Sherman County eNews #80

CONTENT

  1. Easter Egg Hunt with North Sherman County RFPD, April 15

  2. Presentation: Mushroom Identification & Foraging, April 16, 17

  3. Final Reminder for Cultural Coalition Spring Grant Applications

  4. Spring Whale Watch Week Runs March 25-31

  5. Tell Teachers about Summer Ag Institute!

  6. Sherman County 4-H Club News

  7. Columbia Gorge Hospitality Industry Reception, April 5

  8. Sherman County Court Notes, March 15


1. Easter Egg Hunt with North Sherman County RFPD, April 15

Easter.egg1Please join us for the 41st(or so we think) Rufus Fire Department(now North Sherman County RFPD) Easter Egg Hunt! Saturday, April 15th at Noon located at the old Rufus School grounds. Look for the big red fire trucks!!! Prizes will be given to all children ages 0-12.


2. Presentation: Mushroom Identification & Foraging, April 16, 17

Mushroom Identification & Foraging

Thursday, April 6 5:30 Goldendale Community Library

Monday, April 17 6 White Salmon Valley Community Library

Questions? 509-773-4487


3. Final Reminder for Cultural Coalition Spring Grant Applications

The Application Deadline is March 27, 2017, for the Sherman County Cultural Coalition Spring Grant Cycle. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: https://www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:
Sherman County Cultural Coalition
P.O. Box 23
Moro, OR 97039

Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


4. Spring Whale Watch Week Runs March 25-31

Depoe Bay OR — Bring your binoculars for a chance to see gray whales passing by the Oregon coast during Spring Whale Watch Week March 25-31. Trained volunteers from the Whale Watching Spoken Here program will be stationed at 24 designated whale watch sites 10 a.m. — 1 p.m. daily to help visitors learn about the whales’ migration and feeding habits and offer tips on how to spot them. A map of the watch sites is available online at www.whalespoken.org.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) Whale Watching Center in Depoe Bay will also be open 10 a.m. — 4 p.m. daily during the Watch Week. The Whale Watching Center has interpretive exhibits on whales, “whale size” windows with panoramic ocean views, and rangers on hand to answer questions. The Whale Watching Center is located at 119 SW Hwy. 101 in Depoe Bay.

OPRD coordinates both the Spring and Winter Whale Watch Weeks in partnership with Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center and Washington State Parks. More information about the Whale Watching Spoken Here program is available at www.whalespoken.org or by calling (541) 765-3304.


5. Tell Teachers about Summer Ag Institute!

A project of the Oregon Farm Bureau Foundation for Education, the Summer Ag Institute (SAI) is a three-credit, week-long, graduate-level class through Oregon State University that educates K-12 teachers with little or no background in agriculture.

The goal of SAI is to help educators use agriculture as a context for teaching standard subjects like science, math, social studies, and English. Current, factual, and scientific information about agriculture is presented, and participants are provided with educational materials to help them incorporate what they’ve learned into their classrooms.

Through SAI, teachers are given first-hand experiences in the agriculture industry. The action-packed week includes field trips to farms and ranches, tours of processing plants, and lectures and hands-on labs taught by university professors. The highlight of the week is an overnight stay on a working farm where the teacher has an opportunity to meet a real farm family.

There are two sessions:  Corvallis June 25-30 and LaGrande July 16-21.

Registration is open for this summer’s session: http://oregonfb.org/programs/summer-ag-institute/.  Cost is $600, which includes tuition, housing, meals, transportation and more.  Teachers will receive 3 graduate level credits from OSU (equivalent to 60 PDUs).

Win a scholarship and attend for free!  The Columbia Gorge chapter of Oregon Women for Agriculture would like to sponsor a teacher from the gorge area to attend SAI.  If interested, contact Cindy Brown at 541-5656-3230 or email cindy.brown@oregonstate.edu


6. Sherman County 4-H Club News

4-H clover1The Sherman 4-H outdoor cooking club “Pans on Fire” met on March 20 at 3:40pm at the Extension Office.  Attending were:  Bella, Juliette (guest), Emma, Pyeper, Gabe, Hunter, Gabe, Calvin, Ben, Antone, Josh, Bennet.  Excused was Maddie.  Pledge of Allegiance led by Bella, 4-H Pledge by Emma.  We discussed where you can do outdoor cooking, like camping trips, BBQ or when power is out.  Challenges are bugs, the wind, dirt and your equipment.  We talked about outdoor cooking we’ve done.  Used rocket stoves.  Made hot cocoa and old fashioned popcorn.  Next meeting in April.  Meeting adjourned 4:56pm. ~ Submitted by Pyeper Walker, News Reporter.


7. Columbia Gorge Hospitality Industry Reception, April 5

Members of the Gorge cultural and hospitality communities – hoteliers, restaurateurs, wineries and breweries – are invited to kick off the annual tourism season with a special reception at Maryhill Museum of Art, 5-7 p.m. Enjoy hors d’oeuvres, artist demos, and a chance to chat with colleagues in the field. Presented in collaboration with Columbia Gorge Tourism Alliance, Columbia Gorge Arts and Culture Alliance, Museums of the Gorge and Gorge Open Studios. Let us know you’re coming – RSVP to 509.773.3733 ext. 20


8. Sherman County Court Notes, March 15

ShermanCoLogo~ By Administrative Assistant Lauren Hernandez

(This is a brief summary of topics addressed and is not official minutes. For official minutes and details, please see the official approved minutes posted after the April 5 court session on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us.)

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on March 15, 2017, and in conducting the business of the county,

  • heard a Sherman County fiber optic marketing update from Mike Smith, Frontier TeleNet (FTN); FTN is working with CenturyLink and Lightspeed Networks (LSN) to explore possible partnerships; LSN is not going to utilize the county’s fiber at the school but will install an aerial line; because the county already has fiber at the school, the county could offer to provide backup services in the case of an outage; Mike has been in discussion with an Internet Service Provider (ISP) about providing fiber to the cities in Sherman County; Sherman County and FTN do not want to directly compete with ISPs but will provide access on fiber in the county for ISPs to provide service; some entities have requirements beyond the standard of what ISPs can provide; when fiber access is provided to the cities, a large volume of traffic will be removed from the county’s wireless microwave system, which will result in a significant increase in available bandwidth for those outside of the cities in rural areas; the fiber has created the opportunity for Frontier TeleNet to use the digital switch to partner with other counties to provide 911 dispatch services, which may prompt the building of a backup 911 center;
  • entered into executive session in accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (e) Property to discuss the possible future use of property near Scott Canyon;
  • heard a report from Isaak McLemore, Sherman County School, about a leadership conference he attended in January 2017; Isaak was able to attend the conference with funding assistance from the court; Isaak presented a workbook of information he learned as well as pictures from his trip; he spent four days in Washington D.C.; Isaak had the opportunity to work in bipartisan groups writing a reform on education and to take place in debates; he heard from the Speaker of the House, met with Senator Merkley, and was able to attend the ceremony on inauguration day; during the next budget cycle, the court is considering creating a fund to support student civics activities to give Sherman County students the opportunity to have experiences similar to Isaak’s;
  • met with Brad Baird, Anderson Perry & Associates, to discuss progress on the Biggs Service District Water System Improvements Project; the United States Department of Agricultural funding application and the Environmental Report have been submitted; public notice will be submitted to Sherman County’s paper of record notifying the public of this submission; Brad will meet with Terry Sanderson to finalize the plan for earthwork for the access road; he will then meet with Mark Coles, Road Master, to discuss the plan; Brad asked the court to confirm the earthwork being done, including moving a mound of dirt to fill in a hole, grading the road along the fence, and leveling out the reservoir site; Brad believes the project could possibly receive funding by June; an archeological evaluation will be required at the access road and reservoir site; a visual pedestrian survey will be done, as well as shovel test probes; the court approved the expenditure of an archeology study of the reservoir site and access road up to $8,300;
  • opened a continuation of the public hearing regarding the Ordinance Repealing Ordinance No. 29-2005, Defining Procedure for Mass Gathering Permit Application, and Declaring an Emergency; Georgia Macnab, Planning Director, explained the racetrack can be exempt from the ordinance because it already has requirements and procedures written into the master plan; Commissioner Dabulskis stated he received concerns the racetrack was being treated differently than festivals regarding mass gatherings; Georgia explained the two cannot be compared, as the racetrack went through a rigorous regulation and permitting process and has a masterplan and guidelines; SHIFT Festival representatives were present during the mass gathering ordinance process and contributed and collaborated with the county; the ordinance was revised to state that comments about mass gathering applications will be received by the Planning Director, and the title Public Works Director was changed to Road Master; the court adopted the Ordinance Repealing Ordinance No. 29-2005, Defining Procedure for Mass Gathering Permit Application, and Declaring an Emergency as amended; Georgia will put together the mass gathering application;
  • met with Jacob Dunaway, Solutions iT, to discuss the process of renewing the county website; Jacob recommended the county transition to a WordPress website, as it is the most versatile; transferring information from the current website to a new website is a large task; there is a large cost associated with moving the current website information to a new site; the current website has 74 pages and approximately 300 PFD files, plus other content; once all information is transferred to a new website, it will cost less to continue to advance the site; Jacob explained the website would be hosted on a server, and WordPress requires updates and ongoing maintenance for security purposes; Jacob stated no matter which entity the county chooses to update the website, he recommends WordPress for the county’s needs; the current website is ineffective and antiquated; Jacob explained Solutions iT’s design process; the county will put out a Request for Proposal for renewing the website; Jacob briefly explained the process of the upcoming network discovery taking place at the courthouse; if Solutions iT finds any inefficiencies or problems, it will present the findings to the court and give recommendations about services it can provide to help address them;
  • met with Jessica Metta, Mid-Columbia Economic Development District, about the Sherman County Rental Housing Incentive Program; the court previously approved offering a $5,000 incentive for each qualified new rental housing construction unit in the county; the county still offers a construction loan-bridge fund; the rental incentive will be for new construction, but if a project doesn’t fit the guidelines, it will be brought to the court for review; the court discussed using the incentive for renovation of older rental properties; the incentive will be for new construction to encourage the expansion of rentals available in the county;
  • reviewed an audit response letter to the Secretary of State from Debbie Hayden, Finance Director; the court approved the response letter to the audit report for year ending June 30, 2016;
  • entered into executive session in accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (i) Personnel;
  • approved the Confidentiality and Nondisclosure Agreement between Solutions iT LLC and Sherman County for the provision of a network discovery technology survey and authorized Judge Thompson to sign;
  • approved the Resolution of the Board of Directors Authorizing the Withdrawal of North Central Education Service District from Frontier TeleNet Intergovernmental Agency and authorized Judge Thompson to sign;
  • approved the joint resolution between the County Court/Boards of Commissioners for Gilliam, Hood River, Sherman, Wasco, and Wheeler counties In the Matter of Participation in Funding Activities of the Oregon Office for Community Dispute Resolution and authorized Judge Thompson to sign;
  • approved the joint resolution between the County Court/Boards of Commissioners for Gilliam, Hood River, Sherman, Wasco, and Wheeler counties In the Matter of the Designation of a Community Dispute Resolution Coordinator for the 2017-2019 Biennium Community Dispute Resolution Grant process and authorized Judge Thompson to sign;
  • appointed Mike Smith as Sherman County Community Advisory Council representative on the Eastern Oregon Coordinated Care Organization Regional Community Advisory Council;
  • appointed Judge Thompson to serve on the Central Oregon Workforce Consortia to represent Sherman County’s interests in the East Cascades Workforce Area;
  • approved Intergovernmental Agreement #31548 between the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) and Sherman County for services to be provided by ODOT for Continuous Operations Variance Permit Authorization;
  • proclaimed the week of April 2-8, 2017, as Sherman County Crime Victims’ Rights Week and authorized Judge Thompson to sign;
  • proclaimed April as Sherman County Sexual Assault Awareness Month and authorized Judge Thompson to sign;
  • declared as surplus a Commercial KitchenAid mixer from the Senior Center;
  • approved an estimate from FLI Landscape in the amount of $470.50 for spring maintenance in the front flower beds and flower beds not affected by construction;
  • approved payment of the following invoices for the Biggs Service District Water System Improvements Project: invoice 58993 for $10,000 for design engineering and invoice 58992 for $2,700, 58821 for $3,176.25, and 58994 for $3,742.88 for United States Department of Agriculture application funding assistance;
  • approved the Professional Services Agreement between Sherman County and Forensic Building Consultants in the amount of $1,125 for an isolated roof leak assessment at the Sherman County Public/School Library and authorized Judge Thompson to sign;
  • appointed Jesse Stutzman to the Sherman County Area Watersheds Council Board of Directors as Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District representative for a term of four years to expire on December 31, 2020, and removed DeeAnn Ramos from the board per her request;
  • discussed unserved areas to community college services, the wildlife services budget request for 2017-2018, a letter of concern from Carol MacKenzie regarding the location of a potential 911 backup center in Rufus, a thank you letter from Columbia Gorge Community College, and a Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Notice of Measure of Election;
  • heard reports from court members about regional board activities.

 

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