Sherman County eNews #260

CONTENT

  1. Social Crafting, “Sticks in Stacks,” at the Library, Oct. 6

  2. Sherman Football Update, Oct. 7

  3. Condon/Wheeler Volleyball Tournament, Oct. 8

  4. Maryhill Museum, Historic Roads & Sam Hill: Drive the Maryhill Loops Road, Oct 9

  5. Sherman County Preschool Announces the Gala of Trees

  6. 10th Annual Wasco Salmon/Steelhead Tournament Winners

  7. Library Book Club Meeting, Oct. 19

  8. Congressman Walden: Protecting Patient Access to Emergency Medications Act

  9. Having It Both Ways


1. Social Crafting, “Sticks in Stacks,” at the Library, Oct. 6

Thread-and-needle“Sticks in Stacks” at Sherman County Public/School Library Thursday, October 6. Social crafting starts at 6:00 p.m. every Thursday. Instructional assistance for knit, crochet, and spinning will be available at 7:00 p.m. Bring your knitting, crochet, spinning, quilting, or cross-stitch projects. All fiber arts are welcome. For further information about this program please contact Sherman County Public/School Library at (541) 565-3279 or email shermanlibrary@sherman.k12.or.us.


2. Sherman Football Update, Oct. 7

sports-football2This Friday’s game, October 7th, will be in Fossil, vs. Mitchell/Spray at 1 p.m. Departure times have been changed.

 

 


3. Condon/Wheeler Volleyball Tournament, Oct. 8

sports-volley-ball

Saturday, October 8th at 9 a.m. 

Condon/Wheeler

Mitchell Spray

Sherman

Dufur

Ione

Weston McEwen


4. Maryhill Museum, Historic Roads & Sam Hill: Drive the Maryhill Loops Road, Oct 9

On the Road in Washington: Historic Roads and Sam Hil
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9 | all day

Explore Sam Hill’s remarkable role the development of roads in the Northwest, Oregon and Washington in particular, as well as a general look at the history of roads, highways, and bridges of the region.
Supported by a grant from Humanities Washington. 

car_redMORNING:
Drive the Historic Maryhill Loops Road | 10 a.m. to noon
Take a spin past the beautiful scenery and through the road’s eight hairpin curves. Free on the historic Maryhill Loops Road, located east of US 97 off State Route 14.

View Sam Hill and the Columbia River Highway at Maryhill, or visit the Twin Bridges Museum in Lyle, WA to see the exhibition Lyle Convict Road. Watch the film “Paradise Road” at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, The Dalles, OR.

AFTERNOON:
Seminiar: On the Road in Washington | 1 to 4 p.m.
Speakers are Robert Hadlow, Senior Historian for the Oregon Department of Transportation, who will speak on the Historic Maryhill Loops Road; Craig E. Holstine, Historian, Washington Department of Transportation, will speak on historic highways in Washington; and Charles Luttrell, Archeologist, Washington State Parks, will speak on convict labor roads in Washington. Colleen Schafroth, Executive Director, Maryhill Museum of Art, will moderate.

Reception | 4 to 5 p.m.
Stay to discuss historic roads afterwards with our experts, and enjoy hors d’oeuvres and a special pouring of Maryhill Winery’s Special Commemorative Label celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Historic Columbia River Highway and Sam Hill.


5. Sherman County Preschool Announces the Gala of Trees

Sherman County Preschool is excited to announce that we will be offering the Gala of Trees fundraiser this year- beautifully decorated trees and wreaths for a good cause! There will be more details to come, please mark us on your calendar for the upcoming holiday season. We are also accepting sponsors for this event, please contact Sherman County Preschool at 541-565-3320 if you’d like to make a tax-deductible donation. Thank you!


6. 10th Annual Wasco Salmon/Steelhead Tournament Winners

fish2Saturday, Sept 24th was a perfect day, sunny and no wind, for the 10th Annual Wasco Salmon/Steelhead tournament!

Jim Richardson of Parker Dam, California, won a with a 20.41 #chinook. He was the over-all winner of Andy Nichols’ beautiful hand-blown glass fish, and as the men’s 1st place winner, a Lamiglas rod and Okuma reel.

Karen Farris of Eagle Creek, Oregon, won the 1st place women’s division with a 12.69# chinook. She also won a Lamiglas rod and Okuma reel.

Tiny tale was won by Jerry Taylor of Sisters, Oregon, won a Cabela cap for a 3.39# jack salmon.

Forty-nine registered fishing participants came from Oregon, California, Washington and Idaho. Volunteers and participants at the weigh-in at Wasco’s historic RR depot enjoyed some fun, good food, a large silent auction, and the winners’ “goodies” in the popular “I, also, fished but didn’t win anything” category. Five dedicated volunteers pulled this off without a hitch!!

Generous and appreciated sponsors were Bank of Eastern Oregon, PGE, Camp Plumbing David and Laura Re, Wasco Market, City of Wasco, Lean To Cafe, Wasco House Bed and Breakfast, DeGrange Construction, LLC, Morrow County Grain Growers. Merchandise was donated by Amato Publishing, Bi-mart, Catcher Company/Smelly Jelly, Coastal Farm and Ranch Supply, Crimson Trace, Inc. and Cabela’s. A special thank you to Andy Nichols, owner of Nichols Art Glass in The Dalles for once again providing the grand prize, one of his beautiful hand-blown glass fish.

~ Carol MacKenzie, Coordinator 541-442-5079 wlmack@yahoo.com 


7. Library Book Club Meeting, Oct. 19

books.loveThe Sherman County Public/School Library Book Club will meet on Wednesday, October 19 at 6:00pm. Join us for tea, dessert, and a discussion of our October book, George Washington’s Secret Six by Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger. For more information: 541-565-3279 or e-mail mmartin@sherman.k12.or.us.

 


8. Congressman Walden: Protecting Patient Access to Emergency Medications Act

American flag2Imagine this scenario: You’re involved in a car wreck on a remote secondary road in rural Oregon.  It’s so remote, there’s no cell phone service.  Even two way radios can’t get a signal out.  When emergency responders arrive, they can’t administer anti-seizure or heavy duty pain drugs because they can’t communicate either.

That’s what could happen as a result of an Obama Justice Department ruling that said “standing orders” from physicians, which grant emergency responders the ability to care for you, are not adequate under the law.

Emergency medical providers do excellent work caring for patients all across our vast district. Unnecessary government red tape shouldn’t get in their way. That’s why I’m pleased to let you know that the U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee, of which I am a member, has unanimously approved H.R. 4365, the Protecting Patient Access to Emergency Medications Act. This bill will help ensure that our first responders can continue administering life-saving medicines to patients when they need them most.

Emergency medical services practitioners often have to administer and deliver controlled substances like pain narcotics and anti-seizure medications under directional guidelines written by physicians known as “standing orders.” Yet, the Justice Department recently determined that this current practice may not be allowed under existing law, threatening the very existence of this life-saving practice.

The Protecting Patient Access to Emergency Medications Act will allow emergency medical responders to continue to administer controlled substances under the supervision of a physician through the current practice of standing orders. It ensures that life-saving medications are given to patients faster in emergency situations when seconds and minutes matter.  I believe this bill is especially important for emergency medical responders in rural Oregon, where patients often live far away from the nearest hospital and doctor, and where contact by phone or radio doesn’t work.

This bill has strong support from the American Ambulance Association and the National Association of EMS Physicians.  I will be sure to keep you updated as it progresses to the House floor. It is an honor to represent you in the U.S. Congress.

Greg Walden
U.S. Representative
Oregon’s Second District


9. Having It Both Ways

Today, let’s look at the art of accepting things from others. Everyone knows that it feels great to give, and most of us have learned that it’s better to give than to receive. But there is a blessing to being able to receive gracefully too, and that is what we want to look at today.

How does it feel to give a gift that is virtually ignored or, worse, received badly? Pretty awful, right? Children, especially, labor long and with great love to make special presents for their families. It can be crushing to see their best handiwork ignored or passed off with a comment like, “What’s this supposed to be?”

This becomes a memory that lasts forever, one that can be re-remembered again and again. And neuroscientists today tell us that each time we bring up a memory, there is a good chance we change it, amplify it, so the next time we remember it, those feelings of hurt are even stronger.

Some folks have trouble telling the white lies that sometimes seem necessary, in order to spare another’s feelings. However, it’s never necessary to lie. You don’t have to say, “This is just what I’ve always wanted,” if it’s not true. But you can usually find something to compliment and you can certainly acknowledge, with pleasure, the thoughtfulness and effort the giver has shown without worrying about stretching the truth.

You see, when you receive a gift graciously and with genuine gratitude, you are also giving something very precious at the same time you receive. As the saying goes, “It is a blessing to give and to receive.” And, it is one of those rare occasions when you can have it both ways. ~ The Pacific Institute


 

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