Sherman County eNews #58

 CONTENT

  1. “Sticks in Stacks” at Sherman County Public/School Library, March 2

  2. Jeff Merkley’s Town Hall in Rufus, March 4

  3. Regional History Forum: “Now Playing at the Vogt,” March 4

  4. Sherman County Public/School Library Book Club, March 15

  5. Sherman County Courthouse Groundbreaking and Open House, March 8

  6. Jean (Zevely) Anderson’s Blog: The May Ranch, Grass Valley, Dayville & Silvies

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. “Sticks in Stacks” at Sherman County Public/School Library, March 2

sewKnitsheep“Sticks in Stacks” at Sherman County Public/School Library Thursday, March 2:  Social crafting starts at 6:00 p.m. every Thursday. Instructional assistance for knit, crochet, and spinning will be available at 7:00 p.m. Bring your knitting, crochet, spinning, quilting, or cross-stitch projects. All fiber arts are welcome.
For further information about this program please contact Sherman County Public/School Library at (541) 565-3279 or email shermanlibrary@sherman.k12.or.us.


 2. Jeff Merkley’s Town Hall in Rufus, March 4

American flag2This Saturday, March 4th, I’ll be hosting a town hall at Bob’s Texas T-Bone and Frosty’s in Rufus. I invite all Sherman County residents to come and discuss what we need to do to strengthen our state and our nation. Also, if you are running into red tape accessing veterans’ benefits or dealing with Social Security or Medicare, or having trouble getting what you need from other federal agencies, I will have a constituent services worker on hand who may be able to help.

What:
Sherman County Town Hall

When:
Saturday, March 4th, 2017
3:00 PM

Where:
Bob’s Texas T-Bone and Frosty’s, Event Room
101 First St.
Rufus, OR 97050


3. Regional History Forum: “Now Playing at the Vogt,” March 4

drama1The program on the Vogt Grand Theatre postponed because of snow in early February will be held next Saturday.  “Now Playing at the Vogt:  The Dalles’ Forgotten Opera House” is the theme of a presentation Saturday, Mar. 4, by local historian Karl Vercouteren.  It takes place in the upstairs courtroom of the 1859 Original Courthouse, 410 W. 2nd Place in The Dalles.

The program begins at 1:30 p.m.  This is the last program of the 2017 Regional History Forum series.  There is a TV monitor on the ground floor of the 1859 courthouse to serve those unable to climb the stairs.  Coffee and cookies will be served after the program.


4. Sherman County Public/School Library Book Club, March 15

Sherman County Public/School Library Book Club will meet Wednesday, March 15 at 6:00pm. Please join us for tea, dessert, and discussion of “The Beach House” by Mary Alice Monroe. To request a hold call 541-565-3279 or email shermanlibrary@sherman.k12.or.us.


5. Sherman County Courthouse Groundbreaking and Open House, March 8

ShermanCoLogo
The public is invited to attend the official Sherman County Courthouse Addition and Renovation Groundbreaking Ceremony and Open House to be held Wednesday, March 8th at 1:30 pm at the Sherman County Courthouse in Moro. A brief groundbreaking ceremony will take place in front of the Courthouse to be followed by an open house in the Circuit Courtroom upstairs. Attendees will have an opportunity to meet with project team members to learn about the project scope and timeline, review floor plans, see examples of interior and exterior finishes, and enjoy refreshments.


6. Jean (Zevely) Anderson’s Blog: Ancestors, The May Ranch, Tygh Valley, Grass Valley, Dayville & Silvies

typewriterAre you thinking about writing your life story? You might want to see Jean (Zevely) Anderson’s Blog with short pieces about Ancestors, The May Ranch, Tygh Valley, Grass Valley, Dayville & Silvies. “I grew up on a ranch bordering the tiny town of Grass Valley, Oregon.  I was not a dainty girl. I was a breakneck kid, a trait that has permeated my entire life.  Having narrowly survived childhood, adolescence, marriage, children, and divorce, I went back to school in my thirties and fulfilled an early dream by getting a degree in architecture. This combination, plus a second marriage to an artist/adventurer/sailor, led to an interesting life. Over the years, I have written a collection of autobiographical vignettes progressing from early childhood through my sixties. I’m calling this collection MY LIFE FROM Z TO A, having started with the name of Zevely and ended as Anderson.” It begins here: http://www.mylifefromztoa.com/.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeAngela Swedberg, Artist  http://www.stoningtongallery.com/artistselect.php?fn=Angela&ln=Swedberg&artist=146&artType=0&topic=bio 

Travel the Underground Railroad, Slavery & Harriet Tubman  https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/02/24/travel/underground-railroad-slavery-harriet-tubman-byway-maryland.html?emc=edit_th_20170226&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=35377422&_r=1 

Cirque Du Soleil at the Oscars in 2012 https://biggeekdad.com/2014/01/cirque-du-soleil-oscars/ 

Why the UN Deck Is Stacked against Israel http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2017/02/why_the_un_deck_is_stacked_against_israel.html

The True Size of Africa http://brilliantmaps.com/size-of-africa/

How to Fact Check Fake News  https://www.facebook.com/georgehtakei/videos/vb.205344452828349/10154592016416939/?type=2&theater

Oregon’s winter of 2016-17 won’t soon be forgotten http://www.oregonlive.com/weather/index.ssf/2017/02/oregons_winter_of_2016-17_wont.html

20 Ingenious Animal Crossings From Around the World http://www.ba-bamail.com/content.aspx?emailid=24796

50 State Road Trip: Small Towns in Every State  http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/experience/america/fifty-states/2017/01/17/scenic-small-towns-50-states/96557870/

How Much Oil is Left? | Peak Energy & Resources, Climate Change, and the Preservation of Knowledge http://energyskeptic.com/2016/how-much-oil-is-left/

Economic growth: How it works; how it fails; why wealth disparity occurs | Our Finite World https://ourfiniteworld.com/2015/12/08/economic-growth-how-it-works-how-it-fails-why-wealth-disparity-occurs/


 

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Sherman County eNews #57

CONTENT

  1. Urban-Rural Gathering: Melting Mountains, March 4

  2. Kids, Free Admission, Columbia Gorge Discovery Center Activities, March 25-April 23

  3. Conversation is a Two-Way Street – Part 2 Parents and Teens

  4. Sherman High School Track Schedule

  5. Sherman High School Baseball Schedule

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


 1. Urban-Rural Gathering: Melting Mountains, March 4

Sherman County was selected by a group from Seattle wanting to learn more about the differences between rural and urban areas. The primary mover was the recent elections where Seattlites voted 74% for Hillary Clinton while Sherman County voted 74% for Donald Trump.

We are looking for 12-15 Sherman County folks willing to meet with the urban group from Washington on Saturday, March 4 at the OSU Extension Office in Moro. The Sherman County participants are asked to be there at 11:30 a.m. The Seattle group will be treated to a short tour of the County then return to the Extension office where they will join Sherman County folks for a lunch and discussion to learn about the factors that lead to differences. Because of travel rules for their driver, they will need to leave about 3 p.m.

Persons wishing to contribute a few hours from 11:30 to 3 p.m. are asked to contact the Extension Office (541-565-3230). Lunch will be provided for all and it will be interesting to see where and why the regions seem to differ.


2. Kids, Free Admission, Columbia Gorge Discovery Center Activities, March 25-April 23

Kids receive free museum admission during Oregon and Washington Spring Break with paid adult admission from March 25 through April 23 at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles, Oregon. Enjoy the Kids Explorer room craft activities, and a fun scavenger hunt. See the new Chinatown exhibit, and live raptor presentations. The museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, phone (541) 296-8600 ext. 201, or visit www.gorgediscovery.org.


 3. Conversation is a Two-Way Street – Part 2 Parents and Teens

Building on yesterday’s “Conversation is a Two-Way Street,” parents of teenagers often complain that they can’t get their kids to communicate. Sometimes there are good reasons why.

Teenagers really want to be able to talk to their parents. In fact, in some cases, they’re dying because they can’t. A large number of teens who commit suicide are those who feel they can’t talk to either parent, and their feelings of loneliness, isolation and despair take over. (Take a moment and remember how the major issues of your life become much smaller and easier to manage when you can get them out in the open and talk about them.)

Parents, without realizing it, do things that stop their teen-aged children from confiding in them. What sorts of things? Well, they interrupt to give reprimands and lectures instead of just listening, giving support and saving the moral lesson for another time. Or, they discount what the teen is feeling by making it seem trivial or unimportant, especially when compared to the grown-up responsibilities parents must cope with.

If you catch yourself behaving in these ways when your teenagers try to talk with you, perhaps it’s time to stop and apologize, or at least clear the air. Your teenager will appreciate your efforts to change your behavior to gain a closer relationship, and he or she will give you another chance – maybe not on the spot, but soon.

If your communications have broken down completely, a few visits to a good family therapist can help get you back on track. Few things in life are as important as your relationship with your children, whatever their ages. Why not make it as good as it can possibly be?


4. Sherman High School Track Schedule

Time would seem to be a finite commodity, but investing some of it in the children around us pays dividends for a very long time. ~ The Pacific Institute

 2017 Sherman High School Track 

February 22, 2017

Date Day Opponent Site Time
         
March 4 Sat HRV Learn By Doing Clinic Hood River 8:00
         
March 18 Sat Estacada Small School Inv. Estacada 10:00
         
March 23 Thurs Buck Track Classic Pendleton 11:00
         
April 8 Sat Dick Horyna Inv. Stanfield 10:00
         
April 14 Fri Rivers Edge The Dalles 12:00
         
April 21 Fri Bruin Invite White Salmon TBD
         
April 22 Sat 11th Annual Pepsi Inv. Union 11:00
         
April 29 Sat Nike Sherman Inv. Moro 11:00
         
May 6 Sat Madras Inv. Madras TBD
         
May 13 Sat 1A District 3 Championships Moro 10:30
         

Coach:  Kyle Pfeifer                Asst. Coaches:             Samantha Coons, Ethan Moore, Kristin Whitley

Supt.:  Wes Owens                 Principal:  Bill Blevins                              AD:  Gary Lewis 


 5. Sherman High School Baseball Schedule 

DATE DAY OPPONENT SITE TIME
         
March 17 Friday St. Paul SCS 11:00 DH
         
March 30 –April 1 Thurs-Sat Grant Union Invitational John Day TBA DH
         
April 8 Saturday Heppner v SCS 11:00 DH
         
April 11 Tuesday Weston McEwen v Athena 2:00 DH
         
April 15 Saturday Union v SCS 11:00 DH
         
April 18 Tuesday Pilot Rock v Pilot Rock 2:00 DH
         
April 22 Saturday Grant Union v SCS 11:00 DH
         
April 25 Tuesday Culver v SCS 2:00 DH
         
May 6 Saturday Dufur v Dufur 11:00 DH
         
May 13 Saturday Elgin v Elgin 11:00 DH
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         

 

v = League Game

                        DH = Double Header

   Head Coach: Joe Justesen                      Asst.: Shawn Troutman            

   AD/Principal (SJSHS): Gary Lewis        AD (CHS): Ron Kopp

   AD/Principal (AHS): Kevin Hunking       Principal (CHS): Michelle Geer           


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbResearch at the Edge of the Pacific  http://oregonprogress.oregonstate.edu/winter-2017/research-edge-pacific

Willamette Water http://oregonprogress.oregonstate.edu/winter-2017/willamette-water-2100 

Tracing the Movement of Water http://oregonprogress.oregonstate.edu/winter-2017/tracing-movement-water 

The spillover effect of dams on salmon http://oregonprogress.oregonstate.edu/winter-2017/spillover-effect-dams-salmon

Media Ignoring Major Cyber Security Breach on Capitol Hill  http://www.larslarson.com/media-ignoring-major-cyber-security-breach-capitol-hill/

Deputies skirt state rules to help ICE deport suspects http://www.pamplinmedia.com/pt/9-news/346410-225988-deputies-skirt-state-rules-to-help-ice-deport-suspects

Eastern Oregon would get economic boost from bipartisan bill http://www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/02/eastern_oregon_would_get_econo.html#incart_river_home

Waiting for Justice Gorsuch https://www.wsj.com/articles/waiting-for-justice-gorsuch-1487893991

Capital Chatter: The geometry of gerrymandering http://oregoncapitalinsider.com/oci/766-226577-capital-chatter-the-geometry-of-gerrymandering?utm_source=Oregon+Capital+Insider&utm_campaign=912219ad41-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_02_24&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_362d804414-912219ad41-233864753

Gerrymandering  https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/01/13/this-is-actually-what-america-would-look-like-without-gerrymandering/?utm_term=.c799db07fa86


 

Sherman County eNews #56

CONTENTS

  1. Spiritual Matters

  2. Classifieds

  3. Calendar


1. Spiritual Matters

church.family1Holiday

The word “holiday” stems from the words “holy” and “day.”  God instituted 7 holy days or feasts (Leviticus 23:1-44), conveying an important spiritual message through each one.

Spring/summer feasts already fulfilled spiritually:

Passover (1 Corinthians 5:7).  Passover involved the sacrifice of an unblemished (perfect) lamb, and the use of the lamb’s blood to cause death to “pass over” (avoid) God’s people.  This is a foreshadowing of Jesus being sacrificed as the Lamb of God, to save God’s people from eternal death.

Feast of Unleavened Bread (1 Corinthians 5:8). In the Bible, leaven (yeast) always represents sin.  This feast reminds us that Jesus, who was without sin, took our sins to the grave.  Jesus is the (unleavened) Bread of Life (John 6:35).

Feast of First Fruits (1 Corinthians 15:20).  When Jesus was raised from the dead, He became a first fruits offering to God, and His resurrection assures us that we also will conquer death through Him.

Pentecost (Acts 2).  Just as Jesus had promised (John 14:16-17), fifty days after He was resurrected, the Holy Spirit came upon a group of disciples, and the Christian Church was born.  All Christians are indwelled by the Holy Spirit, and are commanded to share the Gospel of Jesus Christ with others.

Fall feasts not yet fulfilled spiritually:

Feast of Trumpets.  Many believe this end of harvest feast will mark the return of Jesus to take his (Christian) church/bride home in an event known as the rapture, which we will discuss later.

Day of Atonement.  Also known as the 7 year tribulation period, God will provide this time for Israel to become atoned (saved).

Feast of Tabernacles (tents).  After the 7 years, Jesus and believers, will return to earth (Second Coming of Christ) to dwell for 1000 years (Millennial Reign of Christ).

God bless,

Jill Harrison

Wasco Methodist Church 


 2. Classifieds (new or corrected)

clock.793POLICY. FRIDAY CLASSIFIEDS:

Sherman County eNews publishes free classified ads on Fridays, deadline Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, how, why… and, the final Friday date for posting your ad (for example, 10/18), and contact information; under 50 words if possible, and limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Share your Joyful News and Thank You and Congratulatory notes here. ~ The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

JOYFUL NEWS! [births, birthdays, engagements, weddings & anniversaries]

February 25th: HAPPY BIRTHDAY, SHERMAN COUNTY! 1889-2017

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

EMPLOYMENT:

RETAIL CLERK/WAREHOUSE WORKER. Mid Columbia Producers (MCP) is seeking applicants to join our team as a full time retail clerk/warehouse worker. Our Farm Stores sell a variety of products from animal food and supplies, fencing and automotive products to household items and clothing. This position will be based out of either Wasco, The Dalles, or Goldendale, Washington. The reporting location will be negotiable upon hire.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities include but are not limited to:

 Cashier-Process customer orders

 Maintenance of the facilities

 Sell products and provide product information

 Carry out and load farm store merchandise

 Stock Farm Store with merchandise warehoused or stored in the lot or warehouse

 Clean and rearrange merchandise as needed

 Open and close store, lot and warehouse areas

 Pick up orders from vendors

 Deliver merchandise to Farm Store customers

 Load and unload bales of straw, hay and feed

Requirements:

 Lift, carry, push, or pull objects up to approximately 100 lbs.

 Must possess basic computer knowledge and be able to navigate with little assistance

 Must be able to accommodate a varying work schedule

 Operate with initiative, commitment, strong work ethic & sense of urgency

 Accurate and comfortable with math and currency

 Valid Driver’s License

 Must be able to operate a vehicle with a GVW of 10,000 lbs. or more, with or without a trailer in tow

 Will be required to work in all weather conditions

Schedule: Schedule varies, store hours of operation will be Monday – Saturday 7:30 – 5:30. Shifts are assigned as deemed necessary.

Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR.

As a prominent agribusiness company, we offer a competitive salary and benefits package. Including health insurance premiums currently paid 100% for the employee and their dependents, dental, vision and Rx coverage, 401k with company match, robust profit sharing plan, paid vacation, sick, holidays, and more.

Applications are available for download at http://www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Please send cover letter, application and resume to:

Mid Columbia Producers  Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039.

PH: (541)565-2277 Fax: (503)536-6875 | Brittany@mcpcoop.com

Closing date February 28 or until filled. 2/24

GRAIN WAREHOUSE WORKERS. MCP is seeking applicants to fill multiple positions on our team as Grain Warehouse Workers.  These full time positions will be based in either Sherman or Gilliam County, negotiable upon hire.  The role of a Grain Warehouse Worker is to safely handle grain while rendering outstanding customer service to our patrons.  As an MCP employee you will have the opportunity to perform a wide variety of jobs within the department. Including but not limited to grain elevator operation, maintenance and housekeeping, barge loading, operation of tractor-trailers, inventory management and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility.

Preferred:

 Mechanical inclination, to be able to troubleshoot work on minor repairs

 Grain and/or Seed Industry knowledge

Required:

  • Ability to work well under pressure and deal tactfully with others
  • Able to conform to shifting priorities, responsibilities, strategies, demands and timelines
  • Strong personal and customer service skills. Good verbal and written communication skills
  • Must be able to climb ladders and work at heights up to 200 ft.
  • Periodically perform heavy labor
  • Be able to qualify for use of a dust and mist respirator
  • Valid Driver’s license
  • The ability to obtain a chemical applicators license with space fumigation endorsement

Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR.

As a prominent agribusiness company, we offer a competitive salary and benefits package. Including health insurance premiums currently paid 100% for the employee and their dependents, dental, vision and Rx coverage, 401k with company match, robust profit sharing plan, paid vacation, sick, holidays, and more. Closing date: March 3, 2017. Mid Columbia Producers is an equal opportunity employer.

Applications are available for download at http://www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Please send cover letter, application and resume to:

Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039 Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277 Brittany@mcpcoop.com  3/3

CHILDCARE ASSISANT TEACHER. IMMEDIATE JOB OPENING – Childcare Assistant Teacher. Little Wheats Daycare, Moro, OR. Flexible, part time hours 20-25 hours/week. For more information, requirements and application please call Kelsey at 541-565-3152, or stop by 409 Dewey Street between 7:30 a.m. and 12 p.m. M-TH to pick up an application. Must be able to pass a background check. Pay dependent on experience and educational background. OPEN UNTIL FILLED.

SEASONAL PARK RANGER. Cottonwood Canyon State Park, in-between Wasco and Condon, is seeking a Park Ranger 1 from April 1 to Oct. 31st. Cottonwood is 16,000 acres on 12 miles of the John Day River with a 21-site primitive campground. Ranger will work with two other staff focused on: fun, irrigation; mowing, rule enforcement, interpretation, facilities maintenance, cleaning and vegetation restoration, including hand pulling weeds. Seeing black widows, rattlesnakes, big horn sheep and osprey is not uncommon. Applicants must be willing to work in a remote setting safely; work both independently and in a team; work in adverse conditions—100 degree plus weather; and have a high degree of flexibility. Experience in one or more of the work focus areas, as outlined above, is required. Salary: $2,874.00 – $3,943.00 Monthly plus benefits; position closes 02/28/2017. For more info, e-mail Ranger David Spangler at david.spangler@oregon.gov. Apply on-line at:https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/oregon/jobs/1649126/seasonal-park-ranger-1-cottonwood-canyon-state-park  2/24

PART-TIME POSITION – The City of Moro is now accepting applications for a seasonal part-time position of Assistant Maintenance Worker. This position requires an individual to be able to perform work including: construction and repair of sewer and water pipelines; operation of trucks and other power-driven equipment and tools; general maintenance of streets, sidewalks, parks and buildings; and other related work as required.  Applications are available at Moro City Hall located at 104 First Street, Moro, Oregon, and may be picked up between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Tuesday or Wednesday, and 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Monday or Thursday.  All applications must be returned to Moro City Hall no later than 3:00 p.m. Tuesday, February 28, 2017.  For more information, contact Kya Mabe at 541-565-3535. 2/24

FOR SALE:

COMMERCIAL AIRBNB, BOARDING HOUSE. $300,000. Willing to finance. 908 Clark Street, Wasco, OR 97065. 7 beds, 5 baths. Listing ID 24093966. The Just Us Inn is being run as an Airbnb and a boarding house. It has retained full occupancy since 2013. There is a 1 bedroom suite, with bathroom, and an additional 2 two bedroom suites. There is a large unfinished third floor space. On the property there are: two RV hook-up spaces, a community garden, a rental manufactured home. This property features room for development with sewer and electric ready to hook up. This property features four commercial lots. The owner is willing to carry contract, with substantial down payment, at an attractive rate. Hotel is three stories. The first floor has approx. 1500 square ft., large living room, kitchen, dining area, laundry area, and 1.5 baths. The Just Us Inn is completely furnished with antiques and collectibles. The second floor has 5 guest rooms, storage room, studio apartment, 2.5 baths and also completely furnished and beautifully decorated. The 3rd floor is unfinished but plumbed and wired.         An historical property, (The Old Oskaloosa Hotel) Just Us Inn, is located in Sherman County, Oregon, at the heart of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area; a land where time stands still. Sherman County is bordered to the north by the mighty Columbia River, world renowned for salmon & sturgeon fishing; to the east by the John Day River with exceptional steelhead & warm water bass fishing; and to the west by the Deschutes River, most of which is designated as Federal Wild, Scenic River, and State Scenic Waterway. People are drawn to the area to fly fish on world class rivers, white water rafting, windsurfing, golfing, hiking, mountain biking, all while enjoying the natural beauty that has become synonymous with the region. –Debbie Doherty 503-515-7374         3/24 
 :: PRICE REDUCED:: GORGE OUTFITTERS SUPPLY ::  $25,000 (terms available)

102 East 1st Street Rufus Oregon. MLS # 16657334. 1800 Sq Ft Commercial Building / Premium location / Continual Growth. The area’s only full season recreation retail sporting goods store. Great income, awesome location, well known in the entire area as a destination location for recreation supplies for the world class fishing that abounds. Strategically located on the mighty Columbia, on I-84 at exit 109, and in between the mouths of the Deschutes and John Day rivers. Sales have increased every year since established in 2011. New POS for tracking inventory and sales. Services include: ODFW licensing agent and FFL dealer. ATM machine generates $150-$300 month on average. An additional portion of the building could be opened for additional retail square footage potentially for  Kite Boarding and Wind Surfing supplies. This is a first class establishment. Signage has been created by the PNW best sign company and constructed of high quality material. This is a turn key operation with plenty of great vendor support.
Purchase price includes the following: (business only)
* All retail furnishings, gondolas, freezers, refrigerators, coolers, shelving, safes, ATM
* Included in the sale is the name Gorge Outfitters Supply, all the marketing media, signage, intellect, Facebook platform and current relationships with vendors and customers.

* Wholesale cost of current inventory to be added to purchase price at time of sale. (Currently about 42k sold for cash only) Priced aggressively current inventory retails near 75k. Building can be leased at $850 month or purchased with terms for $115,000.
Contact Dan Pehlke for additional information 503-547-9140
Licensed Oregon Principal Broker for Cheri Belander Real Estate 3/3

SERVICES: [home, personal, appliance, landscape, fencing, cleaning, maintenance, janitorial, computer, construction, sewing, repairs, transportation, media, preschool, day care, support & training]

THE TIMES-JOURNAL E-MAIL SUBSCRIPTION. An e-mail subscription costs $30 for Gilliam, Sherman & Wheeler counties and $40 for all other subscriptions.  The print version costs $35/year for Giliam, Sherman & Wheeler counties, $45 for all other subscriptions. The Times-Journal, a weekly newspaper serves Wheeler, Gilliam & Sherman counties. Contact: P.O. Box 746, Condon, OR 97823 | 541-384-2411 times-journal@jncable.com . 2/24

SHERMAN COUNTY AGRI-BUSINESS DIRECTORY. To add or update your business listing, please contact Sherman County Administrative Assistant Lauren Hernandez lhernandez@co.sherman.or.us. See businesses organized by town at http://www.co.sherman.or.us/agri_business.asp. 0/0

NEWSPAPERS

FREE:

VISITOR INFORMATION SERVICES & EVENTS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

EXCHANGE STUDENT HOST FAMILY.  Non-Profit Organization is Seeking Local Host Families for High School Exchange Students. ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with your community high school, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few. ASSE students are enthusiastic and excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience. The exchange students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests.  To become an ASSE Host Family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call the ASSE Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or go to www.host.asse.com to begin your host family application. Students are eager to learn about their American host family, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter today! ASSE INTERNATIONAL (FORMERLY AMERICAN SCANDINAVIAN STUDENT EXCHANGE) IS A NON-PROFIT, PUBLIC BENEFIT ORGANIZATION.  ASSE IS OFFICIALLY DESIGNATED AS AN EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM BY THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, WAS FOUNDED BY THE SWEDISH MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, COOPERATES WITH THE CANADIAN PROVINCIAL MINISTRIES OF EDUCATION,  and the NEW ZEALAND DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 3/31

Sherman County Notice of Board Vacancy: North Central Public Health District Budget Committee. Notice is hereby given that the Sherman County Court is accepting names of individuals interested in filling a vacant community position to represent Sherman County as a member of the North Central Public Health District Budget Committee. The appointee will be expected to attend meetings and be an active committee member.  Persons interested in serving should contact the Sherman County Court at P.O. Box 365, 500 Court Street, Moro, OR 97039, 541-565-3416 or lhernandez@co.sherman.or.us . 3/3

Sherman County Notice of Board Vacancy: Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Budget Committee. Notice is hereby given that the Sherman County Court is accepting names of individuals interested in filling a vacant community position to represent Sherman County as a member of the Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Budget Committee. The appointee will be expected to attend meetings and be an active committee member.  Persons interested in serving should contact the Sherman County Court at P.O. Box 365, 500 Court Street, Moro, OR 97039, 541-565-3416 or lhernandez@co.sherman.or.us . 3/3

WANTED:

OLD DOORS PRE-1950s. Want to buy old doors with or w/o windows, all sizes. Wanting them for outside deck patio fence. Call Ree Ella at 541-980-8678.  3/10

FIREWOOD.  A veteran in our community is in need of firewood. Please call or text Bonnie 541-777-7731 or Leta Ann 541-325-2993. Thank you in advance for your help and thoughtfulness. 2/24

LOST OR FOUND: 

FOR RENT:


3. Calendar (new or corrected) 

FEBRUARY

23-March 1 National Association of Counties Conference, Washington, DC

24 Frontier Digital Network Budget Committee Meeting 1:30 Condon

24 Sherman County Huskies vs North Clackamas Christian 6:30 Sherman County School

25 Happy Birthday, Sherman County! February 25, 1889

25 Happy Birthday, Gilliam County! 1885

25 Regional History Forum, Thos. Condon & Paleontology 1:30 Original Courthouse

26 Mud Springs Gospel Band 6 p.m. Kent Baptist Church

27 Sherman Experiment Station Liaison Meeting 10 Burnet Building

27 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10 The Dalles

27 Sherman County Planning Commission Hearings 5:30

27 Sherman County Photography Club 7-9 Sherman County Public/School Library

28 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board Meeting 1-3 The Dalles

MARCH

1 Sherman County Court will not be in session.

1-4 State Class 1A Basketball Tournament, Baker City

4 Urban-Rural Gathering: Melting Mountains 12-3 Sherman OSU Extension Office

4 Sen. Merkley Local Leaders Meeting 2:30 Rufus City Hall

4 Sen. Merkley Town Hall 3 Frosty’s in Rufus

6  Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation Meeting 10-12 Rufus

8 Courthouse Facilities Groundbreaking Ceremony 1:30 Courthouse

8 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Committee 12:30

11 First Baptist Church Spring Fling 6 Grass Valley

12 Daylight Saving Time Begins

14 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation Board 8:30 Moro

14 Sherman County Watershed Council 11:30

14 Tri-County Mental Health Board 11-2 The Dalles

14 North Central Public Health District Board 9 The Dalles

15 Book Club 6 Sherman County Public/School Library

15 Sherman County Senior Center St. Patrick’s Silent Auction 12

15 Sherman County Court 9 Burnet Building

17 ST. PATRICK’S DAY

18 Maryhill Museum Opening Celebration 10-5

20 Spring Begins

23 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board Meeting 4 Klickitat County

25 Job Fair 10-2 Columbia Gorge Community College

27 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board 11 The Dalles

28 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments 1-3 The Dalles

30 Sherman County Court Special Session 10

APRIL

5 Sherman County Court 9

5 Incredible Years Parenting Series 5-7 Moro Community Presbyterian Church

10 Sherman County School District Board Meeting 7 Library

11 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Meeting 8:30 Moro

11 Sherman County Watershed Council Meeting 11:30 Burnet Building, Moro

11 Tri-County Mental Health Board 11-2 The Dalles

11 North Central Public Health District Board 3 The Dalles

12 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Group 12:30 Senior Center

12 Incredible Years Parenting Series 5-7 Moro Community Presbyterian Church

16 EASTER

19 Sherman County Court 9

19 Incredible Years Parenting Series 5-7 Moro Community Presbyterian Church

22 EARTH DAY

24 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority 10 The Dalles

25 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board Meeting 1-3 The Dalles

26 Tri-County Courts 10 Condon

26 Incredible Years Parenting Series 5-7 Moro Community Presbyterian Church

26-27 Oregon Heritage Summit on Funding  

MAY

3 Incredible Years Parenting Series 5-7 Moro Community Presbyterian Church

10 Incredible Years Parenting Series 5-7 Moro Community Presbyterian Church

14 MOTHERS’ DAY

17 Incredible Years Parenting Series 5-7 Moro Community Presbyterian Church

20 ARMED FORCES DAY

20-21 Equine Mania Cow Sorting Clinic, Wasco

29 MEMORIAL DAY

JUNE

14 FLAG DAY

18 FATHERS’ DAY

21 Summer Begins

JULY

4 INDEPENDENCE DAY

AUGUST

12-13 Equine Mania 2-Man Advanced Cow Sorting Clinic, Wasco

22-27 Sherman County Fair

Sherman County eNews #55

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Huskies: 1A Round 2 State Championship, Feb. 24

  2. The Mud Springs Gospel Band & Kent Baptist Church, Feb. 26

  3. Columbia Gorge Community College Job Fair, March 25

  4. Conversation is a Two-Way Street – Part 1 Parents and Teens

  5. Columbia Gorge Community College: Web-development, Wind Challenge & Job Fair

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


 1. Sherman County Huskies: 1A Round 2 State Championship, Feb. 24

sport-basketball

Sherman County Huskies vs North Clackamas Christian

Sherman County School

6:30 on Friday, February 24th.

Come and support our District Champion Huskies as they compete for the opportunity to continue to fight for the State Title in Baker.  Go Huskies, we are proud of you!

–Audrey Rooney, Registrar , Sherman High School, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039

PH: 541-565-3500 ~ Fax: 541-565-3319


2. The Mud Springs Gospel Band & Kent Baptist Church, Feb. 26

church.family1The Mud Springs Gospel Band will be performing at Kent Baptist Church this Sunday, Feb. 26 at 6 p.m. Everyone is welcome to attend for the concert and cookies afterward!

 


3. Columbia Gorge Community College Job Fair, March 25

Date:  Saturday, March 25, 2017

Time:  10:00-2:00

Place:  Ft. Dalles Readiness and CGCC Workforce Center (Building #10 on the CGCC campus) 402 East Scenic Drive, The Dalles, Or 97058

Appropriate for job seekers age 16 and up.

Job seekers will be able to:

  • Meet face-to-face with employers
  • Get Details on career education programs
  • Learn about financial aid options
  • Se habla español

Funded through an Oregon Career Pathways grant. CGCC is partnering with The State of Oregon Employment Department to host this event.


4. Conversation is a Two-Way Street – Part 1 Parents and Teens

What should parents do if they want their teenagers to confide in them? Dr. Joyce Vedral, author of several books on the teenager-parent relationship, asked a large number of teens to answer this question, and here is what they said.

Generally, teenagers tend to feel comfortable talking with those parents with whom they can laugh and joke, parents whose understanding the teens know they can count on. When asked why they would choose one parent over another to confide in, they invariably say they choose the one who stays calm even when they, themselves, are emotional, and who never says things like, “That shouldn’t bother you.”

Here’s something else that’s critical. In our efforts to get our teenagers to talk to us, many of us neglect to talk to them – especially about how much we appreciate, love and admire them. Sometimes, we get so caught up in our efforts to keep our kids on the right track that we forget to tell them how great they are. That is a big mistake, but it’s one that can be fixed.

Nothing can be more encouraging and more conducive to building their self-esteem than you taking the time to express confidence that they have what it takes to make it in life.  They may not tell you on the spot how much your approval matters to them, but believe that it does.

And dump the guilt, if you haven’t done these things so far. That was then, this is now. There is no time like the present to start! Your kids will love you for it…even if they don’t come out and say so. ~ The Pacific Institute


5. Columbia Gorge Community College: Web-development, Wind Challenge & Job Fair

Spring is almost here and learning is already in full bloom at Columbia Gorge Community College, where March brings a newly-created certificate course in web development, 2017 Wind Challenge for middle and high school students, Job Fair and myriad other activities. Here’s the rundown:

Every business and organization needs a website, but where do you start?

Find the answers in spring term through an entry-level web development course leading to a business certificate. Students learn the fundamentals of building, launching and maintaining a website, covering such topics as HTML and XML, Javascript, graphics applications and other authoring tools. Web page standards and policies are introduced, along with elements of vector tools, user interfaces, search engines and emerging web technologies. (And if you don’t know what all that means, you will by the time you earn this certificate.)

This is an on-line course, delivered via the open-source learning platform called Moodle.

Registration for web development and other spring term classes begins March 6 for returning students and March 8 for new students. The first day of spring term is April 3.

The month of March brings many other activities to the college, as well.

Middle and high school students are invited to participate in the annual Wind Challenge, scheduled Saturday, March 11, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Fort Dalles Readiness Center, 400 East Scenic Drive, The Dalles. This event is co-sponsored by the Gorge Technology Alliance, Columbia Gorge Community College and Google.

The public is encouraged to attend as middle and high school teams learn wind turbine technology and design, then apply their skills in an all-day competition to build, test and present their operating wind turbines to a panel of judges. A hands-on STEM Fair from noon to 3:30 p.m. is free to the public. Prizes honor the three high school teams and three middle school teams whose wind turbines achieve the fastest speed for transferring kinetic energy and generate the most electrical power.

As of mid-February, 47 teams had registered, representing high schools and middle schools from Irrigon to Corbett and Stevenson to Goldendale. Mentors are still needed. If you’d like to help, please visit the website, http://crgta.org/wind-challenge, or contact event coordinator Jessica Metta or volunteer coordinator Jacque Schei, (541) 296-2266.

Finally, mark your calendars for the Spring Job Fair on Saturday, March 25, in the Fort Dalles Readiness Center. This is organized by Columbia Gorge Community College and Oregon Employment Department. Employers should register by March 11. To learn more, call Elaine Powrie, (541) 490-3462.

Columbia Gorge Community College “builds dreams and transforms lives” with credit and non-credit classes offered at campuses in Hood River and The Dalles, and on-line around the world. For details, visit cgcc.edu.


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.crow.flyWWII Camp Rufus. The Oregon Encyclopedia – with new photographs https://oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/camp_rufus/#

For you, your kids and grandkids, TED, Ideas worth sharing… The next steps in Nanotechnology http://www.ba-bamail.com/video.aspx?emailid=24753

A Changing Climate for Water http://oregonprogress.oregonstate.edu/winter-2017/changing-climate-water

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown and AG Ellen Rosenblum Blaze The Oregon Trail Of Political Patronage http://www.forbes.com/sites/adamandrzejewski/2017/02/13/blazing-the-oregon-trail-of-pinstripe-patronage-gov-kate-brown-attorney-general-ellen-rosenblum/#782dcd782318

Oregon group hits EPA chief with first suit http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/news/2017/02/23/pruitt-on-the-receiving-end-oregon-group-hits-epa.html?ana=e_ptl_bn&u=wkiE5IyNb4HDxutujUayRl7bhJ3&t=1487878175&j=77471591 

Boeing to produce high-tech airplane systems in Oregon http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/news/2017/02/23/boeing-to-produce-high-tech-airplane-systems-in.html?ana=e_ptl_bn&u=wkiE5IyNb4HDxutujUayRl7bhJ3&t=1487877470&j=77472031

Being Black in China http://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/destinations/asia/china/black-tourist-china/?utm_source=NGdotcom-Travel&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=20170223_Travel_Newsletter&utm_campaign=NGdotcom&utm_rd=641087671

The Digital Farm of the Very Near Future http://oregonprogress.oregonstate.edu/winter-2017/digital-farm-very-near-future


 

Sherman County eNews #54

CONTENT

  1. Happy Birthday, Sherman County, Feb. 25

  2. Sherman County Courthouse Groundbreaking and Open House, March 8

  3. 7th & 8th Grade Girls in Engineering and Marine Science (GEMS) Camp, March 10-11

  4. Town Hall: Stand up for Solar Energy, March 16

  5. Watch Your Language: A Euphemism

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


 1. Happy Birthday, Sherman County, Feb. 25

February 25th!

Happy Birthday, Sherman County!

clock.timeflies

IMAGINE! Imagine the history and the stories of our handsome historic county courthouse! Imagine the pride, anguish, trials, joy, excitement and frustration of the years…of public service, justice, weddings, mortgages, deeds, elections and county business transactions.

A BIT CURIOUS! It is a bit curious that, while Sherman County was carved from Wasco County in 1889, the courthouse was not built until ten years later. E. O. McCoy petitioned the legislature for formation of the new county in 1889, proposing to name it Fulton County for Col. James Fulton, a prominent pioneer legislator. In a political move because Col. Fulton opposed a visit to the state house by General William Tecumseh Sherman, the new county was named Sherman. Governor Sylvester Pennoyer signed the modified bill on February 25, 1889 and the new county was named for General Sherman.

OFFICIALS. The governor appointed officers to serve the county until the next general election: Col. James Fulton, county judge, [who declined, and Owen M. Scott was appointed]; John Medler and Dayton Elliott, commissioners; V.C. Brock, clerk; E.M. Leslie, sheriff; Levi Armsworthy, treasurer; C.C. Meyers, assessor; and C.J. Bright, school superintendent. On March 12, 1889, the newly-appointed officers and constituents met at the Oskaloosa Hotel in Wasco for the official swearing-in. Wasco was declared the temporary county seat. The new officials rented a rock and concrete building in Block 6 on Lot 7 in Wasco to be used by the sheriff and clerk. County and circuit court business was conducted in the school building.

EXPANSION. During the 1891 Oregon legislative session, a bill was introduced to expand the county 18 miles south, taking in Townships 3, 4 and 5 South. This new boundary followed Buck Hollow and an 11-mile east-west boundary across the south.

COUNTY SEAT. Selection of a county seat resumed in earnest. Three towns were selected for the ballot: Wasco, Moro and Kenneth [a hamlet once located near DeMoss Springs]. Strong emotions led up to the vote for Moro, influenced by the county’s southward expansion and new residents. In 1892 the county contracted for construction of a temporary building to house the clerk, sheriff and a vault. Records were moved to Moro. In 1893 a jail was added and the vault was rebuilt. A flag pole and flag were ordered in 1895. In 1896, a deputy clerk and deputy sheriff were hired.

1899. When the county began construction of the new courthouse on Block 23 in 1899, the temporary house on Block 23 in Moro was moved across the street to the south where it remains today. Charles Burggraf of Salem designed the handsome brick structure with Queen Anne architectural features, varied wall surfaces and a corner tower. It was built by contractor, A.F. Peterson of Corvallis, of thrifty material – brick manufactured in the brick yard behind it. The bell-shaped cupola was originally painted alternating bands of dark and light paint.

FOR THE RECORD. In a story written by Patricia [French] Moore and published in Sherman County: For The Record in 1983, it is noted that the Grass Valley Journal reported completion of the new courthouse on November 3rd. On the 10th the Journal editor observed that, “Everyone who has seen the new courthouse wonders how such a house could have been built with so little money [$6,665]. On November 22nd, 1899, Sherman County’s handsome, new courthouse was turned over to county officials.”

PROGRESS. In 1905, the Observer reported that there was a pot-bellied stove in each office and a complex of chimneys in the attic. Will Raymond was commissioned to produce ten large photographs of Sherman County scenes for the county’s exhibit at the Lewis and Clark Exposition in Portland and later for the courthouse walls, where they may be seen today. A jail and related supplies were purchased for $3,847 in 1905 and was located in the room the assessor now occupies. The assessor worked in the front room next to the clerk’s office.

CHANGE. Moore’s story continues. “Major changes took place in 1934 …the decision to dig a basement, construct walls, install a furnace and chimney for central heat and to put in a vault…work done as a relief project…under the leadership of county engineer, Hal White.” In 1941, the clerk’s vault was extended and the jail was moved to the rear of the courthouse. The brick on the south wall shows evidence of this move and brick replacement with matching windows. Upstairs remodeling accompanied construction over the jail, with chambers for the judge and jury. The handsome cupola was removed because of wind and storm damage by 1963 when Lee Gunnels painted the courthouse trim.

MORE CHANGE. Modern carpeting, tile ceilings, computers and glass doors joined delicate wooden ornamentation, filigree knobs and round-topped windows. The white picket fence is long gone; the jail is a museum artifact. New sidewalks and landscaping in 1999 marked the 100th anniversary of the county’s seat of government.


2. Sherman County Courthouse Groundbreaking and Open House, March 8

ShermanCoLogoThe public is invited to attend the official Sherman County Courthouse Addition and Renovation Groundbreaking Ceremony and Open House to be held Wednesday, March 8th at 1:30 pm at the Sherman County Courthouse in Moro. A brief groundbreaking ceremony will take place in front of the Courthouse to be followed by an open house in the Circuit Courtroom upstairs. Attendees will have an opportunity to meet with project team members to learn about the project scope and timeline, review floor plans, see examples of interior and exterior finishes, and enjoy refreshments.


3. 7th & 8th Grade Girls in Engineering and Marine Science (GEMS) Camp, March 10-11

child.girlRegistration is now open for a unique camp in Newport focusing on science, technology, engineering and math for 7th and 8th grade girls on the Oregon Coast.

The Girls in Engineering and Marine Science (GEMS) camp will run from March 10 to 11 at the Hatfield Marine Science Center, led by female faculty and graduate students from Oregon State University.

Participants will develop teamwork, communication and leadership skills and learn from mentors about what it is like to pursue a degree and career in engineering and marine-related fields. The girls will also engage in a variety of hands-on activities, get behind-the-scenes tours and spend the night in the shark tunnel at the Oregon Coast Aquarium, where they will learn about additional career opportunities.

The camp begins at 9 am on Friday, March 10, and ends at 4 pm Saturday, March 11. Meals are included both days. Parents and guardians should register participants at http://tinyurl.com/GEMSMar2017 no later than March 3.

The camp is made possible by a grant from Oregon State University’s Women’s Giving Circle and additional funding from the Oregon Coast STEM Hub. For more information on this and other programs, go to the Oregon Coast STEM Hub website at http://oregoncoaststem.oregonstate.edu or contact Tracy Crews at OregonCoastSTEM@oregonstate.edu.


4. Town Hall: Stand up for Solar Energy, March 16

sun.circleStand up for Solar Energy! Environment Oregon brings the discussion to Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, Thursday, March 16 from 6 to 8 pm. This town hall will discuss current solar efforts in the Columbia Gorge region and the importance of solar incentives for the growth of Oregon’s solar industry.  For more information, call 541-296-8600 x 201 or visit www.gorgediscovery.org.


5. Watch Your Language: A Euphemism

A euphemism is a word or phrase you choose when you think a certain word is too blunt or offensive to use. The word comes from two Greek roots: “eu” and “pheme.” “Eu” means good, as in eulogy (good words said about people, most often after they die) or euphoria (a good feeling). “Pheme” means speech, as in blaspheme (unfavorable words about something) or aphemia (loss of the ability to speak).

Let’s face it: Few things are worse than dying. So English speakers have come up with many euphemisms for death. Rather than say someone “died,” people say:

He passed away (or passed). She went to be with her Lord. He went home. She departed. He entered eternal rest. She was called home. He left this world. She succumbed. He lost his battle. She slipped away.

Those are pretty gentle ones. I’m not sure I understand the appeal of: Pushing up daisies. Giving up the ghost. Met the reaper.

Businesses have a treasure trove of words to avoid saying people are going to be fired:

We’re having a reduction in force. You’re being terminated (or let go). We’re downsizing, restructuring, streamlining, redeploying assets, right-sizing. Your position is being eliminated.

No one seems to know the origin of “pink slip” as a euphemism for firing someone. It doesn’t seem to have anything to do with lingerie, though. In Britain, a euphemism for getting fired is “being made redundant.” That doesn’t sound soothing at all.

In war, a killing may be called “neutralizing the target” or “collateral damage.”

When the economy is in bad shape, no one likes to say so. Some familiar terms used when the economy is tanking: slow economic growthdownturnpause in recoverya period of uncertaintydownward trend.

The truth may hurt, but using clear, accurate terms for things is the better way to go. Euphemisms blur meanings, and, in the long run, sometimes sound worse than the original terms.

By the way, a “dysphemism” is a word or phrase that you use to make something sound worse than it is. If, say, you don’t like the cuisine in your workplace cafeteria, you may call it “the cafe of terror.”

BEES AND THEIR KNEES: After I used “bee’s knees” in a column recently, a friend went in search of the origin of the phrase. The Oxford Dictionaries website says that the phrase was used as early as the 18th century to describe something tiny or insignificant. Then, in the 1920s, American slang picked up a lot of descriptions of tiny things to indicate that something was to be admired. “Bee’s knees” was one of these.

Others were “the cat’s whiskers” and “the canary’s tusks.” But my favorite was “the flea’s eyebrows.”

YESTERDAY. A reader wrote to mention a broadcaster’s use of the phrase “yesterday night.” We agreed that it would be better to say “last night.” But I couldn’t find any guidelines on this. Sometimes you just have to go with your gut.

WHO’S ON FIRST? And today, I found an interesting lesson on the use of “first” versus “firstly.” Use “first.” You can’t go wrong when you listen to E.B. White, who wrote on the matter in The Elements of Style: “Do not dress words up by adding ‘ly’ to them, as though putting a hat on a horse.” Horses probably hate that.

Sources: Oxford Dictionaries, Legacy.com, Snopes.com, Random House, University of Oregon, Christian Science Monitor, Merriam-Webster.

~ By Bernadette Kinlaw, February 20, 2017 http://m.arkansasonline.com/news/2017/feb/20/beating-all-around-the-proverbial-bush-/


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.talkHow did horses evolve? http://earthsky.org/earth/new-evolution-horse-challenges-model?mc_cid=3641cadb8c&mc_eid=6112eb3624

109-Year-Old Veteran and His Secrets to Life Will Make You Smile  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXyfCGDnuWs

Nearly 700 Miles of Fencing at the US-Mexico Border Already Exist  http://abcnews.go.com/US/700-miles-fencing-us-mexico-border-exist/story?id=45045054 

https://ballotpedia.org/Verbatim_fact_check:_How_many_miles_of_fence_stand_along_the_U.S.-Mexico_border%3F 

Nearby TRAPPIST-1 has 7 planets http://earthsky.org/space/big-discovery-7-earth-sized-planets-orbit-nearby-star?mc_cid=8caf73cf37&mc_eid=6112eb3624 

Aleppo Is In Ruins, But These Kids Are Heading Back To School http://www.forbes.com/sites/unicefusa/2017/02/07/aleppo-is-in-ruins-but-these-kids-are-heading-back-to-school/#2822668635af

Iraqi Suicide Bomber Ex-Gitmo Detainee http://www.militarytimes.com/articles/iraqi-suicide-bomber-was-ex-gitmo-detainee?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=EBB%202.23.17&utm_term=Editorial%20-%20Early%20Bird%20Brief

News. Lucianne.com http://www.lucianne.com/home/

News. Drudge.com  http://www.drudge.com/

Agencies would have 15 days to respond to records requests under AG’s bill http://www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/02/public_records_timeline_bill.html#incart_river_home

Oregon is the only state where a governor can’t be impeached. This lawmaker wants to change that. http://www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/02/oregon_is_the_only_state_where.html#incart_river_index

School officials push back on mandatory class size negotiations http://portlandtribune.com/pt/9-news/346663-226545-school-officials-push-back-on-mandatory-class-size-negotiations


 

Sherman County eNews #53

CONTENT

  1. Guest Editorial. Mac’s Musings: Chaos.

  2. Urban-Rural Gathering: Melting Mountains, Updated, March 4

  3. Sherman County Public/School Library Book Club Meeting, March 15

  4. Social Crafting, “Sticks in Stacks,” at Sherman County Public/School Library, Feb. 23

  5. Columbia Gorge Community College Workshop: Social Security Benefits, March 1

  6. You Are What You Think

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Guest Editorial. Mac’s Musings: Chaos.

pencil.sharpThat appears to be the circumstances in which Frontier Telenet now finds itself — without a business plan, without short or long range plans, without a strategic plan of day-to-day operations, without a clear picture of from where the entity has come or where it is going, without a budget, without knowledge of what costs lay ahead and the processes by which to obtain these costs, without an idea of from where revenues will come, without the benefit of economic analysis of the assets/infrastructure/operations costs or potential revenue sources and amounts, without effective management and without a consensus or clear focus on its purpose and future.

Add to that a stubbornness that won’t allow the administration or management to admit that circumstances are chaotic.

Frontier Telenet is an ORS 190 entity formed under the auspices of Gilliam, Wheeler and Sherman counties and the North Central Education Service District and administered by the three county judges with a manager in charge of operations. When formed some 15 years ago, it was an entity through which an innovative plan was facilitated to establish a 9-1-1 emergency call center at Condon to serve the emergency communications needs of the three counties via a wireless satellite system, a service that had previously been provided through Morrow County.

Late last year, the North Central ESD removed itself from the ORS 190.

The concept was brilliant and the practical application of that system has worked as planned, creating a reliable, local system of communicating for law enforcement and emergency medical services in the three counties and creating 11 well-paying jobs at the same time.

While the 9-1-1 call center has and continues to function brilliantly and without interruption, and has even added service to Jefferson County, the management of Frontier Telenet, which oversees the mechanical infrastructure of the 9-1-1 system, has become chaotic.

With the changing of the county judgeships in the three counties over the last 15 years, there has been very little continuity and background provided by the management, and/or planning for the future of the system.

Caught woefully off-guard by the sudden realization that the current wireless system had reached capacity and was in need of expensive upgrades to remain viable, Frontier Telenet was forced to spend thousands of dollars to upgrade the current system while also realizing that fiber optics would provide more capacity and more long-range stability to the system.

The realization came too little, too late.

Frontier Telenet now finds itself frantically trying to re-group, but without a clear mission and without a budget, and without knowledge of day-to-day expenses and costs, and without a plan and leadership, Frontier Telenet now appears to be in the way of fiber optics development in Gilliam County, when it could have been in the leadership role in the process to provide affordable high-speed broadband to 9-1-1, emergency medical services, law enforcement, schools, libraries, businesses and homes.

Frontier Telenet needs to take stock of its situation, define its assets and function, put in the necessary time and effort to establish a transparent business plan and a standard fiduciary system that will make it clear where the entity is headed and if that track is affordable, and good in the long range for the wireless system that has, here-to-fore, worked so well.  ~ With permission ofThe Times-Journal, February 23, 2017.


2. Urban-Rural Gathering: Melting Mountains, Updated, March 4

Sherman County was selected by a group from Seattle wanting to learn more about the differences between rural and urban areas. The primary mover was the recent elections where Seattleites voted 74% for Hillary Clinton while Sherman County voted 74% for Donald Trump.

We are looking for 12-15 Sherman County folks willing to meet with the urban group from Washington on Saturday, March 4 at the OSU Extension Office in Moro. The Seattle group will be treated to a short tour of the County then return to the Extension office where they will join Sherman County folks for a lunch and discussion to learn about the factors that lead to differences. Because of travel rules for their driver, they will need to leave about 3 p.m.

>>>> Persons wishing to contribute a few hours from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. are asked to contact the Extension Office (541-565-3230). Lunch will be provided for all and it will be interesting to see where and why the regions seem to differ.


3. Sherman County Public/School Library Book Club Meeting, March 15

books.loveSherman County Public/School Library Book Club will be meeting Wednesday, March 15 at 6:00pm. Please join us for tea, dessert, and discussion of our March book, “The Beach House” by Mary Alice Monroe. To request a hold call 541-565-3279 or email shermanlibrary@sherman.k12.or.us.


4. Social Crafting, “Sticks in Stacks,” at Sherman County Public/School Library, Feb. 23

Thread-and-needle“Sticks in Stacks” at Sherman County Public/School Library Thursday, February 23.
Social crafting starts at 6:00 p.m. every Thursday. Instructional assistance for knit, crochet, and spinning will be available at 7:00 p.m. Bring your knitting, crochet, spinning, quilting, or cross-stitch projects. All fiber arts are welcome.  For further information about this program please contact Sherman County Public/School Library at (541) 565-3279 or email shermanlibrary@sherman.k12.or.us.


5. Columbia Gorge Community College Workshop: Social Security Benefits, March 1

Columbia Gorge Community College offers a free workshop about social security benefits. The workshop provides a brief overview of the SSA, and includes an explanation of the agency, the coverage, and the benefits.

Two sessions are offered on Wednesday, March 1 CGCC Hood River campus from 9-11; and The Dalles campus from 1-3.  Preregistration is requested by calling the college at (541) 506-6011.


6. You Are What You Think

What do hopelessness, helplessness and stress have to do with rats, astronauts and you? 

Did you know that right after splashdown, one of the most difficult phases of spaceflight, NASA doctors found significant changes in the Apollo astronauts’ immune systems? The Apollo, Gemini and Mercury capsules (even the lunar excursion modules) were pretty cramped environments. Not much room to move, and “escape” required a significant amount of time, care and planning, especially for a spacewalk.

Researchers have also found that rats, given electric shocks from which they cannot escape, give up and become helpless. Later, when placed in a box where they can escape the shocks just by moving to the other side, these rats don’t even try. They also develop stomach ulcers and abnormal brain chemistry. And, it’s not because of the shocks. Another group of rats received the same amount of electricity, but they could turn the current off by pressing a bar. They remained healthy. 

There is no longer any question about it. Many, many studies have verified that the health of our immune systems is linked to our stress levels and our attitudes about life in general. Now a certain amount of stress is good for us and can give us more energy and greater concentration. But too much stress causes it to break down. We see the results of this stress in changes in productivity of the workforce, and the increase of sick days at all levels of our organizations.

Today, doctors recommend to their patients fighting cancer to put lot of time and energy into building up their immune systems. Monitoring their thoughts as carefully as controlling the diet has a great impact. If you’re concerned about living a long and healthy life, or if you’re fighting a serious illness, developing a sense of control about your life can be as important as anything else you do. Some say you are what you eat. But it looks more and more like you are also what you think and feel. ~ The Pacific Institute


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.eagleEastern Oregon for Bird Lovers http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/oregon-stories/eastern-oregon-for-bird-lovers/

The Dalles Eagle Watch  http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/grants-getaways/eagle-watch-in-the-dalles/ 

Tour the Dragon Man’s Home https://biggeekdad.com/2017/02/tour-the-dragon-mans-home/

Vietnam War History: Tet Offensive http://www.history.com/topics/vietnam-war/vietnam-war-history/videos/tet-offensive 

Wettest February of modern era: Portland breaks precipitation record http://www.oregonlive.com/weather/index.ssf/2017/02/portland_breaks_february_preci.html

Urban liberals must recognize needs of white working-class as well as immigrants, refugees (Opinion)  http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2017/02/urban_liberals_must_recognize.html#incart_2box_opinion

The Patriot Post https://patriotpost.us/digests/47610

Too many stinkbugs spoil the wine https://www.sciencenews.org/article/too-many-stinkbugs-spoil-wine


 

Sherman County eNews #52

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Photography Club, Feb. 27

  2. Sherman County Court Notes, Feb. 15

  3. Aging and Disability Resource Connection of Oregon

  4. Mud Springs Gospel Band to Perform at Kent Baptist Church, Feb. 26

  5. Oregon State Police’s new “CAR CARE PROGRAM”

  6. Imagination


1. Sherman County Photography Club, Feb. 27

camera. photographThe Sherman County Photography Club will meet on Monday, February 27,
7-9 p.m. at the Sherman County Public/School Library. Presenter, Jeremy Lanthorn, will show how to get the most out of editing your RAW file photos. If you got a new camera for Christmas or you are just tired of being stuck in the house this winter, come on out and join the fun. Guests and new members are always welcome.


2. Sherman County Court Notes, Feb. 15

ShermanCoLogo~ By Administrative Assistant Lauren Hernandez

(This is a brief summary of topics addressed and is not official minutes. For official minutes and details, please see the official approved minutes posted after the March 15 court session on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us.)

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on February 15, 2017, and in conducting the business of the county,

  • heard quarterly reports from Jenine McDermid, Clerk, and Nate Stice, Regional Solutions;
  • discussed Philippi Park emergency services with Sheriff Brad Lohrey; historically, Sherman County has provided emergency services for Gilliam County at the park during summer months on weekends; Sheriff Lohrey is not interested in entering into a contract with Gilliam County to provide services because if a major crime happens, resources will be taken away from Sherman County; the Sheriff’s Department will handle day-to-day problems and will assist Gilliam County deputies with getting to the park by boat, but Gilliam County should be responsible for any major crimes or events that take place;
  • heard from Amber DeGrange, Juvenile Director, seventeen students will take part in HAVEN’s Healthy Teen Relationship Summit; in the past, Prevention funds have been used to provide transportation to the event; Amber will see if the county’s bus will work for transportation, but if it does not, she will use Mid-Columbia Bus; the court approved using up to $500 of Prevention funds to provide transportation to the Healthy Teen Relationship Summit if necessary;
  • heard from Christa Rude, Four River’s Early Learning Hub (4RELH), fiscal activity for the hub will be reported to the court through a summary listing the agreements, the amounts, and where the money is allocated; the court would not like to manage the allocations but would like a simple overview of activity to stay informed; Christa asked for the authority to sign fiscal agreements as approved by the Governance Board; she will provide the court a summary of the agreement and how it is tied to the hub budget; an alternative to Christa signing agreements is having Amber DeGrange, 4RELH, or Debbie Hayden, Financial Director, sign them; there is no set monetary amount for agreements required for legal counsel to review; Will Carey, County Counsel, did review the original agreements and contracts; the court expressed it does not want to manage the 4RELH Board; if Christa is given authority to sign contracts, she will bring any contracts between Sherman County and the State of Oregon to the court for review; Amber stated there are many layers and safe guards when it comes to the hub agreements, and Christa pointed out the bylaws outline a specific written process the county can take if the court disagrees with any of the allocations or actions taken; Will suggested the court set a threshold for agreements to be reviewed over a certain amount; the court would like to hear complaints from other counties if the hub is not working properly but would not like to oversee or manage the hub, so a simple summary sheet is sufficient; the court supported the recommendation to give authority to Christa to, with the 4RELH Board’s approval, sign agreements on behalf of the hub for which Sherman serves as a backbone organization; Christa explained the contract Sherman County has with the state to be the backbone organization of the hub requires that all ‘first tier’ contracts between the county and any entity conducting work on behalf of the hub carry liability insurance; the state is in the process of developing a waiver system for this requirement; Christa recommended until the county is waived from this requirement, it contract with Columbia Gorge Education Service District (CGESD) to subcontract the necessary hub funds as directed to the smaller entities who are not able to meet the liability requirements; CGESD is a government entity and relieved of the requirement; Sherman County acting as the backbone entity is not exempt; the court approved Christa pursuing a subcontract with CGESD to distribute Preschool Infrastructure Grants and the Responsive and Innovative Funds;
  • opened a public hearing continuance regarding the Ordinance Repealing Ordinance No. 29-2005, Defining Procedure for Mass Gathering Permit Application, and Declaring an Emergency; County Counsel Will Carey reviewed changes to draft three, including removing the section about small gatherings and fixing typos; the amount of days required to submit an application prior to the event will be 90 days; the ordinance references the Sherman County noise ordinance, and Will will check to see if a noise ordinance exists; if not, one can be created; discussion was held about the Conditional Use Permit (CUP) process; applying for a CUP in addition to applying for the mass gathering permit will be necessary if the event is to be held during the fire season specified in the ordinance; the hours defining a gathering will match the Oregon Revised Statutes defining a mass/outdoor gathering as an event above 250 people that will reasonably continue for more than 120 hours in a three-month period; the county mass gathering threshold will remain 250 people; the mass gathering application will go through the County Court and all CUP applications will go through the Planning Department; discussion was held about amending the public safety section to require 1 security personnel for every 100 people; at the last public hearing, the sheriff requested 1 security personnel per every 50 people; Will will contact the sheriff about this before making a permanent change and will make changes to the draft and send it out before the next public hearing; a continuation of the hearing will be held at the next court meeting, and if no further feedback is received, the court may sign the ordinance;
  • heard an annual report from Kayla von Borstel, Sherman County Area Watershed Council Coordinator;
  • met with Jennifer Zimmerlee, RV Park Host, about upgrading the receptacles at the park; it is more user friendly to have 20/30/50 amp receptacles, but to upgrade them, the current receptacles will need to be removed from encased concrete and reinstalled; Jennifer suggested removing five of the 30 amp receptacles, replacing them with 50 amp receptacles, and purchasing five adaptors to have on hand for those with 30 amp RV’s; the court approved the proposal from Seven Peaks Electric in the amount of $650.20 to replace five 30 amp RV receptacles with five 50 amp receptacles, including breakers, wire, and receptacles; the old bathrooms need repair, as the sinks are loose, and the roof now has a hole in it, which may have caused damage to the structure; the court approved having the roof repaired at the restroom/laundry building at the RV Park with composition roofing and sub roof repair; future rates may be adjusted if upgrades like re-graveling the road and improving the Wi-Fi can be done; additional landscaping is needed;
  • met with Cindy Brown and David Skakel, Tri-County Hazardous Waste & Recycling Program, to discuss Sherman County’s hazardous waste collection; the collection is funded by surcharge through the landfill in Wasco County; the program has expanded into recycling education and outreach; each year, Sherman County benefits from the program, though much of the county’s waste goes to Arlington; Sherman County has always been assessed a fee equivalent to individual household waste in Wasco and Hood River counties to help pay for the program; in recent years, the volume of materials has gone up significantly; in 2011, the gap in Sherman County’s contribution to the program was $7,200, so the county has been paying this in addition to a one time annual payment to make the program whole; the 2016 collection event brought in enough Sherman County hazardous waste to cost $10,000, though the county contributes less than that to the program; David suggested holding two events per year to better serve the county; he also asked the court to consider increasing the amount the county contributes by approximately $5,000, making the total contribution approximately $12,000; this request will be discussed during Budget Committee;
  • heard from Rod Asher, Weed District Director, a letter will be sent out regarding a weed ordinance violation, and he would like the court’s full backing; at a recent Weed Board meeting, discussion took place including Rod and Will Carey, County Counsel, and direction was given to enforce state weed laws involving noxious weeds; the court stated Rod has the support of the court to send the letter after County Counsel reviews it; Rod reported he received a resignation letter from Paul Dornbirer, Cooperative Weed Management Area Deschutes River Project Coordinator;
  • heard from Brad Baird, Anderson Perry & Associates, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) funding application is ready to be signed and submitted; the USDA requires mandatory hook up clauses; the Conditional Use Permit for the reservoir site was submitted, and a hearing is scheduled for February 27 at 5:30pm; in the future, bids will go out for the well, and once the well is drilled and the yield is known, the rest of the project can be bid; a cultural resources evaluation may need to be done; site test pits need to be dug, and after the cultural evaluation, road earthwork can begin; depending on when funding arrives, the project can be bid and started; ideally, the well will be up and running by this time next year; Judge Thompson signed the USDA funding applications;
  • appointed Julia Hubbard and Dana Haner to the Sherman County Ambulance Board for a term of two years to expire December 31, 2018;
  • approved Amendment No. 1 to PSU Agreement #398573 between Portland State University and Sherman County to extend work on the South Sherman Fire & Rescue District income survey to June 30, 2017, to allow for the completion of scope and services;
  • authorized budget transfers/payments, including $60,500 to the County General Fund, $404,000 from the County General Fund, $16,000 from the Ambulance Fund, $8,745.52 from the Prevention Fund, $2,500 from Court Security, and $30,00 from the General Road Fund and authorized Judge Thompson to sign;
  • approved the grant submittal form for the Special Transportation/5310 Grant Application for Biennial Grant Period 2017-2019 and authorized Judge Thompson to sign;
  • authorized payment of the regular monthly bills from listed line items within the appropriate funds;
  • discussed Giles French Park, a Potlatch Food Service Inspection Report, a thank-you letter from Richard and Nancy Simpson, and Sherman County Website Updates;
  • heard reports from court members about regional board activities.

3. Aging and Disability Resource Connection of Oregon

grandparents.3When you are looking for information about services to address aging or disability needs, the Aging and Disability Resource Connection of Oregon can help you learn about public and privately paid options in your local community.  The ADRC has trained professional staff who can help you and your family with immediate needs, or help you plan for the future.

The ADRC of Oregon is a statewide resource for everyone, regardless of income level, and can be reached by a calling a toll free number, visiting a website or by contacting a local ADRC office.  The Mid-Columbia Council of Governments – Area Agency on Aging (AAA) now has an ADRC – Center for resources and multi-use.

A part time Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) participant will be joining our AAA in March to help us as a “Senior Outreach Specialist” or SOS.  We are very pleased to be a part of this Older American’s Act program as a host site.  I hope you will join me in welcoming Kitty Schmidt to our team.  www.ADRCofOregon.org 


4. Mud Springs Gospel Band to Perform at Kent Baptist Church, Feb. 26

music-notesThe Mud Springs Gospel Band will be performing at Kent Baptist Church this Sunday, Feb. 26 at 6 p.m. Everyone is welcome to attend for the concert and cookies afterward!


5. Oregon State Police’s new “CAR CARE PROGRAM”

car.blueIn an effort to improve public safety and assist the communities we serve, the Oregon State Police (OSP) is proud to announce a partnership with Advance Auto Parts/Carquest Auto Parts on our new “Car Care Program.”

OSP Troopers will be offering drivers stopped for a minor equipment violation a voucher that provides a discount on automotive parts purchased at any Advance Auto Parts or participating Carquest Auto Parts store.

According to OSP Superintendent Travis Hampton, “When an OSP Trooper stops a vehicle for an equipment violation, they understand some individuals defer maintenance on their automobile to pay for other necessities instead, such as groceries and rent. The Car Care Program allows us in a small way to assist individuals and families with improving the safety of their vehicle and our highways. Every OSP Trooper understands they can influence the trajectory of a person’s life, which is why ‘Compassion’ is a core value of our agency.”

“We’re pleased to partner with the Oregon State Police on the ‘Car Care Program,'” said Advance’s chief marketing officer, Walter Scott. “Advance is passionate about serving our customers and communities and our team members are always ready with the parts and advice that customers’ need to keep their vehicles running safely.”

Starting February 21, 2017, the Oregon State Police will start distributing these vouchers statewide. In 2016, the Oregon State Police issued over 20,000 warnings/citations for equipment violations. Seventy-seven percent of these violations were due to ORS 816.330 – Operating without Required Lighting. Required lighting includes all external vehicle lighting such as blinkers, headlights, and tail lights. These violations directly affect the safety of all vehicles on our roadways.


6. Imagination & Visualization

Are you using visualization to help ensure the results you want in the future? If you don’t, perhaps you could give it a try.

How good is your imagination? Now, when asked that question, most people invariably say that they have an active imagination. If that’s true for you, too, then you should certainly be using visualization techniques to help you get the results you want in the future.

Why? Well, because if you do it right, it works. How do we know this? Here at The Pacific Institute, in all of our offices around the world, we see evidence of it every day. Do some research of your own. Log on to your favorite search engine and see what you come up with regarding visualization. You’ll find more than enough to keep you busy for quite a while, and almost all of it will point to the same thing.

The imagination is a powerful tool that, when used properly, can enhance the results you get. High-performance athletes know more about this than most of us. In fact, you might want to start your research with the May 1985 Psychology Today and an article called “Visualization by Athletes.” Thirty-plus years later and the information still holds true, as we have found in our work with athletes around the world.

What you will find may amaze you. You see, one thing that separates human beings from other forms of life on this planet is the power of forethought. We can look forward and imagine, plan and goal-set, and “see” this imagined future just as real as where we are standing today.

Just remember that visualization isn’t solely for athletes. It is for anyone who wants to improve performance, in any endeavor. Since we are one month and a bit into the New Year, most resolutions have already been broken, re-started and broken again. Now might be the best time to get your imagination into training.

Visualization techniques are not difficult to learn. In fact, you already use them all the time. It’s simply a matter of bringing conscious control to the process. ~ The Pacific Institute