Sherman County eNews #73

CONTENT

  1. Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators’ Program, March 21

  2. Unit 20, Retired Educators Offer Scholarship

  3. Legislation is a Process

  4. The Oregon Encyclopedia Posts New Sherman County Entry

  5. Nine Places Where You Can Still See Wheel Tracks from the Oregon Trail

  6. The Oregon Trail in Sherman County

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1.Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators’ Program, March 21

Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators, will meet at noon Tuesday, the 21st, in the Café at the Gorge Discovery Center & Museum.  Roxandra Pennington, Education Director, will present the program.  Luncheon reservations should be made by the 19th by contacting Wilma Townsend at 541-296-4356.


2. Unit 20, Retired Educators Offer Scholarship

Mid-Columbia Unit 20 of the Oregon Retired Educators Association is offering a $750 scholarship to a 3rd, 4th or 5th year college student (as of this coming September) who aspires to become a teacher and is attending an Oregon school. Families must reside in Hood River, Wasco or Sherman counties. Application deadline is May 1. For an application and further information and further information, contact Frank Wall, 541-354-1505, wallfm@gorge.net.


3. Legislation is a Process 

Legislative Process http://www.house.gov/content/learn/legislative_process/.

Legislative Committee Process  http://www.speaker.gov/general/american-health-care-act-four-committee-process.


4. The Oregon Encyclopedia Posts New Sherman County Entry

The Oregon Encyclopedia published a new Sherman County entry, the John and Helen Moore House. http://oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/moore_house_j_h. Previously published stories include Sherman County Courthouse, DeMoss Springs Park and Camp Rufus. Two additional stories are in a review process.


5. Nine Places Where You Can Still See Wheel Tracks from the Oregon Trail

Covered WagonThe legendary trail has carved itself into American history—and, in some places, into the earth itself

By Jennifer Billock

smithsonian.com

Any child of the 1980s is familiar with the basic skeleton of the Oregon Trail, from the celebrations warranted by a sight of Chimney Rock to the dangers of running a team of oxen at a grueling pace with meager rations. But even devoted players of the classic computer game, which turned 45 this year, may not know that relics of the trail itself are still carved into the landscapes of the United States.

The trail itself—all 2,170 miles of it—was braved by more than 400,000 people between 1840 and 1880. Weighed down with wagons and their personal possessions, the pioneers who dared travel the Oregon Trail slowly helped build the United States’ western half. The trail began in Independence, Missouri, and continued to the Willamette Valley in Oregon, where pioneers could decide to either stay put or continue north or south and settle.

As the Oregon Trail evolved, thousands of wagons wore ruts into the ground that acted as an ad-hoc road for the settlers who followed. But they didn’t follow a single solid path. Rather, wagon wheels left ruts across the country as pioneers found various shortcuts and easier routes along the way. Many of those ruts still exist today, though some of them are in danger of destruction as municipalities push to stretch bigger and better power supplies across the region.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/follow-relics-oregon-trail-180960589/#26X3PlwyCG0jbUzL.99
See: Oregon Trails, Rails & Roads at the national-award-winning Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro, Oregon, open daily May through October


6. The Oregon Trail in Sherman County

cowboy2Sherman County’s national-award-winning museum features an Oregon Trail exhibit with hands-on activities for kids, a good place to start exploring the Trail. Pick up the exhibit’s award-winning supplementary brochure. See http://www.shermanmuseum.org/html/sc_exhibits.html

Visit the Sherman County Historical Society Oregon Trail monument and the Bureau of Land Management kiosk at McDonald where the Oregon Trail crosses the John Day River. Step foot on the trail west of Biggs Junction where a trail segment is marked beside Hwy. 30 and visit an informational kiosk at Deschutes State Park.

The Cut-off to the Barlow Road interpretive sign is located at Grass Valley’s city park.


 7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do 

bird.owl.limbThings to See and Do in Sherman County, Oregon http://www.co.sherman.or.us/things_to_do_rivers.asp

The truth about Daylight Saving Time and agriculture http://odanews.wpengine.com/the-truth-about-daylight-saving-time-and-agriculture/ 

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife http://www.dfw.state.or.us/news/2017/

Still Fighting, and Dying, in the Forever War https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/09/opinion/sunday/still-fighting-and-dying-in-the-forever-war.html?emc=edit_th_20170310&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=35377422&_r=0

100 Year Betrayal of Israel by the West http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2017/03/the_100_year_betrayal_of_israel_by_the_west.html

‘Palestinian’ Is a Fabricated Nationality http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2017/03/palestinian_is_a_fabricated_nationality_.html

ALINSKY’s RULES FOR RADICALS 101: WHAT CONSERVATIVES NEED TO KNOW ABOUT OBAMA’s PLAN to FUNDAMENTALLY CHANGE AMERICA http://www.varight.com/alinskys-12-rules-for-radicals/

Truth Revolt.  Trump Derangement Syndrome is not temporary insanity but “a calculated plan to wreck the presidency, whatever the cost to the country.” http://www.truthrevolt.org/commentary/powell-obama-organizing-action-and-death-throes-democratic-party

30,000 People Expected for the Solar Eclipse Party http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/5139502-151/30000-people-expected-for-solar-eclipse-party?referrer=popular


 

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