Sherman County eNews #10

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County School Athletic Schedule Update, Jan. 12

  2. Space Weather News for Jan. 12, 2017

  3. 5 ways to proofread your writing

  4. Grants Available for Main Street Building Projects

  5. Grants Available for Historic Cemetery Projects

  6. Grants Available for Historic Properties & Archaeology Projects

  7. Grants Available for Oregon Museum Projects

  8. Oregon Heritage Workshops and Grant Information

  9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County School Athletic Schedule Update, Jan. 12

sport.BXboy2High School Basketball

January 12, 2017 – Sherman vs Dufur at Dufur (GJV – no game, BJV at 4:30, GV at 6:00, BV at 7:30), bus departs at 2:30

Middle School Basketball

January 12, 2017 – Game vs. Condon is CANCELLED

~Audrey Rooney, Registrar, Sherman High School 541-565-3500


 2. Space Weather News for Jan. 12, 2017

sun.circlehttp://spaceweather.com
https://www.facebook.com/spaceweatherdotcom

SUNSPOTS VANISH: So far this year, the sun has been blank more than 90% of the time. Only one very tiny sunspot observed for a few hours on Jan. 3rd interrupted a string of spotless days from New Year’s through Jan. 11th. To find a similar sequence of blank suns, we have to go back to May of 2010, almost 7 years ago. What does this mean? Visit today’s edition of Spaceweather.com for the full story.

SPACE WEATHER CONTINUES: No sunspots? No problem. Observers around the Arctic Circle are still observing magnificent auroras. A new apparition is possible on Jan. 12th or 13th when a narrow stream of solar wind is expected to brush against Earth’s magnetic field. NOAA forecasters estimate a 35% chance of polar geomagnetic storms. Monitor the realtime aurora gallery for sightings.


3. 5 ways to proofread your writing

By Vicki Krueger • January 9, 2017

http://www.poynter.org/2017/5-ways-to-proofread-your-writing/444709/

Mistakes can lurk in your writing, whether it’s a story, article, blurb, e-book, caption, tweet, menu, flier, Facebook status, blog post, script, advertisement, graphic novel, comic, brochure, editorial, email, manifesto, letter, birthday card, bumper sticker, wedding invitation, classified ad or graffiti.

One cause of errors: You tend to read (or edit) with your memory rather than to actively read what’s on the screen. Your brain fills in the gaps in the writing and doesn’t notice typos, duplicated words or mistakes you’ve introduced while you were revising your work.

ONE. One solution: Trick your brain into thinking it is seeing something new. Here are some ways to help you slow down and look at the work with fresh eyes.

TWO. Read the material aloud–to yourself, your colleague, even your cat. Reading out loud forces you to say (and hear) each word. You’ll see whether you wrote “if” rather than “is” or “of.”  Or that you typed the word “and” twice in a row.

THREE. Check the first sentence. The beginning of a story gets a lot of attention. By the time you’re done, your brain knows what you meant to say, but your eyes may have skipped over what you actually wrote. Read it one more time.

And check the last paragraph. In a hurry to be done with your work and move on? Slow down and make sure you haven’t made mistakes in your haste to finish.

FOUR. Change your environment. Move to a different chair or room. Stuck at your desk? Change your posture.

FIVE. Change the type size, margins, fonts or colors. All of these send signals to your brain that this is something or different.


4. Grants Available for Main Street Building Projects

The State Historic Preservation Office is offering grants for up to $100,000 in matching funds for downtown revitalization efforts in communities participating in the Oregon Main Street Network. The Oregon Main Street Revitalization Grant funds may be used to acquire, rehabilitate, and construct buildings on properties in designated downtown areas statewide.

Funded projects must facilitate community revitalization that will lead to private investment, job creation or retention, establishing or expanding viable businesses, or creating a stronger tax base. Projects may include façade improvement, accessibility enhancement, basic utilities, second floor renovations and more. Only organizations participating in the Oregon Main Street Network are eligible to apply. Projects must be within approved Main Street areas. Eligible organizations may collaborate with the local governments and private property owners to apply for projects that will have the biggest benefit to the downtown.

“We are excited to see the impact this grant program will have in communities working hard to keep their downtowns a strong asset in their communities,” notes Sheri Stuart, Oregon Main Street Network Coordinator.

Preservation office staff is happy to talk with applicants about potential grant projects and review applications. A free workshop specific to the Oregon Main Street Revitalization Grant will be January 31 in Cottage Grove. Additional grant workshops on project planning and grant writing and using the online grant application will be offered. A two-hour workshop will be in Salem on March 15. A shorter webinar will be available on March 16. Two webinars, January 18 and 19, will explain the online grant system. To learn more about the grant, workshops, and the Oregon Main Street Network visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Sheri Stuart at Sheri.Stuart@oregon.gov or 503-986-0679.


5. Grants Available for Historic Cemetery Projects

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries is offering grants for qualified historic cemeteries. The annual grants fund projects that preserve historic cemeteries. Projects funded in the past include marker repair workshops, fencing, signs, interpretive panels and brochures, security lighting, access improvements, records management and more.

Awards typically range between $1,000 and $6,000, but have been higher. Anyone can apply for a grant. While the grant applications are online, they are simple and commission staff can provide support.

“Our goal is to preserve Oregon’s historic cemeteries, so we try to make it easy for people to access funds to do that while ensuring the funds are appropriately used,” said historic cemeteries program coordinator Kuri Gill.

A previous grant applicant, Patricia McCracken with Winchester Elementary School, said cemeteries program staff were supportive when she was submitting her grant report. “We were new to filling out grants; staff was extremely helpful when we called,” she said.

There will be free grant workshops on project planning and grant writing and using the online grant application. A two-hour workshop will be in Salem on March 15. A shorter webinar will be available on March 16. Two webinars, January 18 and 19, will explain the online grant system.

State law established the seven-member historic cemeteries commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. To learn more about the grants or visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


6. Grants Available for Historic Properties & Archaeology Projects

The State Historic Preservation Office is offering grants for work on historic properties and for archaeology projects. The annual grants fund up to $20,000 in matching funds for preservation projects.

The Preserving Oregon Grants fund preservation of historic buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Work may include non-maintenance preservation like window repair, roof work, foundation projects, and plumbing and electrical needs. It can also fund significant work contributing toward identifying, preserving and interpreting archaeological sites.

The Diamonds in the Rough Grants help restore or reconstruct the facades of buildings that have been heavily altered over the years. These grant return buildings to their historic appearance and potentially qualify them for historic register designation (local or national).

Preservation office staff is happy to talk with applicants about potential grant projects, review applications and assist with the online grant system. There will be free grant workshops on project planning and grant writing and using the online grant application. A two-hour workshop will be in Salem on March 15. A shorter webinar will be available on March 16. Two webinars, January 18 and 19, will explain online grant system. To learn more about the grants and workshops visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


7. Grants Available for Oregon Museum Projects

The Oregon Heritage Commission is offering grants to qualified museums for collections projects, heritage tourism, and education and interpretation projects. Awards typically range between $2,000 and $10,000.

Museums may apply for a variety of projects, including of the following examples. Collections projects may include cataloging, archival storage, disaster preparedness and conservation. Heritage tourism projects may include museum marketing and promotions, enhancing visitor experience, and training for museum staff. Education and interpretation projects may include exhibits, online education, school classes, workshops and camps. Museums may also partner with other organizations for projects that might be outside the museum, but still meet the museum’s mission.

“This program is a nice opportunity for museums to complete important projects,” said Oregon Heritage Commission coordinator Todd Mayberry.

While the grant applications are online, they are simple and there is plenty of support to complete them. “Our goal is to support organizations of all sizes all over the state in their valuable work. We provide assistance in the application process,” says Kuri Gill, the grants program coordinator. “A recent applicant and awardee noted she had never received more assistance, both before the with application and after with the award. That is the experience we hope to provide for all applicants.”

There will be free grant workshops on project planning and grant writing and using the online grant application. A two-hour workshop will be in Salem on March 15. A shorter webinar will be available on March 16. Two webinars, January 18 and 19, will explain online grant system.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon’s heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The commission’s mission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon’s heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

To learn more about museum grants, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


8. Oregon Heritage Workshops and Grant Information

Oregon Heritage staff is happy to help people think through possible projects, review applications, and assist with the online grant application system. A free workshop specific to the Oregon Main Street Revitalization Grant will be January 31 in Cottage Grove. Additional, grant workshops on project planning and grant writing will be offered. A two-hour workshop will be in Salem on March 15. A shorter webinar will be available on March 16. Two webinars, January 18 and 19, will explain the online grant system.

To learn more about these grant programs and others from the Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Humanities and Oregon Arts Commission attend one of the Meet the Funders events coming up in February.

February 2, 3:45-6:15              Astoria:  Liberty Theatre, McTavish Room

February 8, 3:45-6:15              Newport:  Newport Performing Arts Center

February 9, 3:45-6:15              Coos Bay: Coos History Museum

February 14, 3:45-6:15            Salem: Willamette Heritage Center

February 15, 3:45-6:15            Portland: Cerimon House

February 16, 3:45-6:15            Pendleton: Pendleton Center for the Arts

February 22, 2:30-5:00            Medford:  Jackson County Library, Adams Conference Room

February 23, 2:30-5:00            Eugene: Eugene Public Library, Bascom/Tykeson Room

February 28, 3:30-6:15            Sunriver:  Sunriver Area Public Library

Visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685 for more information.


9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeFact Check http://www.factcheck.org/

 London’s Big Ben Chiming Clock https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3c7hKe5Kp7TNWxMaWptZnNHcDQ/view

Gov. Kate Brown’s Inaugural Speech Pledges Pork for Rural Oregon—But No Plan on PERS http://www.wweek.com/news/2017/01/09/gov-kate-browns-inaugural-speech-pledges-pork-for-rural-oregon-but-no-plan-on-pers/

Bingham’s painting ‘Verdict of the People’ to take center stage at Trump’s inauguration  http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/binghams-verdict-people-take-center-stage-trumps-inauguration

Fire Fighting: Global Supertanker Finally Gets Approval: Interview with Jim Wheeler 010917  http://www.larslarson.com/listen-global-supertanker-finally-gets-approval-interview-jim-wheeler-010917/

Definition of demagogue. 1 : a leader who makes use of popular prejudices and false claims and promises in order to gain power. 2 : a leader championing the cause of the common people in ancient times. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/demagogue

Cold, stormy weather has a benefit: deep mountain snowpack http://pamplinmedia.com/pt/339541


 

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