Sherman County eNews #257

CONTENT

  1. I-84 ramp closures in/near The Dalles

  2. Sherman Junior High Athletic Schedule Update

  3. Genealogy Jamboree Celebrating National Family History Month, Oct. 8

  4. Kegan Forrester, Sherman High to Linn-Benton Welding Graduate

  5. Inis Irene Helms Jones 1931-2016

  6. Elaine Kelley Kalista, Mass of Christian Burial, Oct. 8

  7. Floating All Boats


 1. I-84 ramp closures in/near The Dalles 

sign_slowPlease alert motorists to the following I-84 ramp closures, as paving takes place on the Freeway:

All work 7pm – 7am each day.

  • 10/1 Exit 76 EB on/off ramp
  • 10/2 Exit 82 EB off ramp
  • 10/3 Exit 82 EB on ramp, Exit 83 EB off/on Ramp, Exit 84 WB off Ramp
  • 10/4 Exit 83 WB on ramp, Exit 82 WB off/on Ramp

These closures are subject to weather or other construction delays. Message boards are in place on the freeway and ramp closures will be lifted once the freeway paving has passed them. ~ Oregon Department of Transportation


 2. Sherman Junior High Athletic Schedule Update

shermanathleticupdate9-30


3. Genealogy Jamboree Celebrating National Family History Month, Oct. 8

Please join us to celebrate National Family History Month on Saturday, October 8, 2016, at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center. This is a open forum style event for all levels of genealogical research from beginner to advanced. Or if you haven’t done genealogy before , we will help you get started. We will have Jan Bony from Oregon GenWeb and Emma Jean Smith from The Daughters of the American Revolution to answer any questions and to guide you in your research. Also our CGGS members will be glad to help you start your journey to the past and bring your ancestors  to life. The jamboree also will be covering subjects like organizing your genealogy, DNA, internet resources, genealogy software, military research, social media, and we will have someone to help you with your technology device (laptop, phone, etc. ).

We will be giving out great door prizes too. Attendees will have a chance to win a new HP Envy 4520 3- in -1 Wireless Printer, a genealogy gift basket with assorted research tools plus a 32 GB Lexar flash drive , the new book by Drew Smith “Organizing your Genealogy” and we will be giving away 2 free one year memberships to the Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society. This event is free and we encourage you to bring a friend.
The Jamboree starts a 10:00 and closes at 2:30.


4. Kegan Forrester, Sherman High to Linn-Benton Welding Graduate

graduation2Linn-Benton Community College publishes student stories, and this one features a Sherman High School graduate. http://www.linnbenton.edu/current-students/student-support/instructional-departments/welding-technology/student-stories/kegan

After dropping out of college, Kegan Forrester finds the courage to try again – then graduates from the welding program with honors, and lands a good paying job in the aerospace manufacturing industry!

“Everyone at LBCC encouraged me to keep going. The faculty is inspiring and really wants to help their students succeed. They aren’t just here to collect a paycheck.” Kegan Forrester

You would think honor roll student Kegan Forrester’s road to college would be nothing but smooth.

Though he ended up graduating from the welding program with honors, Kegan’s first try at college was not so great.

After struggling in math, he decided to drop out – with no intent of returning. Maybe college just wasn’t for him. Being the first in his family to attend college, Kegan really felt he was on his own to figure things out.

He discovered along the way that sometimes it takes trying, failing, and then trying again to succeed.

After high school, Kegan, like many students, went to work. Although he liked his job at a farm outside of his hometown of Moro, Oregon, he knew that getting a college education would help him be more successful in life.

“My first try at college, I actually started out pursuing a criminal justice degree – I didn’t start thinking I would become a welder,” said Kegan. Although he was doing well in most classes, college-level math was challenging – so much so that Kegan became discouraged and dropped out.

He returned to his farm job near Moro, something he knew he could do. But his bosses saw his potential, and with their encouragement, Kegan decided to give college a second try; only this time in a different program. Since he liked welding in high school, he reasoned, the welding program seemed like a good second choice.

As it turns out, he found that he could do the math. LBCC industrial programs offer math and writing classes that directly relate to each program, and Kegan actually got the math this time.

“Welding has its own core classes, including both math and writing for welders, which helped me to connect and understand it better,” said Kegan. “I love welding. It’s a great fit for me at this point in my life.”

And, connecting with people who could help along the way was key to his success. “There were a lot of people who helped me, including math instructor Russ Burchard who often worked with me one-on-one,” said Kegan. “My welding instructors, Fred Stuewe, Dean Dowless and Dave Ketler were great as well, and helped keep me on track with my schedule.”

As a bonus, a few months before finishing the program, Kegan landed a good paying welding job at a local aerospace manufacturing company.

“My advice for new students is to get to know as many people at the college as possible. They can help you along the way,” says Kegan. “Getting involved and meeting people helped me to get grants to help pay for school, and helped me get a job. I’ve made some excellent friends here.”

Kegan served as budget officer for LBCC Student Leadership Council, as president of the LBCC Welding Club, and as senior vice president of LBCC Phi Theata Kappa (PTK) Honor Society. He also volunteered at Christmas Storybook Land and participated in two Honors In Action Projects.

During his last college term, Kegan was taking 28 credits and working full time. He graduated with honors, earning an associate of applied science degree in welding. He’s the first in his family to earn a college degree.

~ Story & photo: Lori Fluge-Brunker, LBCC College Advancement Marketing Office
Calapooia Center  www.linnbenton.edu/programs


5. Inis Irene Helms Jones 1931-2016

flower.rose.starInis Irene Helms Jones passed away September 22, 2016 in The Dalles. She was born in Mitchell, Oregon, on May 20, 1931. She lived in Sherman County since 1963, first in Wasco, later in Biggs Junction and most recently in Moro.

She is preceded in death by her parents, Vincent “Mike” Helms and Stella Nicholas Helms; her younger sister, Mary Jane Helms Smith (Paul), her youngest son Willam C. Jones Jr., and her three husbands: LeRoy D. Smith, Michael Kravitch, and William C. Jones, Sr.  She is survived by her brother, Merle Helms (Phyllis); two sons Michael J. Smith (Cindy) of Grand Marais, Minnesota, and Tony R. Jones (Ana Fe) of White Salmon, Washington; three grandchildren: Tyler Jones (Alexandra), Erin Jones (Logan), and Alex Smith.

Inis was the bookkeeper for her husband, Bill Jones’ service station and garage and rock shop in Moro, and worked as a waitress and short-order cook. She enjoyed long drives in Sherman, Gilliam, Wasco and Wheeler counties, and considered Mitchell her home and favorite place. She was laid to rest in Wasco Sunrise Cemetery next to her son Billy Jones.


6. Elaine Kelley Kalista, Mass of Christian Burial, Oct. 8

flower.rose.starMass of Christian Burial

St. Mary Catholic Church, Wasco, Oregon

October 8th at 11 a.m.


7. Floating All Boats

A growth mindset, which has always been important psychologically, is a critical factor in economic well-being, too.

For five decades, The Pacific Institute has been working with the most forward-thinking business and world leaders to teach them the importance of a workforce with an efficacious, growth mindset. The concepts taught by Lou Tice have worked their way into mainstream American business culture. A book called “The Power of Self-Esteem,” by psychologist Nathaniel Branden pointed out that a workforce lacking confidence in its ability to think and cope with life’s challenges won’t be very productive or competitive in a demanding global environment.

Branden reminded supervisors and managers to help employees stretch by supporting training and workshops, and to tolerate mistakes as long as people learn from them. He also counseled listening to employees because they have something worthwhile to say and asking for their help as ways to stimulate new ideas. In doing this, you are building confidence by giving lots of sincere compliments and encouragement

What occurs, when this happens, is you are creating a workforce with a “growth” mindset, instead of a “fixed” mindset that fears change. Each individual, within the full spectrum of employees, is seeing each situation as an opportunity for growth. Change is sought, not feared. Personal development is vital, and not an afterthought. Personal development training for managers as well as for those they manage becomes a critical investment.

In the final analysis, it is difficult to have a workforce that is any more confident than the individuals who comprise it. Remember, it’s not the machine that shows up for work every day – it is a human being. Let’s give each worker, regardless of job responsibilities, every opportunity to know they are integral components in the organization’s success. As the old saying goes, “A rising tide floats all boats.” ~ The Pacific Institute


 

Advertisements

Sherman County eNews #256

CONTENT

  1. Classifieds

  2. Calendar


 1. Classifieds (new or corrected)

people.womanNOTE. Please submit classified ads by using the Submit News page. Sherman County eNews publishes free Classifieds on Fridays, deadline Wednesday at 5. Include who, what, where, when, how, why… and, the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad), contact information, under 50 words if possible, and limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Friday Classifieds are a great place for thank you, commendation and congratulatory notes.


thankYouTHANK YOU NOTES, COMMENDATIONS & CONGRATULATIONS:

THANK YOU! The Wasco School Centennial Celebration Committee would like to thank all the volunteers who helped put on a very successful party for our school. There were over 50+ people who helped in one way or another with this project. Also, a huge thank you to the Sherman County Cultural Coalition for approving the grant to fund this project. ~ Linda Krafsic for the Wasco School Centennial Celebration Committee

A Great Big Thank You To Everyone! The Sherman County Fair Board: Bert, Bryce, Jennifer, Ricky, Shandie, Ted, Tom and Beth, would like to thank the participants, volunteers and guests who attended and helped to make the 2016 Country Pride, County Wide Fair a success!  We could not do it without the community coming together to make the fair a realization!  We would like to remind you we still have available our panel donations.  These panels are for our new warm up arena for the horses and can be used in different configurations to help make our events run smoothly.  These panels are $130.00 and will have name plates attached designating the donor or you may turn them into a tribute or a memorial.  Please send checks to Sherman County Fair at P.O. Box 45, Wasco, OR 97065 along with the name you would like on the panel. If you have any questions, please call Bryce at 541- 980- 1539. Thank you and we look forward to seeing you next year! ~~ Jennifer Zimmerlee, Fair Board member

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

EMPLOYMENT:

COMMUNITY REPRESENTATIVE, STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAM. Non-Profit Organization Looking for Community Area Representatives to Join our International Team. ASSE International Student Exchange Programs is seeking individuals to serve as Area Representatives in your local community.  ASSE provides academic year and semester exchange programs in the United States for high school students from around the world.  Students are 15 to 18 years of age, have passed a series of academic and character requirements and are awaiting an opportunity to embark on their American Adventure. Area Representatives recruit and screen prospective host families, interview students to study abroad and supervise the exchange students in their community.  Area representatives are compensated based on the number of students they are supervising. There is also a great bonus opportunity. ASSE’s primary goal is to contribute to International understanding by enabling students to learn about other languages and cultures through active participation in family, school and community life. ASSE’s Area Representatives are the cornerstone of the organization, making all of this possible! For more information about ASSE or becoming an Area Representative, please call our Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or email us at asseusawest@asse.com. We look forward to welcoming you to the ranks of Area Representatives nationwide – striving towards a world of understanding, one child at a time!   12/30

SOCIAL SERVICE SPECIALIST I. Child Welfare District 9 currently has a vacancy for a Social Service Specialist I (Child Protective Services Worker) in our Condon office, which primarily serves Gilliam, Sherman, and Wheeler Counties. The district also serves Hood River and Wasco Counties. Condon is a proud, century-old farming community nestled between miles of rolling, golden wheat fields in Eastern Oregon. Condon is located on the high plateau of the Columbia River Region — just 38 miles south of the mighty Columbia River, less than 3 hours east of Portland, 2 hours west of Pendleton, and 2.5 hours north of Bend. Condon is at the doorstep of the Blue Mountains and the new Cottonwood Canyon State Park, which provide outstanding hiking, camping, boating and fishing opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts. Condon offers breathtaking views of the magnificent Cascade Range and a simple, what’s-your-hurry lifestyle. Not to mention fresh air, open skies, and friendly neighbors too. The region boasts approximately 300 days of sunshine a year and experiences four distinct, enjoyable seasons. There are fantastic recreational and cultural opportunities…it is a wonderland for cyclists, hikers, river rafters, boaters and water sports, campers, anglers, skiers, art lovers and history buffs – just to name a few.Please use the link below to apply. The posting closes at 11:59 pm October 5, 2016:

https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/oregon/jobs/1540687/social-service-specialist-1-child-protective-service-worker If you have any questions or would like to learn more about this opportunity, please contact the supervisor, Jim Posey, at (541) 340-0434.  9/30

GRAIN WAREHOUSEMAN. Mid Columbia Producers (MCP) is seeking applicants to join our team as a Grain Warehouseman. This full time position will be based in Sherman or Gilliam County, negotiable upon hire. The role of Grain Warehousemen is to safely handle grain while rendering outstanding customer service to our patrons. As an MCP employee you will have the opportunity to perform a wide variety of jobs within the department. Including but not limited to grain elevator operation, maintenance and housekeeping, barge loading, operation of tractor-trailers, inventory management and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility.

Preferred:

 Mechanical inclination, to be able to troubleshoot work on minor repairs

 Industry knowledge

Required:

 Ability to work well under pressure and deal tactfully with others

 Able to conform to shifting priorities, responsibilities, strategies, demands and timelines

 Strong personal and customer service skills. Good verbal and written communication skills

 Must be able to climb ladders and work at heights up to 200 ft.

 Periodically perform heavy labor

 Be able to qualify for use of a dust and mist respirator

 Valid Driver’s license

 The ability to obtain a chemical applicators license with space fumigation endorsement

Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR. As a prominent agribusiness company, we offer a competitive salary and benefits package. Including health insurance premiums currently paid 100% for the employee and their dependents, dental, vision and Rx coverage, 401k with company match, robust profit sharing plan, paid vacation, sick, holidays, and more. Closing date September 30, 2016, or until filled. Applications are available for download at http://www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Please send cover letter, application and resume to:

Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark

PO Box 344

Moro, OR 97039

Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277

Brittany@mcpcoop.com

Mid Columbia Producers is an equal opportunity employer. 9/30

FOR SALE:

PIGLETS. $50.00 1/2 Gloucestershire Old Spot 1/2 Hereford. 1 month old. Contact Melody for more info. 541-728-8465.  9/30

THE OLD OSKALOOSA/JUST-US INN. The Just Us-Inn is being run as an Airbnb and a boarding house. It has retained full occupancy since 2013. There is a 1 bedroom suite, with bathroom, and an additional 2 two bedroom suites. There is a large unfinished third floor space. On the property there are: two RV hook-up spaces, a community garden, a rental manufactured home. This property features room for development with sewer and electric ready to hook up. This property features four commercial lots. The owner is willing to carry contract, with substantial down payment, at an attractive rate. Hotel is three stories. The first floor has approx. 1500 square ft., large living room, kitchen, dining area, laundry area, and 1.5 baths. The Just-Us Inn is completely furnished with antiques and collectibles. The second floor has 5 guest rooms, storage room, studio apartment, 2.5 baths and also completely furnished and beautifully decorated. The 3rd floor is unfinished but plumbed and wired. A historical property, (The Old Oskaloosa Hotel), Just-Us Inn is located in Sherman County, Oregon, at the heart of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area; a land where time stand still. Sherman County is bordered to the north by the mighty Columbia River, world renowned for salmon & sturgeon fishing; to the east by the John Day River with exceptional steelhead & warm water bass fishing; and to the west by the Deschutes River, most of which is designated as Federal Wild, Scenic River, and State Scenic Waterway. People are drawn to the area to fly fish on world class rivers, white water rafting, windsurfing, golfing, hiking, mountain biking, all while enjoying the natural beauty that has become synonymous with the region. For sale by owner Please call Debbie 503-515-7374.   10/21

COMMERCIAL BUILDING :: JUST LISTED:: $81,700
702 EAST 1ST STREET RUFUS OREGON
MLS# 16225949
Contact Dan Pehlke for additional information 503-547-9140.

4900+SQ FT Commercial Concrete Building
150’X200′ 30,000 SQ FT Lot
Large open areas and 5 separate rooms with exterior entries
Unlimited possibilities. Off exit 109 of I-84. Rare Commercial Building in Rufus.  12/16

COMMERCIAL BUILDING :: JUST LISTED:: $65,000
1013 Clark St, Wasco Oregon
MLS# 16360875
Contact Dan Pehlke for additional information 503-547-9140.

670 +SQ FT Commercial Building
4800 SQ FT Lot
Rare Commercial building for sale in Wasco. Two individual office units with separate entries. New paint and flooring. Clean sharp building. Unlimited possibilities abound for this commercial property with fantastic street appeal.  12/16

HOME. 3 BR/ 2 BA $80,000. Why Rent? Your mortgage payment may be less than rent in this tidy, well kept mfg home located at 101 Sixth Street in Moro, OR

Master Suite has walk in closet; Nice deck and beautiful yard. Covered parking and a good size shed for your tools and toys. Come Home to Moro, excellent schools, friendly neighbors and a great community. Please call Ruby Mason- 541-980-9104- with questions or for a personal tour. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. Windermere GTRE- 541-386-3444.  10/14
JOHN DAY RIVER PROPERTY. I am offering for sale my undivided share of my family’s John Day River property. My 37.5% share of the 192 acre site comes to 72 acres at a recently appraised price of $1250 per acre valued at $90,000. A copy of the appraisal is available upon request. ~ Sharon Laughlin sjlaughlin@gorge.net  9/30

DOING BUSINESS WITH LOCAL PEOPLE. Sherman County Agri-Business Directory. http://co.sherman.or.us/agri_business.asp. 0/0

SERVICES: [home, personal, appliance, landscape, fencing, cleaning, maintenance, janitorial, computer, construction, sewing, repairs, transportation, media, preschool, day care, support & training]

REAL ESTATE SERVICES. Why hire just your average Realtor when you can hire one with years of successful negotiating experience and a proven track record of satisfied customers. Dan Pehlke, Principal Broker in Oregon, has just that. Now exclusively Powered by Cheri Belander Real Estate 802 W 6th St., The Dalles, OR  97058 & 1301 12th St., Hood River, OR 97031 Home of the 4.5% listing agreement with full representation and extreme networking with tremendous success. Give Dan Pehlke a call anytime at 503-547-9140 if you need to buy or sell real estate of any kind.  9/30

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES’ FREE MOBILE APP.  Sherman County businesses can now be found with your mobile phone! The John Day River Territory, a regional tourism marketing group representing Sherman, Gilliam, Wheeler and Grant counties, has developed a mobile app through MyChamberApp that lists businesses and helps you map your way to them (information is listed under John Day River Territory in Oregon). To download this free App see  http://co.sherman.or.us/agri_business.asp.  0/0
SHERMAN COUNTY AGRI-BUSINESS DIRECTORY. Sherman County businesses & services may be listed on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us under agri-business by town. Please contact Sherman County Administrative Assistant Lauren Hernandez lhernandez@co.sherman.or.us  0/0 

NEWSPAPERS

 FREE:

VISITOR INFORMATION SERVICES & EVENTS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

WANTED:

LOST OR FOUND:

FOR RENT:


2. Calendar (new or corrected)

clock.stopwatch.SEPTEMBER

1-30 Sherman County Historical Museum – Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families 1-5

1-30 Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series: Keith Blaylock Metal Art

30 Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Inductions 5:30 & Football Half-time

Sun-SoleOCTOBER

1 Memorial Service for Bert Long 11 Moro Community Presbyterian Church

1 Enrollment for the new 4-H year begins

1-2 Concours de Maryhill, Maryhill Arts Festival, Food, Music & Maryhill Loops

1-8 Gilliam County Days of Culture Events

1-20 Condon’s 6th Annual Scarecrow Contest

 

1-30 Gilliam County Historical Society Wednesdays through Sundays 1-5 p.m.

1-31 Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series: Patti Moore’s Fiber Arts

2-8 National 4-H Week

3 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10 Rufus Texas T-Bone

4 Vice Presidential Debate

5 Sherman County Court 9

5 Gilliam County Court 10

5 Wheeler County Court 10

5 Sherman County Job Club 11-12:30 Burnet Building, Moro

5 County-wide Prayer Meeting: Wasco Church of Christ Church 7:00-7:30PM fellowship.  7:30-9:00 PM Prayer Meeting

7-8 12th Annual Boardman Quilt Show 10-4 Boardman Senior Center 541-481-9426

8 Genealogy Jamboree 10-2:30 Discovery Center

9 CASA Fun Run

9 2nd Presidential Debate

10 COLUMBUS DAY

11 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 10-12 The Dalles

11 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

11 Sherman County Watershed Council Meeting 11:30 Burnet Building, Moro

11 Sherman County Medical Clinic’s Flu Shot Clinic 3-6 Moro

12 Sherman County Job Club 11-12:30 Burnet Building, Moro

12 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30 Senior Center

13 National Weather Service Open House 10-4 Pendleton Airport

15-16 Here & There Travel Fest, Oregon Convention Center

15-16 Oktoberfest to Benefit The Woolery in Arlington

17-21 Sherman County School District Homecoming Week

19 Sherman County Court 9

19 Sherman County Job Club 11-12:30 Burnet Building, Moro

19 3rd Presidential Debate

20 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Facility Board 10 NORCOR, The Dalles

20 Sherman County Quilting Ladies Day, Sherman County Historical Museum

24 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board 11-1 The Dalles

25 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board 1-3 The Dalles

26 Sherman County Job Club 11-12:30 Burnet Building, Moro

27 Tri-County Court Meeting 10 OSU Extension Office, Burnet Building

27 Regional Economic Development Strategy Meeting 8:30-11 Stevenson, WA

29 Sherman County Historical Museum Boots, Beer & Brats: Festival of Volunteers!

31 Sherman County Historical Museum closes for the season. Open by appointment November-April

31 HALLOWEEN

NOVEMBER

2 Sherman County Job Club 11-12:30 Burnet Building, Moro

2 County-wide Prayer Meeting: Moro Presbyterian Church 7:00-7:30PM fellowship.  7:30-9:00 PM Prayer Meeting

3 North Central Education Service District Board Meeting 6 Condon

6 Daylight Saving Time Ends

6 Sherman County Historical Society Fall Program 2

8 ELECTION DAY

8 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

9 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Committee 12:30 Sr. Center

9 Sherman County Job Club 11-12:30 Burnet Building, Moro

14-17 Association of Oregon Counties Conference, Eugene

11 VETERANS DAY

16 Sherman County Job Club 11-12:30 Burnet Building, Moro

19 Artists Marketing Workshop 1-4 Call 541-387-8877

19 Max Nogle Dinner/Dance Celebrating the 100 year birthday of the Grass Valley Pavilion

21 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board Meeting 1-3 The Dalles

24 THANKSGIVING DAY 

DECEMBER

3  Sherman County Historical Museum Christmas Open House & Museum Store Sale

3  Sherman County Bazaar & Christmas Tree Sale

7 Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 1941

7 County-wide Prayer Meeting: Wasco Methodist Church 7:00-7:30PM fellowship.  7:30-9:00 PM Prayer Meeting

21 First Day of Winter

22-30 Sherman School District Christmas Break

24 Christmas Eve

25 CHRISTMAS DAY

31 New Year’s Eve


 

Sherman County eNews #255

CONTENT

  1. No political signs on state highway right of way

  2. Oregon Days of Culture – Gilliam County Month of Culture, Oct. 1-8

  3. Art & Indescribable Things from an Eclectic Group of Artists, Oct. 5-8

  4. ODOT Notice: Heads-up for Traffic Delays OR206 & US97

  5. Sherman County Medical Clinic’s Flu Shot Clinic, Oct. 11

  6. Notice of Meeting: North Central Public Health District Executive Committee, Oct. 12


1. No political signs on state highway right of way

arrow.blueswishWith the November elections approaching, ODOT reminds campaigns:

  • Political signs may not be posted on any Oregon state highway right of way; and
  • There are restrictions for signs placed on private property visible from state highways.

No signs except official traffic control devices are allowed in the state highway right of way including on trees, utility poles, and fence posts within the highway right of way. Improperly placed signs, including political signs, may be removed and held by the local ODOT District Maintenance office.

Temporary signs, including political signs, are allowed on private property within view of state highways with the following restrictions:

  • The sign is limited to 12 square feet.
  • No flashing or intermittent lights, animated or moving parts are allowed.
  • Signs must not imitate an official highway sign or device.
  • Signs are not allowed in scenic areas.

Local municipalities may also regulate the placement of political signs.


2. Oregon Days of Culture – Gilliam County Month of Culture, Oct. 1-8

October 5th

–10:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Art & Indescribable Things: From an Eclectic Group of Artists, Memorial Hall in Condon; beverages & snacks 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

October 6th

10 a.m. This & every Thursday morning, Preschool Story Time with Silvia

11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Tasty Thursday at Holly’s General Mercantile, 25 S. Main St.

11 a.m. Cultural Walking Tour of Condon with Mac Stinchfield

October 8th

10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Condon Community Farmers’ Market, City Park

2 p.m. Author Yvonne Pepin-Wakefield & her book Babe in the Woods, Library.


3. Problem Gambling Awareness Day in Oregon News Release from Oregon Lottery

In honor of Problem Gambling Awareness Day, Tim Murphy, chief executive officer of Bridgeway Recovery Services and Barry Pack, acting director of the Oregon Lottery issue this joint statement.

Governor Brown has proclaimed Thursday, Sept. 29 as Problem Gambling Awareness Day in Oregon. We urge all Oregonians to pause a moment to reflect on the importance of connecting those suffering with problem gambling issues to the free treatment available to them from health providers throughout the state.

We are united in supporting problem gambling treatment. While it may seem surprising to some that a gambling recovery services executive and a lottery director are collaborating in this effort, we share common ground in our commitment to help those struggling with gambling problems. Treatment for gambling addiction is not only free, supported by Lottery revenues, but also effective. People can check out the Oregon Problem Gambling Resources website at www.opgr.org for information, an opportunity to chat with a counselor, or a referral to treatment.

Last month we toured the Bridgeway Recovery Services Treatment Center together and had the opportunity to meet with patients in treatment; a good beginning for a long and effective collaboration. The Oregon Lottery is committed to supporting and promoting treatment programs and training employees and retailer staff to provide information on problem gambling treatment services. Together our collaboration does good things for Oregon by strengthening our individual efforts to connect problem gamblers with treatment and positive outcomes.

Oregon Lottery proceeds provide funding for free, confidential and effective problem gambling treatment programs statewide. Since 1992, over $92 million in Lottery funds has been directed to fund problem gambling treatment.


 4. ODOT Notice: Heads-up for Traffic Delays OR206 & US97

According to Scott Peters, Oregon Department of Transportation will be conducting some overhead line work that will present traffic delays in both Fulton Canyon on OR206 and just south of Biggs on US97.  The work will start late October or early November.  The work will be done by helicopter, but the highways will need to be protected with equipment and traffic control on the roadway.  The contractor, Wilson Construction, is putting a schedule together, but it will likely be rather flexible since so many factors can influence. It is expected that it will be about 3-4 days on each highway with maximum delays no more than 20 minutes during daylight hours.

A heads-up! Expect delays to avoid being late for work or appointments, or choose an alternate route.  An update will be forthcoming as soon as the start date is confirmed.


5. Sherman County Medical Clinic’s Flu Shot Clinic, Oct. 11

hand.wash2The Sherman County Medical Clinic is having their annual Flu Shot Clinic!

Tuesday, October 11th from 3:00pm – 6:00pm

For more information visit us online at

www.shermancountymedicalclinic.net or call 541-565-3325.


6. Notice of Meeting: North Central Public Health District Executive Committee, Oct. 12

The North Central Public Health District Executive Committee will be meeting Wednesday, October 12, 2016 at 2:00 p.m. at North Central Public Health District, located at 419 E. 7th Street, in the Main Meeting Room (Annex A), in The Dalles, Oregon. This meeting is open to the general public.


 

Sherman County eNews #254

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Catholic Community Mass Schedule

  2. “Not so Hot Stretch/Kettle Bell Workout Mondays

  3. Oktoberfest 2016 for The Woolery Project in Arlington, Oct. 15-16

  4. Octoberfest at St. Peter’s Parish Center, The Dalles, Oct. 9

  5. Non-Profit Organization Looking for Community Area Representatives to Join our International Team

  6. It’s Now or Never to Save the Internet

  7. Finding the Positive in Frustration

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“The most dangerous man to any government is the man who is able to think things out for himself, without regard to the prevailing superstitions and taboos. Almost inevitably he comes to the conclusion that the government he lives under is dishonest, insane, and intolerable…”  ― H.L. Mencken, Prejudices: Third Series


 1. Sherman County Catholic Community Mass Schedule

church.family1

Sherman County Catholic Community

Mass Schedule

Starting October 1, 2016 thru March 31, 2017

Saturday evening mass

St. John the Baptist, Grass Valley   4:00pm

St. Mary, Wasco   5:30pm

Sunday Mass

St. Alphonsus, Dufur    8:30am

St. Mary, Maupin   11:00am

All are welcome ~ Please join us!


2. “Not so Hot Stretch/Kettle Bell Workout Mondays

“Not So Hot” Stretch/Kettle Bell Workout

When:  Mondays, 5:00-6:30pm

Where:  Wasco Annex, Music Room by Gym

Temperature:  80-85 degree

Cost: $20 per month

Come and enjoy time to focus on yourself!

While Roger Whitley takes some time off, stretches will be led by Molly Belshe.

Everyone’s welcome!


3. Oktoberfest 2016 for The Woolery Project in Arlington, Oct. 15-16

music.notes (2)SATURDAY, October 15

5k Run/Walk

Vendors in the Park

Music from Wheeler County Ramblers, One Hum & Jager Bumz

Family Fun Activities – Pumpkin Painting, Human Foosball, Bouncy House, Cow Pie Bingo and more

Prime Rib Dinner by Paradise Rose Chuckwagon Catering

Auction by Paul Thompson Auctioneers

Dance to the music of Countryfied! 

SUNDAY, October 16

4 Man Scramble: 18 Hole Golf Tournament, China Creek Golf Course

BBQ/Chilli Cook-off

Apple Streudel Contest

Horseshoe Contest 

Tickets: $35 Morrow County Grain Growers, Wasco; Arlington Hardware; Arlington Thrifty Market; Condon Chamber of Commerce; Murray Drug, Condon.

Vendors: Contact info@thewooleryprojectinc.org for an application and information.


4. Oktoberfest at St. Peter’s Parish Center, The Dalles, Oct. 9

music-notesSt. Peter’s Oktoberfest is Sunday, October 9th, 1 to 5 p.m. at the St. Peter’s Parish Center in The Dalles. Come join in the fun! Listen to the Polka Dots band. The Tyrollean Dancers will perform their old time German dances that will make you want to dance with them! Oktoberfest dinner will consist of: German Brats with Sauerkraut, Chicken, German Potato Salad, homemade pumpkin rolls. Dinners are $18 for adults and $20 with a beer. Dinners for children are $5. Our Biergarten will be serving German Beer, Buttery Pretzels and Cider. Every dinner ticket will be entered in a drawing for a door prize.


5. Non-Profit Organization Looking for Community Area Representatives to Join our International Team

ASSE International Student Exchange Programs is seeking individuals to serve as Area Representatives in your local community.  ASSE provides academic year and semester exchange programs in the United States for high school students from around the world.  Students are 15 to 18 years of age, have passed a series of academic and character requirements and are awaiting an opportunity to embark on their American Adventure.

Area Representatives recruit and screen prospective host families, interview students to study abroad and supervise the exchange students in their community.  Area representatives are compensated based on the number of students they are supervising. There is also a great bonus opportunity.

ASSE’s primary goal is to contribute to International understanding by enabling students to learn about other languages and cultures through active participation in family, school and community life. ASSE’s Area Representatives are the cornerstone of the organization, making all of this possible!

For more information about ASSE or becoming an Area Representative, please call our Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or email us at asseusawest@asse.com. We look forward to welcoming you to the ranks of Area Representatives nationwide – striving towards a world of understanding, one child at a time!


6. It’s Now or Never to Save the Internet

e-mail.worldBy Jim DeMint http://dailysignal.com/2016/09/26/its-now-or-never-to-save-the-internet/

We have, unfortunately, come to expect our elected representatives to shirk hard decisions. So it came as little surprise when the Senate released the text of a continuing resolution late last week to fund the U.S. government that did not include key objectives sought by conservatives, such as stopping taxpayer funding for Planned Parenthood.

Although there are many problems with this budget deal, only one is irreversible and permanent: allowing the Obama administration to cede oversight of the internet to foreign bodies. It’s troubling that the Senate has failed to include language prohibiting this transfer of power.

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is the nonprofit organization responsible for maintaining databases for internet domain names, essentially the phone book for the internet.

The Obama administration announced the goal of ending the U.S. contractual oversight of ICANN in 2014, and asked ICANN to submit a plan to fill the gap of U.S. withdrawal and to implement stronger accountability measures to make sure ICANN does not abuse its authority.

After two years of negotiations and effort, the Obama administration says that it is satisfied with the proposal even though it is incomplete.

Many of the reforms deemed necessary by the ICANN community to make ICANN accountable absent U.S. oversight will not be complete before next summer. Likewise, important legal questions that could threaten ICANN, the transition, or the stability of the internet remain unanswered. Finally, the new governance model is untested—we actually do not know if it will have the capability of governing ICANN and preventing it from abusing its authority.

Although there are many problems with this budget deal, only one is irreversible and permanent: allowing the Obama administration to cede oversight of the internet to foreign bodies.

Analysts at The Heritage Foundation warn that governments will gain new influence over the internet, that its freedom will suffer, and that ICANN leadership (both CEO Göran Marby and staff) will continue its troubling pattern of ignoring bylaws without the community holding leadership accountable.

This is important. Our economy and security are increasingly dependent on the internet. We should not be taking a blind leap into the unknown. But that is exactly what the Obama administration is proposing.

Lead Obama administration official Lawrence Strickling, administrator of National Telecommunications and Information Administration, has repeatedly said there’s not a hard deadline and that it’s better to get this right than get it done by a specific date.

But if the administration really believed that, why would it sign off on this incomplete proposal when it could extend the contract for a year and allow all of the reforms to be adopted and actually test the new ICANN governance systems to make sure that they work like they are supposed to work?

It is quite simply reckless, but it will happen unless Congress intervenes. Absent specific instruction otherwise from Congress, the contractual relationship between the U.S. government and ICANN will cease this Saturday—Oct. 1, 2016.

Once the U.S. lets the contract with ICANN end, there is no going back. The future of the internet is too important to risk on a half-baked proposal.

A free and secure internet is not just the concern of Americans, but of people across the world, especially those living under despotic regimes. Congress must think long and hard about allowing President Barack Obama to give away the internet—because right now, that’s what he’s on track to do. Congress has the power to stop this. Will it?

Call your Congressman now: 202-224-3121.


 7. Finding the Positive in Frustration

Today, let’s talk about frustration – a feeling all of us experience from time to time – and how to overcome it.

One of the roadblocks on the path to success is frustration. Everyone feels it from time to time. It’s kind of like anxiety with a little anger thrown in, isn’t it? You feel like a tiger in a cage, pacing back and forth, filled with tension and negative energy but accomplishing nothing. And that tension and negative energy represent both the danger and the opportunity in frustration.

The danger is the tension and the negativity, because negativity blocks all the positive feelings you need in order to keep going and solve the problems at hand – and you just can’t be very creative in a tension-filled environment. The opportunity in frustration is the energy, because it is the energy you want in order to overcome whatever obstacle you’re facing. As soon as you get the negative thinking under control, harnessing the energy is easy. “Ah-ha,” you may be saying, “there’s the catch.  If I could do that, I wouldn’t be frustrated.” Well, you can do it and it comes from changing your internal perspective on the situation.

At the very core of frustration is our attitude toward the situation at hand. Change the attitude and you change your perspective. It’s like looking at a portrait or landscape, perhaps on a wall in a museum or gallery, and shifting your physical position. That different angle gives you a different perspective, and you see things in the painting that you didn’t see before. Changing your “mental position” is just as simple. You are shifting from a fixed to more of a growth mindset, by giving yourself the opportunity to see things from a different perspective.

We teach people how to do it all the time. Cognitive psychologists teach people to do it, too. It’s simply a question of knowing how. If you’d like to learn how, pick up a copy of Dr. Martin Seligman’s book, “Learned Optimism.”  It will give you a simple technique you can use to minimize negative thoughts and substitute positive ones. It’s quite simple to master and it will make a big difference in your frustration level and the time and energy you spend spinning your wheels. ~ The Pacific Institute 


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.crow.fly How the middle of nowhere could become a major trade corridor  https://www.brookings.edu/blog/future-development/2016/09/23/how-the-middle-of-nowhere-could-become-a-major-trade-corridor/?utm_campaign=Brookings+Brief&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=34994238

This Infographic Shows How Only 10 Companies Own All The World’s Food Brands https://food.good.is/articles/food-brands-owners?utm_source=bw&utm_medium=FB&utm_campaign=pd

“The most dangerous man to any government is the man who is able to think things out for himself, without regard to the prevailing superstitions and taboos. Almost inevitably he comes to the conclusion that the government he lives under is dishonest, insane, and intolerable…”  ― H.L. Mencken, Prejudices: Third Series

Wasco County Approves Union Pacific Track Expansion Admid Maintenance Questions  http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/blog/sbo/2016/09/wasco-county-approves-union-pacific-track.html?ana=e_ae_set2&s=article_du&ed=2016-09-27&u=wkiE5IyNb4HDxutujUayRl7bhJ3&t=1475018656&j=75926272

The Long War Journal http://www.longwarjournal.org/

The Best Analysis of the Presidential Debate from Around the Web  http://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/news/2016/09/27/the-best-analysis-of-the-presidential-debate-from.html?ana=e_me_set1&s=newsletter&ed=2016-09-27&u=wkiE5IyNb4HDxutujUayRl7bhJ3&t=1474999123&j=75920752 

What we learned in Scandinavia about migrants http://www.wsj.com/articles/what-we-learned-in-scandinavia-about-migrants-1474932369?mod=rss_opinion_main

The Underground City of Derinkuyu Could Shelter As Many As 20,000 People & Reached A Depth of 60m http://brilliantmaps.com/derinkuyu/

A Message for the Snowflakes on Campus  http://bernardgoldberg.com/a-university-stands-up-for-free-speech/


 

Sherman County eNews #253

CONTENT

  1. Editorial Note: The “Editorial We”

  2. Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Inductions, Sept. 30

  3. Sherman Middle School Football/Volleyball 2016 Schedule Update

  4. Notice: Sherman County Court Regular Session, Oct. 5

  5. Concours de Maryhill, Maryhill Arts Festival, Food, Music & Maryhill Loops, Oct. 1 & 2

  6. Peak Performance: It’s in Your Mind


1. Editorial Note: The “Editorial We”

caricatureskEditorials present a publication’s opinion on an issue and are meant to influence public opinion, promote critical thinking, and sometimes cause people to take action on an issue.

 

 

For the editor and publisher of Sherman County eNews,

it is the “editorial we”

n.

The first-person plural pronoun used by an editorialist  in expressing the opinion or point of view of a publication’s management.

“We” put the questions together and published them in an editorial, eNews #248.

Our editorial intent is to provide a menu of questions for eNews subscribers to ask the candidates. We did not invite the candidates to submit answers to the questions.

Sherry Kaseberg, Editor/Publisher

Sherman County eNews 1999-current.


2. Sherman County School District Hall of Honor, Sept. 30

Hall of Honor Press Release - JPG


3. Sherman Middle School Football/Volleyball 2016 Schedule Update

middleschoolfb-vb-9-16update


4. Notice: Sherman County Court Regular Session, Oct. 5

The Sherman County Court is meeting in regular session on Wednesday, October 5, 2016, at 9:00 a.m. in the Circuit Courtroom at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, OR 97039.

cocourt-agenda-october-5-2016_page_1

cocourt-agenda-october-5-2016_page_2


5. Concours de Maryhill, Maryhill Arts Festival, Food, Music & Maryhill Loops, Oct. 1 & 2

Car 2Celebrate Sam Hill’s love of roads, the automobile, and the arts during this two-day, family-friendly festival devoted to creativity in all its forms. ALL ACTIVITIES ARE FREE!

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2016

Concours de Maryhill | 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Open car show featuring autos 1945 and older, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the dedication of the Columbia Gorge Scenic Highway. Want to enter your car? Click here for more information.

Maryhill Arts Festival | 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Browse and shop booths featuring Northwest artists working in a variety of media, including painting, glass art, jewelry, woodworking, ceramics and more.

Drive the Maryhill Loops Road | Noon to 2 p.m.
Take a spin past the beautiful scenery and through the road’s eight hairpin curves. Free on the historic Maryhill Loops Road, located just east of US 97 off of State Route 14.

Family Fun: Veggie Car Races | 1 to 3 p.m.
Kids put their ingenuity to work transforming humble veggies into fantastically engineered cars and race them on a 12-foot ramp for thrills and chills.

Dining | 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Several locally operated food vendors will be on-site – Bake My Day during the day and Bob’s Texas T-Bone for dinner – as well as Loïe’s: The Museum Café inside Maryhill Museum of Art.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2016

car_redMaryhill Loops Hill Climb | 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Vintage sports cars from the 1930s to 1960s race singly in a three-mile timed climb up the historic Maryhill Loops Road; view from the Highway 97 Overlook and from designated points along the route.

Maryhill Arts Festival | 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Browse and shop booths featuring Northwest artists working in a variety of media, including painting, glass art, jewelry, woodworking, ceramics and more.

Dining | 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Enjoy lunch, light snacks, beer and wine at Loïe’s: The Museum Café inside Maryhill Museum of Art.

Music | 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Enjoy the bluegrass and Americana sounds of The Ryders from Seattle. (Artists will take breaks throughout the day.)


6. Peak Performance: It’s in Your Mind

Today, here are a few words about peak performance aimed at everyone who would like to improve at a sport or game, and we are not talking about performance-enhancing substances.

People are finally starting to realize that “the right stuff” isn’t something you have to be born with. The fact that we can learn to tap previously unexplored potential has been quickest, perhaps, to take hold in the world of professional sports. However, the principles involved will work just as well for weekend athletes and high school athletes, as well.

One of the best-known techniques, for what sports psychologists and counselors call “performance enhancement,” is visualization. Now, visualization is simply a form of mental practice. It’s performing the different aspects of your sport over and over again in your mind, with all the right moves and the desired end result. You can do this with your eyes closed in a quiet room, riding the bus, in the shower, while you’re waiting to see the dentist – virtually any time.

Michael Jordan, arguably the best basketball player of his generation (if not several others) shot thousands of baskets in practice, on the court. He shot many more thousands, sitting on planes, trains and automobiles. With his eyes shut, seeing and feeling those shots in his mind. It’s a safe bet that most of the athletes at the Rio Olympics and Para-Olympics were doing the same thing before their contests.

All that’s required is that you see yourself performing – driving the ball, throwing the javelin, clearing the bar. It doesn’t matter what the action is, as long as you are doing it perfectly. Because, you see, your subconscious doesn’t know the difference between a vividly imagined picture and the actual event. And while mental practice can’t replace the discipline and hard work of physical practice, in some ways it’s even better. It guarantees that you are practicing perfection, and when you practice perfection, you are far more likely to perform perfectly.

Now, take this same practice and apply it to your interactions with people at work. Apply it to what your job requires you do. Apply it to the goals – personal, professional and organizational – you want to achieve, and watch your performance soar! ~ The Pacific Institute


 

Sherman County eNews #251

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2016 Fall Grant Cycle Deadline, Sept. 30     
  2. Sherman County Court Notes, Sept. 21
  3. Sherman Development League Grant/Loan Applications
  4. Big Tobacco Targets Youth                                    
  5. Tri-County Hazardous Waste & Recycling Steering Committee Meeting, Sept. 28
  6. Cemetery Association of Oregon Conference, Oct. 28-29
  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

1. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2016 Fall Grant Cycle Deadline, Sept. 30

BeeSherman County Cultural Coalition
2016 Fall Grant Applications

Sherman County Cultural Coalition Fall Grant Applications are available. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: September 30, 2016

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Mail or email requests for Grant Guidelines and Grant Application to:

Sherman County Cultural Coalition
P.O. Box 23
Moro, OR 97039 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


2. Sherman County Court Notes, Sept. 21

~ By Administrative Assistant Lauren Hernandez

(A brief summary of topics addressed – not official minutes. For details, please see the official approved minutes posted after the October 5 Court session on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us)

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court met in regular session on September 21, 2016, and in conducting the business of the county,

  • heard from Rod Asher, Weed District Director, the highest possible expense was budgeted for the new Lower Deschutes Cooperative Weed Management Area Coordinator, but health care and PERS expenses are lower than estimated which generated a savings of $19,148; Rod requested to use these funds to purchase additional equipment for the Lower Deschutes Project (LDP), including a Polaris Ranger, a 14’ trailer, a 50 gallon sprayer, and a storage basket; the Court approved the request to spend $19,135 of Lower Deschutes CWMA Coordinator cost savings to purchase additional equipment for the LDP; Rod reported the LDP has been offered an additional $10,000 as part of in-lieu-of-tax money funneled through the Wasco County Soil and Water Conservation District; these funds need to be spent by November 15, 2016, and Rod requested to use them to purchase a computer and mapping software, to stock up on supplies like backpacks and sprayers, and to stock up on herbicides; the Court approved the request to spend the additional funds provided by Wasco County for the Weed Department for a computer, software, and additional supplies and herbicides; the Weed Department is in the market for another surplus vehicle;
  • heard from Rod he obtained three quotes for hazardous tree limb removal and tree maintenance at DeMoss Park; twenty-seven trees have significant damage; Luciano’s Tree and Maintenance Service quoted $13,500 total, $500 per tree; Columbia Tree Service quoted $3,500 per day and estimated three days; Trees Company LLC quoted $12,500; the trees will be trimmed, and there are no plans to remove any, though if it becomes necessary for safety reasons, Rod will be notified before a decision is made; the Court accepted a quote from Columbia Tree Service in the amount of $10,500 for tree trimming in DeMoss Park and will verify if funds are available in the Parks and Recreation fund;
  • heard a quarterly report from Mark Coles, Road Master; the Road Department is looking for another dust control unit to use at the rock pit; the Court recommended the purchase of two DV 30 sprayers up to $48,000, providing the funds are available in the Equipment Reserve;
  • heard from Shawn Payne, Emergency Services Director, the Ambulance Service Area (ASA) Plan was revised in 2015 and reduced the ASA committee to six positions; in the past, this restructure was approved by County Court and the Oregon Health Authority; Commissioner Smith suggested the ASA committee should come together and approve of changing the structure of the board as a group; Shawn will call an ASA committee meeting so this can be addressed;
  • heard from Katie Paul, Sherman County Community Outreach, Ron Webber will be providing Moral Reconation Therapy (MRT), an evidence-based cognitive behavioral program, to referred Sherman County Tri-County Corrections clients; the Wasco Annex will be adequate space for the program; the Court approved the Consulting Services Contract between Sherman County and Ron Webber to perform work for Sherman County Community Outreach to expire June 30, 2017, and authorized Judge Thompson to sign pending approval by County Counsel; the Court also approved the Lease of Business Property between Sherman County and Sherman County Community Outreach to use a room at the Wasco Annex at a cost of zero dollars for a term to end on June 30, 2017, and authorized Judge Thompson to sign;
  • heard from Shandie Johnson, Prevention Coordinator, and Darian Davis, Oregon Youth Conservation Corps (OYCC) Crew Member, a report on OYCC activities; Shandie stated she was impressed by how well the team worked together and how they overcame issues; work credits are available for crew members, and Shandie will send letters to parents to notify them; the OYCC end of year report has been submitted but has not yet been approved;
  • Shandie discussed the setup of the Prevention Coordinator; a part-time positon allows for the majority of funds to be used for direct programs like Swim Bus, Missoula Children’s Theater, and more; part time is challenging, however, because attending trainings and finding time to obtain the Certified Prevention Specialist (CPS) certification was difficult; if the position were to expand to ¾ time, the coordinator could devote more time to forming a coalition, attending trainings, and obtaining the CPS certification, but this would affect the amount of funding allocated to support programs; discussion was held about the possibility of expanding the coordinator position to ¾ time and the county offering additional funds to help support direct services through the Prevention Program; discussion was held about the possibility of contracting the position out to another entity, though the Court feels strongly the employee needs to be physically based in Sherman County to be effective; contracting with another agency like Mid-Columbia Center for Living or North Public Central Health District would allow the county to access more resources and to complete tasks that are difficult for a single employee to do; the Court will explore opportunities to contract before advertising for the position;
  • approved the contract renewal offer from Otis Elevator Company to accept a five-percent discount on the current maintenance price for five years in exchange for a five-year extension to the existing maintenance contract term and authorized Judge Thompson to sign;
  • approved paying for the cost of an income survey on behalf of South Sherman Fire & Rescue District up to $5401.50 to assist with pursuing a Community Development Block Grant to support construction of a new fire hall;
  • approved a letter of resignation from Shandie Johnson, Prevention Coordinator, to be effective September 30, 2016;
  • approved a Memorandum of Understanding between Oregon Affordable Housing Assistance Corporation and Sherman County to provide foreclosure prevention and community housing stabilization through direct assistance to homeowners and authorized Judge Thompson to sign;
  • entered into Biggs Service District Board of Directors; hired Anderson Perry & Associates to write a United States Department of Agriculture grant application for $10,000 and to perform an environmental study for $15,000 for a total of $25,000;
  • discussed Philippi Park grant funding, a thank you letter from the Wasco School Centennial Celebration Committee, an Eastern Oregon Counties Association Invoice, the Notice of Depositions for unfunded mandate litigation, a student funding request, the Wasco Annex article for the Reporter, and a fiber update;
  • heard reports from Court members about regional board activities.

3. Sherman Development League Grant/Loan Applications

BeeSherman Development League (SDL) grant application forms for projects and/or programs in Sherman County are now available. Grants can be applied for by 501(c)(3) and other non-profit organizations. Organizations that have received a grant from SDL are not eligible to apply until their current grant requirements have been met. Revolving loan funds are also available to for-profit entities and businesses.

Applications will be accepted until November 15, 2016, and grants will be awarded by February 1, 2017.

To receive appropriate grant/loan application forms, please submit a letter of request which includes:

Ø A brief description of your project.
Ø State if the project is a capital expenditure, one-time program or pilot project, emergency assistance or a loan request.
Ø Identify the type of organization requesting funding.

Mail or email requests to:

Sherman Development League, Inc.
P.O. Box 11
Moro, OR 97039
shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com


4. Big Tobacco Targets Youth

• The use of nicotine during adolescence can disrupt the formation of brain circuits that control attention, learning, and susceptibility to addiction. According to Oregon Health Authority e-cigarette use has increased at alarming rates, especially in young people in Oregon. In Oregon alone, e-cigarette use among high school youth has more than tripled from 5.2% in 2013 to 17.1% in 2015.

• 90% of smokers started before the age of 18. Department of Health and Human Services reported out of middle and high school students who used tobacco products in 2014, more than 60% smoked flavored tobacco. Kids are being attracted to e-cigarettes who would otherwise not be attracted to tobacco products because of appealing flavors such as watermelon, bubble gum, chocolate and more.

• In 2015 a study from The Journal of The American Medical Association reports minors successfully placed 75 orders with 23 unsuccessful purchases from 98 different online vendors. Only five were rejected for age verification, concluding that 93.7% of e-cigarette vendors failed to properly verify their customers’ ages.

Want to quit smoking?
1-800-QUIT-NOW (800-748-8669) or
1-800-DEJELO-YA (Espanol)

Tobacco Prevention and Education Program
North Central Public Health District
www.ncphd.org
541-506-2609
www.smokefreeoregon.com


 5. Tri-County Hazardous Waste & Recycling Steering Committee Meeting, Sept. 28

recycle.blwhThe Tri-County Hazardous Waste & Recycling Program’s Steering Committee will be meeting Wednesday September 28th, 2016 from 8:30-11:30 am at the Wasco County Planning Department, located at 2705 East 2nd Street in The Dalles, Oregon. Representatives from the member agencies of the counties of Wasco, Sherman and Hood River, and the cities of The Dalles, Hood River, Cascade Locks, Mosier, Dufur and Maupin will hold their meeting to discuss approval of minutes, fiscal & progress reports, lead agency, budget, status of facilities, staffing, grants and other miscellaneous items.

The nine governments signed an intergovernmental agreement in November 2003 to build and operate two permanent household hazardous waste collection facilities in Hood River and The Dalles, and conduct satellite collection events throughout the region. Wasco County is the lead agency. The facilities and events collect hazardous wastes from households, businesses and institutions which are Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generators, as well as pesticide wastes from farmers and ranchers.For more information: Call Tri-County Hazardous Waste & Recycling Program at (541) 506-2636.


6. Cemetery Association of Oregon Conference, Oct. 28-29

Join the Cemetery Association of Oregon (CAO) at their annual fall conference in Lincoln City, Oct. 28-29. Registration for the conference can be found on the CAO website here. As a courtesy to Oregon Historic Cemeteries the CAO will waive the conference fees to Oregon historic cemeteries (excluding lodging, the social hour, Saturday dinner, and golf). You have a historic cemetery if your cemetery has at least one burial of a person who died before February 14, 1909. Make sure to mark this on your registration form with the name and date of burial of the decedent in your cemetery to qualify. The CAO will be hosting a cleanup day at Eureka Cemetery on Oct. 28th, a list of conference activities and speakers can be found here on the CAO website. If you have any questions reach out the CAO at cemeteryassociationoforegon@gmail.com


 7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do 

Oregon.BeaverVote No to Measure 97: Measure 97 on Oregon’s November 2016 ballot would impose the biggest tax increase in Oregon history: a sales tax on steroids, hidden behind the facade of being a $3 billion annual Gross Receipts Tax on business. It will raise taxes by $600 per capita. http://cascadepolicy.org/blog/2016/08/25/cascade-policy-institute-says-no-to-measure-97/

 Mid Columbia Producers (cooperative) http://www.mcpcoop.com/

Oregon Land Use http://cascadepolicy.org/land-use/

 Can Government Be Run Like A Business? http://cascadepolicy.org/blog/2013/07/30/can-government-be-run-like-a-business/

 I Was RFK’s Speechwriter. Now I’m Voting for Trump. Here’s Why. The Democratic Party has become something both JFK and RFK would deplore—the party of war. By Adam Walinsky September 21, 2016 http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/09/rfk-trump-2016-democratic-party-speechwriter-214270

Sen. Bill Hansell https://www.oregonlegislature.gov/hansell

Oregon State Legislature: Find Your Legislator  https://www.oregonlegislature.gov/FindYourLegislator/leg-districts.html


 

Sherman County eNews #252

CONTENT

  1. Artists Marketing Workshop, Nov. 19

  2. Restore Oregon’s Heritage Barn Workshop, Oct. 1

  3. American Indian Trade Blanket Expert Barry Friedman

    Featured at Maryhill Museum of Art October 15

  4. Oregon Law: Sole-source procurements

  5. NOAA Opens House on October 13th

  6. Efficiency vs. Effectiveness

  7. U.S. Census, Sherman County Quick Facts

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


Remember that no one can hurt your feelings without your cooperation and willingness. No one can cause you to have any kind of emotional reaction without your first giving them permission to do so. You alone are responsible for your feelings and emotions. When you know what you plan to do with your life, you will not allow annoying situations to deter you from your goals for long. If you set ambitious goals for yourself and work enthusiastically toward them, you will quickly realize that you don’t have time to allow petty annoyances to upset you and keep you from your objectives. ~ Napoleon Hill


1.Artists Marketing Workshop, Nov. 19

paint.brushesNovember 19, 2016, 1-4pm
Instructor: Kerry Cobb
Workshop Fee: $20/person

This workshop is designed specifically for artists who wish to learn better techniques for marketing and selling their art. Topics include Self-Promotion Tools, Branding, Understanding Your Customer, Marketing Platforms, The Personal Touch, Marketing as an Integral Part of Your Artist Life.

Kerry Cobb is the Executive Director of the Columbia Center for the Arts and has over 30 years of direct marketing, promotions, and public relations experience. Space is limited to 30 students. See https://www.columbiaarts.org/events/artists-marketing-workshop/.


 2. Restore Oregon’s Heritage Barn Workshop, Oct. 1

barnEastern Oregon Barn Families! If you are interested in participating in a Barn Workshop on the east side of the state, please notify

EASTERN OREGON Agritourism Project
Janet E. Dodson, Consultant/Coordinator
North Powder, Oregon
janetd@eoni.com
541.786.8006 or 541.898.2620

There is nothing more iconic than a great old barn standing proud on the agricultural landscape.  Yet these icons pose special challenges for those wishing to preserve them and the stories they hold. Champoeg State Park and its historic Donald Manson Barn (1862), one of the few remaining Pioneer-era barns still standing in the Willamette Valley, will be the site of Restore Oregon’s annual Heritage Barn Workshop set for October 1st. The day-long workshop will feature speakers, hands-on training, examples of creative reuse, and sessions on barn condition assessment and stabilization. Over the course of the day there will be a demonstration on historic barn construction techniques and tools. Barn owners, preservationists, and the general public are invited with no previous knowledge needed to participate.

Restore Oregon’s Heritage Barn Workshop <http://restoreoregon.org/event/barns/>

October 1, 2016 9am to 4pm

Champoeg State Park

8239 Champoeg Road NE

(just SW of Wilsonville and SE of Newburg)

Tickets are $35 for Restore Oregon members; $45 for non-members and must be purchased in advance at http://www.RestoreOregon.org&lt;http://www.RestoreOregon.org&gt; or by calling 503 243-1923. Snacks, beverages, and lunch are included in the registration fee.  Underwriting by Greenline Fine Woodworking and New Energy Works Timberframers made this program possible.


3. American Indian Trade Blanket Expert Barry Friedman
Featured at Maryhill Museum of Art October 15

Program includes gallery walkthrough and blanket appraisal

bird.eagle1(GOLDENDALE, Wash., September 21, 2016) Maryhill Museum of Art is pleased to host author and antique American Indian trade blanket specialist Barry Friedman for a gallery walkthrough and appraisal program titled Barry Friedman’s Walkin’ Talkin’ Indian Trade Blanket Lecture on Saturday, October 15 at 2 p.m.

During the program, Friedman, author of Chasing Rainbows: Collecting American Indian Trade & Camp Blankets (2003) and Still Chasing Rainbows: Collecting American Indian Trade & Camp Blankets, Volume Two (2014), will give a brief introduction to trade blankets and then lead a walkthrough of the exhibition A Kaleidoscope of Color: American Indian Trade Blankets. The exhibition, which is on view through November 15, 2016 at Maryhill, features boldly colored pre-1925 blankets from a variety of well-known historic American manufacturers such as J. Capps & Sons, Racine, Oregon City and Pendleton Woolen Mills among others.

After the gallery tour, Friedman, who is a vintage blanket consultant to Pendleton Woolen Mills and a vintage blanket supplier to Ralph Lauren, will provide appraisals of visitors’ own trade blankets. The appraisal segment of the program is designed to be educational in nature, with the audience invited to listen in and learn about the history, designs and cultural significance of the trade blankets brought in by visitors.

Both the gallery walkthrough and the appraisals are free with museum admission. Out of consideration of the museum environment, visitors are asked to make sure their blankets are free of dust and dander.

A Kaleidoscope of Color: American Indian Trade Blankets is sponsored in part by the J & S Bishop Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation.


4. Oregon Law: Sole-source procurements

OregonLaws.org 279B.075¹ http://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/279B.075

(1) A contracting agency may award a contract for goods or services without competition if the Director of the Oregon Department of Administrative Services, a local contract review board, a state contracting agency, if the state contracting agency has procurement authority under ORS 279A.050 (Procurement authority), the State Chief Information Officer, with respect to goods or services described in subsection (2)(b) of this section and if the director has delegated the necessary authority to the State Chief Information Officer, or a person designated in writing by the director, board or state contracting agency with procurement authority under ORS 279A.050 (Procurement authority), determines in writing, in accordance with rules adopted under ORS 279A.065 (Model rules generally), that the goods or services, or class of goods or services, are available from only one source.

(2) The determination of a sole source must be based on written findings that may include:

(a) That the efficient utilization of existing goods requires acquiring compatible goods or services;

(b) That the goods or services required to exchange software or data with other public or private agencies are available from only one source;

(c) That the goods or services are for use in a pilot or an experimental project; or

(d) Other findings that support the conclusion that the goods or services are available from only one source.

(3) To the extent reasonably practical, the contracting agency shall negotiate with the sole source to obtain contract terms that are advantageous to the contracting agency. [2003 c.794 §55; 2005 c.103 §8c; 2015 c.807 §24]


5. NOAA’s National Weather Service Opens House, Oct. 13

weather-rainThe public is invited to an open house hosted by NOAA’s National Weather Service on Thursday October 13 from 10 am to 3 pm. The Open House will be at the regional Weather Forecast Office, which on the west side of the Pendleton, Oregon airport, located at 2001 NW 56th Drive.

The Open House will feature demonstrations to highlight the technology and expertise used to produce weather forecasts and warnings for eastern Oregon and Washington. There will also be displays from Life Flight, Oregon Department of Transportation, Emergency Management, and the Unmanned Aerial Systems (drones) Test Range. Also planned is a special fire weather balloon release that will be tracked thousands of feet into the atmosphere.

Refreshments will be provided and attendees will have a chance to win door prizes. More information will be updated at weather.gov/Pendleton and also on Facebook.


6. Efficiency vs. Effectiveness

teamworkPuzzleDid you know that there is an important difference between efficiency and effectiveness? Let’s talk about that difference and, more importantly, why it matters.

Most businesses focus a lot of energy on running an efficient operation – efficient in the sense that things get done with a minimum of effort and motion. It’s low input and high output. In other words, efficiency is doing things right. But doing what things? Ah-ha! This is a very important question.

You see, effectiveness should be doing the right things right. And effectiveness is what you want to aim for, because you can be extremely efficient at doing the wrong things. You can practice the wrong technique or the wrong moves until you’ve got it down perfectly. And then you’re going to wonder and worry about why you’re not doing any better, why the business is failing, why your customers don’t come back when everything is running like a well-oiled machine.

So when you visualize yourself or your business, don’t just see yourself doing things right. See yourself doing the right things right. And remember that sometimes the right thing done imperfectly can beat the heck out of a flawless performance of the wrong thing. Edward Deming, the originator of the total quality management movement, once said that if you run a company on numbers alone, you are sure to fail, because the most important numbers are unknown and unknowable.

It is possible that one of the things he meant was don’t worry so much about doing things right, and concentrate instead on doing the right things. Not such a bad thing to teach our children, as well. ~ The Pacific Institute


 7. U.S. Census, Sherman County Quick Facts

constitution-wethepeoplehttp://www.census.gov/quickfacts/table/PST045215/41055

POPULATION, est. 2015

1,680 est. July 1, 2015  (1,765 2010 census)

3.7% under age 5

18% under age 18

25% age 65 +

50.2% females

2.5% foreign-born

204 veterans

HOUSING

913 housing units (918 in 2010)

64% owner-occupied housing units

HEALTH

13.8% persons with disabilities under age 65 2010-2014

11.3% persons without health insurance under age 65 2010-2014

ECONOMY

57% civilian labor force age 16 and over 2010-2014

49.4% civilian labor force females age 16 and over

254 total health care & social assistance receipts/revenue 2012

INCOME & POVERTY

$39,960 median household income 2014 dollars

$27,427 per capita income past 12 months 2010-2014

14.2& persons in poverty

BUSINESS

53 total employer establishments 2014

448 employment 2014

105 non-employer establishments 2014

GEOGRAPHY

2.1 population per square mile

823.69 square miles land area.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

birdHappyOwlOregon Gubernatorial Debate: Brown, Pierce clash on rural issues  http://portlandtribune.com/pt/9-news/324508-204143-brown-pierce-clash-on-rural-issues

Internet: Rural Technology Group  http://ruraltechnologygroup.com/fixed-wireless.html 

Frontier Regional 911 Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/frontierregional911/

Oregon Office of Emergency Management 911 https://www.oregon.gov/OMD/OEM/Pages/or911/911_program.aspx

U.S. Census: Oregon Quick Facts https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/table/PST045215/41/accessible

Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Building Codes, Other Services  http://mccog.com/building-codes/

North Carolina made drug testing mandatory for welfare recipients  http://usherald.com/north-carolina-just-made-drug-testing-mandatory-welfare-recipients-results-far-worse-anyone-expected/

Commentary. Thomas Sowell: Our Predicament http://m.arkansasonline.com/news/2016/sep/22/our-predicament-20160922/ 

The American Spectator  http://spectator.org/about/ 

Ed “Good Entertainer, but a Great Marine” McMahon Flew 85 Combat Missions in Korea!  https://www.warhistoryonline.com/korean-war/ed-mcmahon-entertainer.html?utm_source=getresponse&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=warhistoryonline&utm_content=%5BWar+History+Online%5D+Your+Daily+Dose

 Ben Stein’s Diary: The Meaning of Deplorable http://spectator.org/the-meaning-of-deplorable/

21 Best World Atlases For Map Lovers In 2016 http://brilliantmaps.com/world-atlas/

The Shade of Red Each Country Has On Its Flag http://brilliantmaps.com/the-shade-of-red-each-country-has-on-its-flag/

The Mark of Soros: Charlotte, North Carolina http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2016/09/the_mark_of_soros_charlotte_north_carolina.htm

Opening of The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture in Washington D.C. – Are Cracker, White Trash, & Redneck Racist? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIIt-gTHWOY 

Hillary Clinton for President http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/25/opinion/sunday/hillary-clinton-for-president.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=opinion-c-col-top-region&region=opinion-c-col-top-region&WT.nav=opinion-c-col-top-region&_r=0