Sherman County eNews #268

CONTENT

  1. Arthur (Art) Buether

  2. Sherman County Court Notes, Oct. 5

  3. Sherman County Court Special Session, Oct. 13

  4. Sherman County Court Draft Agenda, Oct. 19

  5. Program. Mayerdale Place, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oct. 21

  6. Hood River Valley Harvest Fest, Oct. 14, 15, 16

  7. Editorial. Going-Along-to-Get-Along


1. Arthur (Art) Buether

flower.rose.starArt passed on Sunday, October 9, 2016; he was 82. Come join us for a celebration of his life, Friday October 14, 2016; 2 PM graveside service at Grass Valley Cemetery; Gathering to immediately follow at Grass Valley Pavilion.

 


2. Sherman County Court Notes, Oct. 5

~ By Administrative Assistant Lauren Hernandez

ShermanCoLogo(A brief summary of topics addressed – not official minutes. For details, please see the official approved minutes posted after the October 19 Court session on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us)

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on October 5, 2016, and in conducting the business of the county,

  • heard from Amanda Hoey, Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Executive Director, the Sherman County Coordinated Transportation Plan has been updated for 2016-2019; the plan went through necessary procedure and addresses existing services and equipment as well as strategies to address needs and gaps in public transportation; the focus of the plan remains on high-priority funding and maintaining current services; the Court adopted the Sherman County Coordinated Transportation Plan 2016 Update as recommended by Mid-Columbia Economic Development District and authorized Judge Thompson to sign;
  • discussed workforce housing with Amanda Hoey and Jessica Metta, Mid-Columbia Economic Development District (MCEDD); the Court would like to focus on supporting the development of rental housing in the county; Jessica explained the construction loan program was based out of the county and is something that could be continued in the future; Jessica brainstormed a list of programs to encourage housing-for-rent, including grants (developer contribution assistance matches, project completion grants, and rent subsidy grants), donation of land, subsidized interest rates, low interest and/or deferred loans, low or zero-interest construction loans, construction loan guarantees, and forgivable loans; these programs would utilize the county’s housing dollars as well as MCEDD’s housing fund, and the process would include the MCEDD loan board; the Court discussed offering a menu of options from the list to prospective applicants; options for forgiving loans or buying down interest were discussed; offering a menu treats each applicant the same but gives them the ability to choose what is best according to individual needs; the Court agreed it is not comfortable making private loans to individuals and is agreeable to using MCEDD as a path to move forward; MCEDD will work on creating a formal program for applicants to utilize;
  • received quarterly reports from Shawn Payne, Emergency Services Director; Rod Asher Weed District Director; Amber DeGrange, Juvenile Director; Beth McCurdy, Fair Board Secretary; and Jenine McDermid, Clerk;
  • opened up a Supplemental Budget hearing; adopted a resolution making appropriations within the Weed Control Fund and Tri-County Veterans’ Fund in the amounts for the purposes presented in the Summary of Supplemental Budget for a total of $26,191;
  • received a Cottonwood Canyon State Park Annual Report from Tom Peterson, Cottonwood Canyon Park Manager; the first year open, the park saw 2,045 campsites sold; this year, 3,115 campsites were sold; fall and spring see the most visitors; the annual emergency services meeting was held with law enforcement and emergency services to tabulate emergency calls in the park; last year there weren’t many, though since May there have been several fires; work is in progress to place a telecommunications tower in the park; placement of the tower was discussed; Aaron Lafky, property owner, stated the tower should reach the entire park, not just headquarters, and asked that this be considered as the project moves forward; the tower will signal as far as possible, and discussion was held about ways to extend the signal’s reach; the tower will allow for emergency service communications; Tom reported the Environmental Assessment and Cooperative Management Agreement are still underway; the gate at the end of Starvation Lane is currently closed to prevent vehicles from driving through the dry river bed to the island; the gate will remain closed until water levels are higher; Judge Thompson asked Tom for a traffic count on Starvation Lane to assist with the Federal Lands Access Program Grant; Aaron stated he was present to testify that Cottonwood State Park continues to operate outside of the Conditional Use Permit (CUP) and the county needs to enforce land use codes and the CUP, or the state needs to amend the master plan; he stated the condition of Starvation Lane continues to be an issue and that no emergency system is in place at the park;
  • approved the appointment of Jeanne Kuettel and Justin Miller from the Non-Office Holding Pool and Gary Thompson with Mike Smith as alternate from the Office Holding Pool to the 2016-2017 Board of Property Tax Appeals;
  • approved the Blanket Purchase Agreement for Medicaid Transportation Provider Service between Mid-Columbia Council of Governments and Sherman County pending approval by County Counsel;
  • denied the Resident Incentive Program appeal from Doris Alley due to Ms. Alley’s moving out of the county before payment is sent, making her ineligible to receive a check;
  • re-appointed Larry Hoctor to the Library Board for a four-year term to expire July 1, 2020, as recommended by the Sherman County Public/School Library Board;
  • approved sponsorship renewal of Gorge Technology Alliance at the Silicon level in the amount of $500 for the period October 1, 2016, through September 30, 2017;
  • approved an estimate from FLI Landscape in the amount of $1,165 to provide general fall clean-up maintenance and irrigation winterization to the courthouse and in the amount of $80 to provide irrigation winterization at the Senior Center for a total of $1,245;
  • approved the Agreement for Survey Services contract between Portland State University and Sherman County on behalf of South Sherman Fire and Rescue District to conduct an income survey that can be used to apply for U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Development Block Grant funding and authorized Judge Thompson to sign pending approval of County Counsel;
  • discussed a letter to the City of Moro and a fiber update;
  • heard reports from Court members about regional board activities.

3. Sherman County Court Special Session, Oct. 13

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court will hold a special session on Thursday, October 13, 2016, at 8:30 a.m. in the Circuit Court Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039. The purpose of the special session is to discuss Frontier TeleNet, Frontier TeleNet employee contracts, and the Court’s response regarding recent press about Frontier TeleNet.


4. Sherman County Court Draft Agenda, Oct. 19

The Sherman County Court will meet on Wednesday, October 19, 2016, at 9:00 a.m.

countycourtagenda-october-19-2016_page_1

countycourt2agenda-october-19-2016_page_2


5. Program. Mayerdale Place, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oct. 21

Those of us who are familiar with the Historic Columbia River Highway have always been intrigued with the stately Mayerdale Mansion and Estate, located on Hwy 30 between Mosier and Rowena. Now we have an opportunity to learn the history of the Mayerdale estate. This is a program for the Historic Columbia River Highway’s centennial celebration, and is funded in part by a grant from Oregon Heritage Commission.

Join Tom Garnier for a program on Mayerdale Place, Friday, October 21, with dinner at 6 p.m., followed by the program at 7 p.m. at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles, Oregon. The cost for the chicken stuffed with goat cheese dinner and program is $18, the program only is $5. Make your dinner reservations by October 19 by calling 541-296-8600 ext. 201.


6. Hood River Valley Harvest Fest, Oct. 14, 15, 16

 Hood River Valley Harvest Fest Celebrates the Region’s Incredible Autumn Bounty

Times: Friday 1 – 6pm • Saturday 10am – 6pm • Sunday 10am – 5pm
Where: Hood River Event Site, Hood River Oregon
Tickets: $6 – Adults •  $5 – Seniors (65+)  •  Kids (12 and under) – FREE
More Info: http://hoodriver.org/harvest-fest/


7. Editorial. Going-Along-to-Get-Along

pencil.spiralGoing-along-to-get-along, going with social pressure for something as simple as saying you love an idea because your friends do or joining an organization in order to gain acceptance, creates good feelings about being part of a group.

These positive feelings are important for our collective community efforts – projects for the public good. Decisions are made for these projects by those who show up, go along and get along. Restoration of the Grass Valley Pavilion, cemetery clean-up days, the Memorial Day parade, the county fair, the museum, athletic foundation, ABC Huskies Day Care, and supporting and volunteering for local organizations, come to mind.

In our experience, going along often turns out to be the beginning of growing into something bigger than ourselves. For example, most of us have been invited to help at an event – “It will only take a couple of hours,” and we found new friends and interests.

We heard a smiling Mrs. Rural Kent say to Mrs. Urban Rufus, “If we weren’t volunteering here we wouldn’t have met and had so much fun!” It started with showing up.

We remember our friend Joe, a team player with cheerful wisdom, enthusiasm and common sense. He showed up, rolled up his sleeves and went to work. As it was with Joe, going along may offer interesting challenges and important responsibilities. Getting along took him to consensus-driven exhibit production at our local museum. He took the lead for sections of the Oregon Trail and Cultivation, Conservation and Clothespins exhibits. Growing along to something larger, he was proud to be in Omaha to accept a national award for our museum!

On the other hand, the same process holds true for going-along-to-get-along with negative social pressure. We can expect this to reduce community participation and support, or to create an attitude of mutual non-cooperation. To justify a negative response, we might think: “No one will care.” “I won’t be missed.” “It takes too much time.” “I don’t know enough.” “I don’t like so-and-so.” “I might get my feelings hurt.” So, we don’t engage.

But, people do notice and they do care, and they understand the significance of our collective personal and community loss. We’re few in number, and we’re all in this place called Sherman County together. There is a lot at stake.

Jesse Ventura offered another point of view: “I believe to go along to get along is unpatriotic. I believe that agreeing with your government on everything they do is unpatriotic. I believe a patriot stands up and holds our government’s feet to the fire, because if you do that, you will get good government.”


 

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