goes beyond the board. The board sets the tone for the entire school system. Staff, students, parents, and the community are watching carefully to see how the board functions. Effective boards don’t only handle their own work well — they establish a model of collegiality and collaboration that builds confidence across the community that everyone is working to do what’s best for students.

  1. Understand the difference between board and staff

Effective board members refrain from trying to perform management functions that are the responsibility of the superintendent and staff. As a board member, it is your responsibility (along with your fellow board members) to ensure that the schools operate well. But it is not your responsibility to run them. That’s what the superintendent is for.

Boards do have great power, but it can seem a strange kind of power to new members because it’s not the power to order individuals to “do this” or “stop doing that.” It’s the power to establish goals and policies, and then the power to demand accountability for reaching those goals and executing those policies.

The fundamental reason to refrain from trying to perform management functions is so you can hold the system — and above all, its leader, the superintendent — accountable for results. Accountability is the key, and many recent educational reforms aim to clarify and strengthen accountability.

If the superintendent understands that he or she will be held accountable by the board to reach goals and execute policies, then the board has achieved a key part of its work. If board members muddy accountability by trying to involve themselves in management functions, then any individual “win” in a particular case has the larger effect of undermining overall system effectiveness.

Here’s a common situation for a new board member: You’ve been approached by concerned parents or community members about fixing an issue. If this happened during an election, you may have assured the concerned individuals you’d tackle this issue right away. You should listen to such concerns and questions, but rarely if ever will it be appropriate for you to directly contact a principal, a teacher, or a coach to try to solve the problem. That’s one of the main ways board members unintentionally diminish their effectiveness.

Part of your job is to help educate the school community about your responsibilities, explain the chain of command (or “chain of accountability,” as some board members call it), and direct concerned individuals to the appropriate staff person.

A useful guide for new board members is your school system’s policy on how to handle concerns from members of the public, to ensure that every concern gets a fair hearing and timely resolution. And if a concern merits board consideration, you should bring it up with your fellow board members.

  1. Share and defend your views, but listen to the views of others

Your board sets the standard for communication within the district. Do you want your district to be open to a thorough discussion, or are you more interested in your own point of view? School board members must have the ability to compromise. You won’t “win” on every issue you care about. More importantly, sometimes you’ll find that the information, perspectives, and ideas others have may change your mind, or lead to a new and even better collaborative idea.

In the charged and urgent arena of public education, expect to be flexible, even as you seek to honor your deepest values and commitments. There will be times when changes must be made, when tradition cannot be honored, or when pressure must be resisted. Sometimes, you’ll measure the true success of a board not by agreement, but by respectful disagreement and spirited discussion followed by a difficult vote. And after a difficult vote, effective boards embrace the decision and move forward together.

  1. Do your homework and ask tough questions

Members of effective boards come to meetings prepared to engage in discussions, ask questions, and seek clarification. A lot of background information is required to make policy and assess accountability. In meetings, asking sharp questions can help clarify issues not just for yourself, but for students, families, the community, and even school system employees.

Here are some good questions to keep in mind:

  • What is the goal of this initiative?
  • How does it align with our vision, mission, and system goals?
  • How much will it cost? What data tells us it’s important enough to merit the cost?
  • What data supports the notion that it will achieve the desired results?
  • Are staff ready to implement it? If not, what’s our plan?
  • How does it fit with our existing activities? Does it conflict with anything we’re already doing?
  • How will we evaluate the results?

Board members are not career education professionals. Sometimes this feels like a handicap because of all the jargon, technical language, and policy details that board members, especially new board members, may not know. But keep in mind that, in American public education, local board members are not expected to be experts. They are responsible for serving as a bridge between lifelong education professionals and local communities.

To build the bridge, some board members like to ask plain questions. Michael Harvey, a board member in Maryland’s Kent County, likes to encourage clarity and simplicity by asking, “How would you explain this policy to a parent?”

  1. Respect your oath

Local school board membership is a public office and a public trust. New members swear an oath to uphold laws pertaining to public education. An important aspect of the public trust is to maintain confidentiality when appropriate. Many issues considered by school boards must be handled in confidence, in executive or closed sessions. These commonly include personnel issues, legal matters, negotiations, land acquisition, and grievances.

Your state education laws determine which items must be considered in executive session or in appeals hearings, and specify the process for entering and exiting such a session. Everything discussed is confidential, with the exception of the summary public report the board president makes after the executive or closed session. If an individual board member divulges information from a closed or executive session, he or she may be held legally responsible. Significant costs and legal challenges may arise for the individual member, the board, and the entire school district.

Note that, while executive or closed sessions are permitted, most states require any action as a result of that executive session to be conducted in a public forum. Just as it is important to adhere to confidentiality for matters that should be confidential, it is important to ensure that no open-session topics are discussed, or actions taken, in executive or closed sessions. When in doubt, consult your board lawyer.

  1. Keep learning

Effective board members participate in professional development and commit the time and energy necessary to be informed and effective leaders. You should understand your school system’s vision, goals, and policies; its current successes, challenges, and opportunities; and the educational environment in your community.

Most importantly, you should know the aspirations and expectations of the students and parents. At the national level, American public education is undergoing major and rapid changes. Understanding and translating them for your community’s schools will require steady, ongoing work.

Many resources are available to you in this new position. You need to know about your state statutes and the organizing documents for your district. Work closely with your board chair and your superintendent to better understand district and board responsibilities. Your state school board association is a great resource for information and professional development. There are additional resources available through NSBA (www.nsba.org) and this magazine (www.asbj.com).

OK, new board members. That’s our advice. Congratulations again on your new job and new responsibilities. It’ll be exhausting, challenging, and sometimes painful. But, with luck, you’ll share the experience of many other school board members in the great American tradition: the most rewarding job you will ever have. 

Veteran school board members offer advice and a heads-up

Becoming a school board member can be a daunting task. To help, we called upon board members’ collective wisdom and experience to tell us what advice they found helpful when they joined their school boards. We also asked what they wish they’d known before becoming a school board member. 

What is the best piece of advice you received as a new board member?

  • Get to know what your role is as a board member, develop yourself in many ways, set goals for yourself, be positive, know your limits, and above all listen. — Jo Ann Beamer, board member, Ohio
  • Do not be in a hurry to do something. It takes time to develop governance skills. — Jill Wynns, board member, California
  • I am only one of five voting members and not a power of one. — Richard Asadoorian, board member, California
  • Read and learn your board policies and state law regarding school boards. — Ginny Moe, board member, South Carolina
  • Remember, you were elected by citizens. Try to carry their voices and needs. — Cynthia Shabb, board member, North Dakota
  • When people present you with a problem, make sure you ask them whether they have already discussed the issue with the building level administrator, i.e., principal, before bringing it to you. If they have not, ask them to before you begin investigating. — David Mauffray, board member, Mississippi
  • Once a decision is made you should support the decision. If you disagree, try to change the decision. — James R Dykeman, Jr., board member, Massachusetts
  • If it is not good enough for my child, it is not good enough for any child. — Bill Kress, board member, New York
  • Read your school state laws and codes and ask questions about anything you don’t understand. — Terisa Fitzpatrick, board member, Illinois.
  • As long as you are working in the best interest for the students, vote your conscience. — Mary Mathes, board member, Indiana
  • Read everything and to be prepared. — Iris Lane, board member, Virginia
  • If you feel like you are overwhelmed, you are micromanaging. — Jim Butt, board member, Pennsylvania
  • Be respectful of the opinions and positions of your fellow board members. — Scott M. Johnson, board member, New York
  • Your primary constituents are the students — who do not vote. — Charles Wilson, board member, Virginia
  • Change takes time. Start slow and build to fundamental change. — Sheldon Wigdor, retired board member, California
  • Don’t surprise your superintendent or the staff with questions at board meetings. Give them a heads up that you will be raising an issue so that they will be prepared to speak about it. — Jeff Phillips, board member, North Carolina
  • Don’t take things personally. — Vanessa hatcher, board member, Illinois
  • Recognize the difference between policy and procedure. — Bill Culbertson, board member, Kentucky
  • Create alliances with each board member, learn what they care about and how to present ideas to each and every person to speak to their beliefs.  — Mary S. Cunningham, board member, Virginia
  • Vote based on facts and data, rather than getting caught up in the politics or trading votes. — Kyle K. Walker, board member, Oregon
  • Be open to listen from all stakeholders before making up your mind. — Raymond Eng, board member, New Jersey
  • Go to the state association certified training as soon as possible. — Peggy Taylor, board member, Missouri
  • At Board meetings don’t respond immediately to criticisms or complaints — Kathleen Oxberry, board member, Pennsylvania 

What do you wish you had known before becoming a school board member?

  • How much time it would take. — Stephanie Gunderson, board member, Pennsylvania
  • All of the acronyms. — Steven Hermann, board member, Missouri
  • So much is prescribed by law. — Terry Reed, board member, Indiana
  • How demanding the job can be when there are “hot button” issues pending. — Cheryl D. Mayes, board member, Tennesssee
  • Constituents expect you to be on call 24/7. — Sann Knipple, board member, Illinois
  • Your first year is like drinking from a fire hose. The amount of reading materials and data is unbelievable. — Ronald Sommer, board member Vice-President, New York
  • That I would actually feel good about being a trustee. — Michael Castellano, board member, N.Y.
  • The misinformation that the public and parents have about public schools and how they educate children. — Elaine G. Davis, board member, Louisiana
  • I wish I would have known how best to communicate collaboratively as a board with the superintendent. — Michelle Engel, board member, Indiana
  • How rewarding it feels when things are going well, and to know you have been a good shephard for the district. — Nick Hankes, board member, Illinois
  • I wish I had known more about district finances. — Kathryn Simpson, board member, Washington state
  • That changing a system is hard work, even in a small district. — Kacie Neaby, board member, Washington state
  • As a board member, you personally will not make any difference, but as a team, you will. — Linda Kessler, board member, Wyoming
  • I did not realize how much “business” was involved. Purchases, leases, budgets, etc. I thought the work I would be doing would be closer to the children. — Bill Bradley, board member, Mississippi
  • I wish I had known how easily misunderstood board decisions may be in the community and how important it is to over-communicate. — Julia K Beckman, board member, Illinois
  • I wish I’d had a thorough study of Robert’s Rules of Order. — Ginny Moe, board member, South Carolina

~ http://www.asbj.com/TopicsArchive/SchoolGovernance/7-Signs-of-Effective-School-Board-Members.html


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3The most perfect thing, explained

Volkswagen Commercial

Voters Give Edge Now to Amnesty Over Border Control

Voters Want Tightly-Controlled Borders

Seattle’s Minimum Wage Charade Is Making People Poorer

Medicaid Reforms an Important Step

Sherman County eNews #189

CONTENT

  1. Greg Walden statement on proposed repeal of the Waters of the United States rule

  2. Public Notice: North Central Public Health District Exec. Committee, July 11

  3. North Central Education Service District June 22 Board Meeting

  4. Letter to the Editor: Post Carbon Energy Future

  5. Marine Board’s Operation Dry Water – It’s all about Impairment

  6. CCB Investigators Found 83 Alleged Violations by Unlicensed Oregon Contractors

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


Appreciation, respecting, and loving other people’s differences is the essence of a brilliant human experience and potential. Different people, different beliefs, different hopes, different dreams….Brilliant in every way!  ~ Chris Lawrence 


1. Greg Walden statement on proposed repeal of the Waters of the United States rule

American flag2WASHINGTON, D.C. —  Rep. Greg Walden (R-Hood River) released the following statement on the proposal to repeal the Waters of the United States rule:

“Today’s action is another welcome step towards repealing the troublesome WOTUS rule. I’ve heard from farmers, ranchers, and property owners in rural Oregon about the impact the overreaching WOTUS rule would have on their lives, ignoring Congressional intent and expanding EPA’s jurisdiction far beyond navigable waterways. The rule’s potential to affect everything from stock ponds to irrigation ditches created uncertainty and threatened jobs and livelihoods across the West. Today is a victory for rural communities in Oregon and I look forward to the administration crafting a rule that ensures clean water without overreaching its authority.”


 2. Public Notice: North Central Public Health District Exec. Committee, July 11

The North Central Public Health District Executive Committee will be meeting Tuesday, July 11, 2017 at 3:00 p.m. at North Central Public Health District located at 419 E. 7th Street, in the Main Meeting Room, in The Dalles, Oregon. This meeting is open to the general public.


3. North Central Education Service District June 22 Board Meeting

The North Central ESD Board of Directors met in regular session in the NCESD Conference Room, Thursday, June 22, 2017. Amy Derby, Chair-June 2019, P—Geremy Shull-June 2017, Sarah Rucker-June 2017-Via Phone, Jeff Schott -June 2017, Robert Waltenburg, Superintendent, and Kim Domenighini, Business Manager, were present. Absent were Jim Doherty-June 2017 and Kristen Neuberger-June 2019.

Unapproved meeting minutes indicate that no visitors were present, minutes of the previous meeting and financial reports and financial resolutions were approved and the Local Service Plan for 2017-2018 was distributed.

Superintendent Robert Waltenburg reported that North Central Public Health District will rent space in the NCESD building beginning July 1 and that lobbyist Rob Myers will attend the next board meeting to give an update on the legislative session where school funding is under discussion. Waltenburg updated the board on union contract negotiations.

Waltenburg recommended and the board unanimously approved contracting with Columbia Gorge Education Service District for the superintendent’s position for $70,100 for .40 FTE for the 2017-2018 year. Waltenburg’s contract ending June 30 was accepted by the board.

The next NCESD board meeting is set for July 6 at 6 p.m. at which time the June 22 minutes will be on the agenda for approval.


4. Letter to the Editor: Post Carbon Energy Future 

Hi Sherry,

George Mobus is not a fossil fuel insider or a right wing radical nut case. He is a home grown intellectual trying to understand how we are going to proceed as a society into a post carbon energy future. The general populace is kept uninformed about our present and not too distant energy future. Unless we can come up with something we are not aware of now, to substitute for fossil fuel in the next decade or two, we could be facing one of the bleakest episodes in human history. This subject should have been society’s #1 project for the last 50 years. The conversation about this (as I recall) was started in the early ‘60s…..What happened? It really doesn’t make any difference at this point. This is the way it has evolved and if we face our energy reality maybe we can alleviate some of the pain in transformation to a post carbon future. We have squandered this most unbelievable energy gift on greed and self indulgence.

The renewable energy systems we are presently aware of now won’t replace our present energy requirements (not even close). It is up to each individual to investigate, research, and to become as educated as possible about the state of our energy requirements and our ability to meet those requirements going forward. We have models, like the electric vehicles, wind generation, solar PV, solar thermal, biomass, conservation, etc., but these are only models and cannot be scaled up to replace the energy we are accustomed to presently. Oil and, to a lesser degree, coal are the master fuels that make all other energy sources possible. Oil is what makes life possible as we know it. It enables every one and every thing in our lives. It is finite and we can see the end of it. We need to prepare ourselves for a future with a lot less of it.

Of course, this is an opinion of a relatively few concerned individuals. I hope we are wrong. See http://questioneverything.typepad.com/about.html.

Sincerely,

Fred Justesen

Grass Valley, Oregon


5. Marine Board’s Operation Dry Water – It’s all about Impairment 

The Marine Board and law enforcement from 32 counties and the Oregon State Police will be participating in Operation Dry Water, during the weekend of June 30- July 2, as part of a nationally coordinated effort to reduce the number of accidents and fatalities related to boating under the influence of intoxicants (BUII).

Last year saw a spike in boating accidents, from 62 in 2015 to 82 in 2016, many involving alcohol and marijuana use. “To help marine officers prepare, we train them to recognize drug and alcohol impairment and arrest those operators –including those with paddles,” says Randy Henry, Boating Safety Manager for the Marine Board.

Boating under the influence of intoxicants means prescription drugs, alcohol, inhalants, marijuana, or any other substance that impairs a person’s ability to make sound judgments and have the ability to safely operate a boat. The effects of drugs and alcohol are also amplified on the water with the combination of sun, glare, wind, waves and other motion.

Impaired boaters can expect to be arrested or face serious penalties. In Oregon, the consequences of being convicted of BUII include the possibility of jail time, $6,250 in fines and loss of boating privileges. Marine officers can arrest boaters on observed impairment and can legally obtain blood, breath or urine if a boater fails field sobriety testing. So far this year, twelve people have been arrested for BUII and were operating on the Willamette River in Benton County, Upper Klamath Lake, Lake of the Woods, Crescent and Odell Lakes, Clackamas River, and Foster and Detroit Reservoirs.

“Overall, recreational boating is very safe if boaters wear life jackets, boat sober, and keep a sharp lookout by looking at what’s in front of them and what’s going on around them. If boaters followed these guidelines, accidents would be extremely rare. So far this year, the pattern for accidents includes impairment, distracted operation and no life jacket,” Henry warns. Henry goes on to say, “The public is our ally in safe boating. If you see an impaired operator or someone who is operating in a way that threatens others’ safety, call 911 and report it. That’s how we can work together to save lives.”

For more information about Operation Dry Water, visit www.operationdrywater.org or the Marine Board’s Boating Safety Program at www.boatoregon.com.


6. CCB Investigators Found 83 Alleged Violations by Unlicensed Oregon Contractors

The Oregon Construction Contractor Board (CCB) found 83 suspected violations of illegal construction resulting from visits to 380 job sites during a recent multistate enforcement action targeting the construction industry.

The Oregon “sweeps” of job sites occurred in early June, when CCB investigators showed up unannounced at job sites in the Bend area and along the state’s northern border from Astoria to Pendleton.

Most alleged violations involved contractors who had employees but lacked workers’ compensation insurance and people working without a license. CCB staff will now determine whether to issue penalties in the cases.

Nearly everyone who repairs, remodels or builds a home needs a CCB license, and contractors with employees must carry workers’ compensation insurance to cover job-related injuries.

Oregon joined seven other states in the nationwide action coordinated by the National Association of State Contractor Licensing Agencies (NASCLA).

“This coordinated multistate enforcement effort is a great way for us to draw attention to the work our enforcement staff carry on throughout our state every day,” Administrator James Denno said.

“We take enforcement very seriously. If you hire an unlicensed contractor, you put yourself and your property at risk. Licensed contractors carry bonds and insurance, important requirements that provide protection for the public,” Denno added. “We also provide mediation services where we help to iron out disputes that sometimes arise between homeowners and contractors. If you hire an unlicensed contractor, you don’t have access to this service.”

Contractors must include their CCB license number on any advertising so consumers can easily verify their license. To do so:
Visit www.oregon.gov/ccb.
Enter the license number or name in the orange “Search” feature.
Verify that the license is “active” and that the name and other information on the license matches the contractor in question.
Call 503-378-4621 for help searching or understanding the results.

Contractors and consumers can report unlicensed contractors and other illegal activity on the CCB’s website or by calling 503-934-2246.

In looking for contractors, the CCB advises consumers to get references from friends and neighbors, or others in the construction industry, such as supply stores. Contractors seeking work through online lists must include their CCB number in all advertising. Additionally, consumers should not rely on online references alone.

“Probably the biggest problems arise through lack of a written contract detailing the work to be done, including the exact products that will be installed, and failure to document change orders,” Enforcement Manager Stan Jessup said. “Consumers and contractors should make sure they have a system in place for regularly communicating with one another.”

The CCB has a variety of consumer tools on its website at www.oregon.gov/ccb. They include:
A new consumer guide on how to hire and work with a contractor. Order a copy by email: ccbeducation@state.or.us.
A short video on how to avoid construction scams.
Information about filing a complaint against a contractor for shoddy work or breach of contract.
A Buyer Beware list highlighting some of Oregon’s most active predatory contractors.
Email alerts providing regular tips to consumers contemplating projects.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do 

bird.crow.flyCelilo Falls Area History

Experience Fossil, Oregon

Oregon ranching standoff defendant gets home detention

Caution!

Slow-moving farm vehicles and implements!

Contests for Youth

 If European Borders Were Drawn By DNA Instead Of Ethnicity

 How The Nile Has Changed Course Over The Past 5,000 Years

Chasing Ernest: A Journey to South Georgia to Find the Ghost of Shackleton

Caution!

It snowed and it rained!

The crops grew and so did the roadside vegetation!

Please do not park your vehicle in dry grass!

Prevent fires!

Peak Energy & Resources, Climate Change, and the Preservation of Knowledge 

Pessimism & Optimism vs. Ignorance

21 Top Scientists Show Why Renewable Scheme is a Delusional Fantasy

Here’s our first look at iOS 11, which will bring massive changes to your iPhone and iPad

Fast and Furious Whistleblower Says He Became an ‘Enemy of the State’

 Global Warming: The Imminent Crisis That Never Arrives


 

Sherman County eNews #188

CONTENT

  1. Public Meeting Notice: Frontier TeleNet Emergency Meeting, June 29

  2. Public Meeting Notice: Sherman County Court, July 5

  3. Sherman County Oregon Youth Conservation Corps Offers Assistance

  4. Creating Connection for the Arts & Culture Communities, June 30

  5. Farmers & Ranchers Invited to Complete Gorge Grown Food Network and OSU/WSU Extension Survey

  6. Long After the Words are Forgotten


1. Public Meeting Notice: Frontier TeleNet Emergency Meeting, June 29 

FRONTIER TELENET

Emergency Meeting

June 29th 2:00 PM

Gilliam County Courthouse – Courtroom

CONDON, OREGON

          AGENDA

  1. Call the meeting to order
  2. Roll Call
  3. Additions to the agenda
  4. Public comment
  5. Discussion of Oregon Government Ethics Commission response letter and FTN Board response
  6. Public Comment
  7. Adjournment

**If necessary, an Executive Session may be held in accordance with:   ORS 192.660 (2) (d) Labor Negotiations   ORS 192.660 (2) (h) Legal Rights ORS 192.660 (2) (e) Property  ORS 192.660 (2) (i) Personnel


2. Public Meeting Notice: Sherman County Court, July 5

The Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, July 5, 2017, at 9:00 a.m. will take place in the Circuit Courtroom at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039. Agenda updates will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.


 ShCoCourt.7.5.17


3. Sherman County Oregon Youth Conservation Corps Offers Assistance

The Sherman County OYCC Crew has started their work for the summer throughout the county! We have a set schedule of different places where we will be doing jobs.  On days when we have open windows of time, we would love to offer our assistance to our senior citizens or disabled community members! If you or somebody you know needs help with small outdoor tasks,  please contact Sherman Co. OYCC  at 541-565-5036.


4. Creating Connection for the Arts & Culture Communities, June 30

art.toolsTHE DALLES— Do you work for an arts and culture organization? Attend Creating Connection, a one-day workshop Friday, June 30, 2017 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum, 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles, Oregon.

You will learn some of the best practices, tips, tools, and resources for attracting new audiences, retaining existing audiences, and developing deeper relationships with diverse communities.

Who can benefit from this one-day workshop? Independent artists and graphic designers, marketing, PR and executive leadership, and social media managers, staff and board from arts and culture organizations, museums,  or art galleries.

Learn how to move arts from a “nicety” to a “necessity” and tips to enhance audiences’ experience through active programming. Creating Connection is a national initiative to advance the position of arts and culture as a recognized, valued, and expected part of our everyday lives.

Free. Register by Wednesday at: https://goo.gl/forms/ZmDR8CNeaOZF4Up33

For more information about Creating Connection, contact: Candace Johnson, 503-517-3703 or email cjohnson@metgroup.com


5. Farmers & Ranchers Invited to Complete Gorge Grown Food Network and OSU/WSU Extension Survey

food.sack1Are you a farmer or rancher?  You are invited to take a quick survey from Gorge Grown Food Network and OSU/WSU Extension

Gorge Grown Food Network, OSU Extension and WSU Extension are engaged in planning their programs, workshops and projects for the next few years and have teamed up to create a survey that will inform this work. Your feedback will go a long way to inform the educational offerings and projects that we undertake in the coming years. We want to make sure we are truly providing the services you need. We recognize your time during the growing season is valuable and scarce, and have tried to streamline our questions to take approximately 10 minutes. 

Click here to complete the survey: http://oregonstate.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3l4Kk1BowLNJZIN

We really appreciate your efforts.

~Hannah Brause

hannah.brause@wsu.edu

~Rachel Suits

~ rachel.suits@oregonstate.edu

Liz Oberhausen

liz@gorgegrown.com


 6. Long After the Words are Forgotten

How effective are you at getting your message across when you speak? Whether it’s speaking to large groups or small, if you think you could be better, here are a few pointers that might help.

When speaking to groups of people, there is more going on that just the words we use. The actual words we say are only part of the picture when it comes to getting people to remember what we have said. You have probably noticed this before, but it may not have been at the conscious level.

Whether you are speaking in front of a large group, to your kids, or with your boss – they aren’t just listening to your words. Your non-verbal body language – what you are wearing, how you stand or sit, your posture, eye contact, tone of voice – all carry a strong message. For example, if you say, “Tell me about it” to your children, but don’t stop what you are doing and you don’t look directly at them, what you are really saying is, “You are not important enough for me to pay attention to you.” Now, you may not actually say these words, but your children get the message.

Using your voice effectively is important, too. You can set the tone of a conversation by how loudly or softly you speak, and you can emphasize the parts you really want remembered by raising or lowering your voice. Of course, you already know about the impact of smiles and frowns. A smile usually means approval, openness and approachability. But even smiles can be threatening if they don’t match the content of what you are saying.

Effective communication has become a critical component of successful organizations. If you want to be a good communicator, pay attention not only to what you say, but also to the way you say it. That is often what will be remembered, long after the words themselves are forgotten. ~The Pacific Institute