Sherman County eNews #22

Table of Contents

  1. Sherman Basketball Updates
  2. Congressman Walden’s Town Hall, Jan. 22
  3. An Invitation! Dorothy Benson’s 80th Birthday Party, Feb. 7
  4. How Iowa Caucus Works
  5. Overland Through Eastern Oregon 2015
  6. Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) at Columbia Gorge Community College Campus
  7. Oregon National Guard Welcomed Home 116th Air Control Squadron
  8. Links

 


1.Sherman Basketball Updates

clothing.shoesSaturday, January 23rd:

  • Girls JV has been changed to a 2 quarter game now starting at 11:30.
  • All remainder games will stay at their original times.

2. Congressman Walden’s Town Hall, Jan. 22

American flag2I’d like to invite you to a community town hall meeting I am holding in Sherman County on Friday, January 22nd. The meeting location and details are listed below, and it’d be great to see you there.

I regularly visit and hold meetings in each of the 20 counties in our nearly 70,000 square mile district. In fact, I held 29 town halls in 2015 alone, at least one in each county, and I’ll be kicking off this year’s town hall schedule in Rufus. While these town halls require a lot of “windshield time” in the car, I rely on the visits as one way to help me stay in close touch with local communities, and they’re where I get my “to do” list to take back to our nation’s capital.

At the meeting, I’ll provide an update on my work to grow the economy in Oregon and answer questions. You can reach my office in Oregon toll-free at (800) 533-3303 if you have any questions about the community meeting.

What: Sherman County Town Hall Meeting

When: Friday, January 22, 2016 at 9:00 am

Where: Bob’s Texas T-Bone, 101 East 1st Street, Rufus

Thank you for considering attendance at this town hall meeting. I hope to see you Friday. It is an honor to represent you in the U.S. Congress.

Best Regards,

Greg Walden

U.S. Representative

Oregon’s Second District


3. An Invitation! Dorothy Benson’s 80th Birthday Party, Feb. 7

She’s going to be 80!

birthdaycake.candles

Let’s celebrate

Dorothy Benson

on

Sunday, February 7th

from one until three o’clock

with

birthday cake and ice cream

at the

Sherman County Senior & Community Center

in Moro!


4. How Iowa Caucus Works

http://2016iowacaucus.com/how-iowa-caucus-works/

The Iowa presidential caucuses are local party precinct meetings where registered Republicans and Democrats gather, discuss the candidates and vote for by party preference to elect delegates to the 99 county conventions and choose their candidate for their party’s nomination.

The purpose of the caucus vote is to select delegates to attend a county convention. Each caucus sends a certain number of delegates, based on the population it represents. The delegates at the county convention in turn select delegates to go to the congressional district state convention, and those delegates choose the delegates that go to the national convention.

 

Presidential preference on the Republican side is done with a straw vote of those attending the caucus. This vote is sometimes done by a show of hands or by dividing themselves into groups according to candidate. In precincts that elect only 1 delegate they choose the delegate by majority vote and it must be a paper ballot.

 

The Democrats have a more complex system. In a typical caucus, registered democrats gather at the precinct meeting places (there are close to 2,000 precincts statewide), supporters for each candidate have a chance to make their case, and then the participants gather into groups supporting particular candidates (undecided voters also cluster into a group). In order for a particular group to be viable, they must have a certain percentage of the all the caucus participants. If they don’t have enough people, the group disbands, and its members go to another group. The percentage cut-off is determined by the number of delegates assigned to the precinct.

 

Democratic candidates must receive at least 15 percent of the votes in that precinct to move on to the county convention. If a candidate receives less than 15 percent of the votes, supporters of non-viable candidates have the option to join a viable candidate group, join another non-viable candidate group to become viable, join other groups to form an uncommitted group or chose to go nowhere and not be counted. Non-viable groups have up to 30 minutes to realign, if they fail to do so in that time, they can ask the for more time, which is voted on by the caucus as a whole. If the caucus refuses, re-alignment is done and delegates are awarded. A “third party” may hold a convention to nominate one candidate for president and one for vice president as well. The results of this caucus activity on both the Democratic and Republican sides are not binding on the elected delegates, but the delegates usually feel obligated to follow the wishes expressed by the caucus-goers. Thus the initial caucus results provide a good barometer of the composition of Iowa’s national delegation.

 

It breaks down like this:

If the precinct has only one delegate, the group with the most people wins the delegate vote, and that’s it.

If the precinct has only two delegates, each group needs 25 percent to be viable. If the precinct has only three delegates, each group needs one-sixth of the caucus participants. If the precinct has four or more delegates, each group needs at least 15 percent of the caucus participants.

Once the groups are settled, the next order of business is to figure out how many of that precinct’s delegates each group (and by extension, each candidate) should win.

In order for a particular group to be viable, they must have a certain percentage of the all the caucus participants. If they don’t have enough people, the group disbands, and its members go to another group. The percentage cut-off is determined by the number of delegates assigned to the precinct.

 

It breaks down like this:

If the precinct has only one delegate, the group with the most people wins the delegate vote, and that’s it.

If the precinct has only two delegates, each group needs 25 percent to be viable. If the precinct has only three delegates, each group needs one-sixth of the caucus participants. If the precinct has four or more delegates, each group needs at least 15 percent of the caucus participants. Once the groups are settled, the next order of business is to figure out how many of that precinct’s delegates each group (and by extension, each candidate) should win.


5. Overland Through Eastern Oregon 2015

wheel.tire


6. Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) at Columbia Gorge Community College Campus

 

Columbia Gorge Community College and Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) offers two pesticide license recertification courses on February 18 at the Hood River Indian Creek Campus. Hazard Communication meets from 8:00 to noon and participants receive 3 credits.

 

Worker Protection Standard meets from 1-5 and participants receive 4 core credits.Participants wishing to receive core credit hours must provide the required information to Department of Agriculture during class.

 

The workshops are free. Pre-registration is required by calling the college at 541.506.6011, or online at www.cgcc.edu.


7. Oregon National Guard Welcomed Home 116th Air Control Squadron

American flag2PORTLAND, Oregon — More than 90 Citizen-Airmen from the Oregon Air National Guard’s 116th Air Control Squadron (ACS) are scheduled to be welcomed home in a formal demobilization ceremony at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, Jan. 22, at 1:00 p.m. The 116th ACS, based at Camp Rilea, in Warrenton, Oregon, is a deployable air control and radar/communications unit. Members of the 116th ACS deployed to Al Dhafra Air Base in the United Arab Emirates from May to November 2015. The Airmen operated and maintained surveillance, communications and air space management systems to support coalition air operations in and around the Arabian Gulf area of responsibility including, Operations Inherent Resolve (OIR), Resolute Support (ORS), Combined Defense of the Arabian Gulf (CDAG), and Freedom’s Sentinel (OFS). The Airmen worked with joint service and coalition personnel to operate and maintain the world’s largest control and reporting center. Their knowledge and manpower provided a picture of the theater of operations, ensuring the defense of seven Arabian Gulf nations, the safety of 27,000 aircraft across 13 countries, and enabling the disruption of enemy forces throughout the region. The 116th ACS has been very active in providing aerospace control overseas, having previously deployed to Afghanistan in 2006 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom; Iraq in 2008 in support of the Global War on Terror; and to Qatar in 2011 for Air Defense of the Arabian Gulf. 116th Air Control Squadron Factsheet: http://www.142fw.ang.af.mil/resources/factsheets/factsheet_print.asp?fsID=20774&page=1


 Bird.Black.Envelope

8. Links

Beyond The Oregon Myth Visiting Sherman County

City of Moro | Local Government, Meeting Minutes, Emergency Services & More

http://www.cityofmoro.net/ 

Harney County School Officials Announce Resignations

Harney County school officials submit resignation letters

 

There’s a good reason Americans are Horrible at Science

http://qz.com/588126/theres-a-good-reason-americans-are-horrible-at-science/

 How Ceramic Tile is Made

http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-improvement/construction/materials/how-is-ceramic-tile-made.htm

 David Stockman’s Contra Corner | The Astonishing Gift Of The Money Printers—–The World’s Richest 1% Now Have More Wealth Than The Rest Of Humanity

http://davidstockmanscontracorner.com/the-astonishing-gift-of-the-money-printers-the-worlds-richest-1-now-have-more-wealth-than-the-rest-of-humanity/?utm_source=ReviveOldPost&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=ReviveOldPost

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