Sherman County eNews #43

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Emergency Services January Activity Report

  2. Sherman County FFA Seeks Volunteers for Career Development Event, Feb. 22

  3. Sherman County Book Club, Feb. 15

  4. “Sticks in Stacks” at Sherman County Public/School Library, Feb. 16

  5. Sherman County Driver Education Parent/Student/Teacher Night, Feb. 23

  6. Public Notice: Sherman County Planning Commission Hearings (2), Feb. 27

  7. Hard winter results in more wildlife on the road

  8. The Danger in the Familiar


1. Sherman County Emergency Services January Activity Report

Sherman County Ambulance

January 2017 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
1/01 6:05 PM Motor Vehicle Crash Rollover US 97  MP# 21
1/01 8:02 PM Motor Vehicle Crash Rollover I-84  MP# 101
1/02 2:18 AM Motor Vehicle Crash Rollover US 97  MP# 46
1/02 10:56 AM Motor Vehicle Crash Rollover US 97  MP# 42.5
1/02 11:06 AM Motor Vehicle Crash Rollover US 97  MP# 46
1/02 11:06 AM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 42.5
1/03 11:52 AM Semi-Truck Crash US 97  MP# 7
1/03 2:10 PM Breathing Problem Moro
1/03 6:29 PM Abdominal Pain Grass Valley
1/06 4:57 PM Altered Mental Status Moro
1/07 2:00 PM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 43
1/08 5:00 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I 84  MP# 110
1/09 1:56 PM Cardiac Issues Rufus
1/10 3:17 PM Unknown Illness Wasco
1/10 4:26 PM Back Pain Wasco
1/11 8:05 PM Chest Pain Rufus
1/11 4:50 PM Lift Assist Wasco
1/14 11:20 AM Chest Pain Pilot Station in Biggs
1/14 7:28 PM Chest Pain I-84  MP# 109
1/17 3:25 PM Fall Moro
1/17 5:22 PM Multiple Crashes US 97  MP# 35 – 38
1/17 7:02 PM Semi-Truck Crash US 97  MP#32
1/17 8:20 PM Semi-Truck Crash US 97  MP# 42
1/19 2:23 PM Breathing Problem Sherman County Medical Clinic
1/21 7:16 AM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 23
1/22 7:20 AM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 30
1/23 8:28 AM Kidney Pain Rufus
1/24 12:14 AM Semi Truck in Water I-84  MP# 108
1/24 2:41 PM Fall Injury – Knee Pain McDonalds in Biggs
1/24 10:22 PM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 30
1/25 12:52 PM Diabetic Emergency Bull Dog Diner
1/26 8:30 AM Sick Person Moro
1/28 9:45 PM Motor Vehicle Crash Rollover I -84  MP# 109

 

Moro Fire Department

January 2017 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
1-01 6:09 PM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 24
1-07 2:12 PM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 43

 

North Sherman County RFPD

Activity Reports

December 2016

Date Time Incident Location
       
12-04 7:39 PM Ambulance Assist Wasco
12-06 11:03 AM Camp Trailer on Fire Rufus Landing
12-10 10:39 AM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 108
12-10 3:11 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 111 & 112
12-11 7:55 AM Ambulance Assist McDonalds in Biggs
12-12 8:42 PM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 7
12-17 10:14 AM Ambulance Assist Wasco


January 2017

Date Time Incident Location
       
1-03 11:48 AM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 7
1-03 7:40 PM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 10
1-05 3:55 PM Motor Vehicle Crash McPherson & Fulton in Wasco
1-07 2:33 PM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 43
1-08 5:00 PM Assist Ambulance I-84  MP# 110
1-10 3:17 PM Assist Ambulance Wasco
1-12 5:04 PM Assist Ambulance Wasco
1-22 5:02 PM Propane Leak Pilot in Biggs
1-23 8:45 AM Ambulance Assist Rufus
1-23 11:44 PM Rope & Ice Rescue I-84  MP# 108
1-25 1:10 PM Assist Ambulance I-84  MP# 113
1-27 4:30 PM Vehicle Fire I-84  MP# 109
1-28 9:45 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 109

2. Sherman County FFA Seeks Volunteers for Career Development Event, Feb. 22

FFA1Sherman County FFA is looking for volunteers to help out with the Central Oregon District FFA Books Career Development Event. We are looking for help from the community to evaluate FFA members’ record books, Chapter FFA Books and to judge career development activities. We may also need help serving food to students. The event will be hosted in Wasco at the old Elementary School. The event will be between 8:30 a.m. and 12:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 22nd. If interested please contact Mr. Collins jcollins@sherman.k12.or.us.


3. Sherman County Book Club, Feb. 15

books.loveSherman County Public/School Library book club meeting Wednesday, February 15 at 6:00pm. Please join us for tea, dessert, and discussion of “Snow Flower and the Secret Fan” by Lisa See.

 

 


4. “Sticks in Stacks” at Sherman County Public/School Library, Feb. 16

lana-architetto-francesc-01“Sticks in Stacks” at Sherman County Public/School Library Thursday, February 16:
Social crafting and instruction for knit, crochet, and spinning starts at 6:00 p.m. every Thursday. All fiber arts are welcome.  For further information about this program please contact Sherman County Public/School Library at (541) 565-3279 or email aphelps@sherman.k12.or.us.


5. Sherman County Driver Education Parent/Student/Teacher Night, Feb. 23

Parent/Student/Teacher Night – Thursday February 23, 2017  5:30 – 8:00 p.m. in the Sherman County Library Conference Room. Dinner will be served 5:30 – 6:00 p.m.

Class 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

The Student must have an Oregon Instruction Permit by February 23, 2017 and bring a copy of their permit to the Parent/Student/Teacher Night.

$75.00 fee for the class.

Class will start March 6, 2017 and go to June 1, 2017 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. The date of the class start day was changed due to state playoffs.

To print out a form you may go to the Sherman County website and click on Government then click on Driver Education or Forms may also be picked up and dropped off at the Sherman County High School Office.

For more information contact:

Paula King

Sherman County Driver Education

Coordinator/Instructor

541-333-2735 


 6. Public Notice: Sherman County Planning Commission Hearings (2), Feb. 27

ShermanCoLogoPUBLIC NOTICE
The Sherman County Planning Commission will hold two public hearings, Monday, February 27, 2017 beginning at 5:30 P.M. at the Steve Burnet Extension and Research Building Conference Room, 66365 Lonerock Rd. Moro, Oregon.

The purpose of the first hearing is to consider a Partition and Conditional Use Permit for a non-farm parcel and non-farm dwelling in the Exclusive Farm Use Zone. The project is proposed by Jesse and Kirky Stutzman and is located approximately 9 miles east of Wasco, Oregon on Emigrant Springs Road and described by the Sherman County Assessors maps as T2N, R18E, Section 27, Tax Lot 6700, Sherman County, Oregon.

PLANNING REGULATIONS
The regulations regarding this proposal is in the Sherman County Zoning Ordinance Article 3, Section 3.1, Conditional Uses Permitted, (n) A single family residential dwelling, including a manufactured home, not provided in conjunction with farm use, may be established on a lot or parcel, i.e. non-farm dwellings, subject to approval in accordance with the applicable provisions set forth in ORS 215.284.

The second hearing is to consider a Partition and Conditional Use Permit for a reservoir and well site for the Biggs Service District municipal water system project. The project is proposed by the Biggs Service District and currently owned by Pat and Lori Beers. The proposed site will be .59 acres and located south of Biggs Junction, and described by the Sherman County Assessors maps as 2N,16E08D, Section 8, Tax Lot 1500, Sherman County, Oregon.

PLANNING REGULATIONS
The regulations regarding this proposal is in the Sherman County Zoning Ordinance Article 3, Section 3.3, Conditional Uses Permitted, (e) Utility facilities necessary for public service.

All interested parties wishing to speak for or against the proposals are urged to attend. The Planning Commission may take one of the following actions upon conclusion of public testimony; deny, table, or recess the hearing to a set time and place. Failure of an issue to be raised in the hearing, in person or by letter, or failure to provide sufficient specificity to afford the decision maker an opportunity to respond to the issue precludes appeal based on that issue.

Copies of the proposal and other related information is available for review at the Sherman County Planning Department, 66365 Lonerock Rd., Moro, Oregon, during business hours. A copy of the staff report will available for inspection prior to the hearing. Copies will be provided at a reasonable cost.

Written testimony or questions may be directed to the Sherman County Planning Department, P.O. Box 381, Moro, Oregon 97039 or by phoning (541) 565-3601.The location of the hearing is accessible to the disabled. Please contact Georgia Macnab of the Sherman County Planning Department at the number listed above if you need any special accommodations to attend or participate in the hearing.
Times listed are for guidance only.


7. Hard winter results in more wildlife on the road

deer3        JOHN DAY – Eastern and central Oregon’s harsh winter season has not only resulted in more snow and ice on the roadway, but it has also contributed to numerous vehicle-wildlife collisions. Exact figures are not available at this time, but both the Oregon Department of Transportation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife indicate the number of deer and other wildlife on and near roadways is higher than usual.

“Deeper snow in the mountains brings more animals further down into valley areas,” said Randy Lewis, ODFW Assistant District Wildlife biologist. “They are looking for the easiest path that will use the least amount of energy as they search for food.”

The path of least resistance may include sections of highways or other transportation routes. In some cases high snow berms along road shoulders have created corridors where animals get trapped.

“The banks of snow are sometimes so steep on the sides of the road that deer panic and kind of ping pong back and forth, looking for a place to escape,” Lewis said.      “Motorists who don’t slow way down are likely to strike animals in these situations.”

Some travelers who express concern about wildlife on the roadway often request more wildlife crossing signs. ODOT says that wildlife warning signs are not very effective at reducing the number of crashes.

“We have numerous wildlife warning signs, including two new signs with flashing lights that the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife installed last year along U.S. 20 between Vale and Juntura,” said ODOT District 14 Assistant Manager Jeff Berry.

Unfortunately, motorists have a tendency to become complacent and ignore signs if there are too many of them, or forget about them within a minute or two, especially if they don’t see an associated danger near the sign.

Both ODOT and ODFW agree that the key to avoiding a collision with deer, elk or other critters is to stay alert and be prepared, particularly during early morning and late afternoon.

“The best advice is to slow down and keep a keen eye on the road, especially around dusk and dawn when many animals are on the move,” Lewis said. “Travelers should also take extra care on curvy highways and routes with trees or other vegetation that limit your ability to see ahead.”

If you not expecting wildlife on the roadway, you should. They can be just about anywhere in eastern and central Oregon.

Deer typically travel in groups so if you see one slow down and watch out for others. Don’t expect them to do the logical thing, either. Too often deer crossing the highway will unexpectedly reverse direction when they reach the opposite site, heading straight into your moving vehicle.

“Think about what action you would need to take if a deer or elk suddenly bolted across your path,” said Berry. “Keeping wildlife in mind, paying extra attention and slowing down will help you avoid a collision with an animal on the road.”

          Special wildlife crossing

In some cases grade-separated wildlife crossings have been constructed to channel animals over or under busy highways, typically using large culverts or bridge-like structures.

“Wildlife crossings were installed along sections of U.S. 97 south of Bend and on the new stretch of U.S. 20 between Pioneer Mountain and Eddyville,” Lewis said. “Other sites are being evaluated, but conditions have to be just right for them to work.”

In eastern Oregon there are few sites that meet the criteria for a dedicated, grade-separated wildlife crossing. At this time there are no plans to build any in the area.

“We will continue to look for ways to help reduce vehicle crashes with wildlife, but we mainly rely on motorists doing their part by keeping mindful that wild animals are going to be on our roadways at times,” said Lewis.

For more information about ODOT’s wildlife crossing program, plus links to videos and related driving tips https://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/HWY/REGION4/Pages/WildlifeCrossings.aspx .


8. The Danger in the Familiar

There is great comfort in the familiar. There is great danger, as well.

Most of us feel secure in the belief that we can trust the familiar in our lives, and we feel that there is comfort and peace in the predictable. Actually, while this is true to some degree, it can also be a trap.

You see, it is the unfamiliar, the risk, and the unpredictable that liberates us from boredom, unleashes our creative spirit, and enlivens our relationships. And it is the unplanned and unknown occurrences that make our life rich in possibilities.

Of course, some order, predictability and security are necessary for our survival and sanity. But a life without mystery, excitement and a little risk is merely an existence. Life was meant to be lived – joyfully, with a sense of wonder and surprise.

So take some time to think about it. How much of your life is planned down to the last minute? How much of your free time is completely controlled by a tight schedule? Why not try relaxing and just letting things happen without trying to plan or control them?

The world is full of delight, if you will only allow it to unfold naturally around you. It is surprise and spontaneity that keep us and our relationships from becoming dried out, locked up and eventually numbed and even deadened by repetitive daily routines. ~ The Pacific Institute


 

Advertisements