Sherman County eNews #12

Table of Contents

  1. Oregon Air National Guard’s F-15 Night Training Missions
  2. Oregon Ag in the Classroom
  3. Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries Offers Project Grants
  4. Grants Available for Oregon Museum Projects
  5. Grants Available for Historic Properties & Archaeology Projects
  6. Links

 1. Oregon Air National Guard’s F-15 Night Training Missions

PORTLAND, Oregon – The Oregon Air National Guard’s 142nd Fighter Wing will conduct routine F-15 night training missions, January 12-14, 2016. The night training allows the Citizen-Airmen pilots based at the Portland Air National Guard Base to stay current with mandatory Air Force requirements. Night flying is conducted almost monthly as it provides essential training for nighttime maneuvers. Training flights will be completed each evening before 10:30 p.m. About the 142nd Fighter Wing: The Portland Air National Guard Base employs 1,500 Airmen who provide an economic impact of nearly $500 million to the region. The 142nd Fighter Wing defends our homeland with F-15 Eagle fighter jets, guarding the Pacific Northwest skies from northern California to the Canadian border, on 24-hour Aerospace Control Alert as part of Air Combat Command and the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Their mission is to provide unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community.


2. Oregon Ag in the Classroom

Oregon Ag in the Classroom brought volunteers into 900 Oregon classrooms across 30 Oregon counties as part of its 2015 spring literacy project, and it expects to do more of the same in 2016.

Also, in what Executive Director Jessica Jansen describes as an exciting area of growth, the program has expanded its reach into Portland in recent years.  Ag in the Classroom this year will be participating in the Northwest Agricultural Show.

On Family Day, Wednesday, Jan. 27, Ag in the Classroom, with the help of the Oregon FFA Foundation, will provide hands-on activities for youngsters. The activities are an excellent way to show youngsters the importance of agriculture in their lives, Jansen said.

Oregon Ag in the Classroom continues to reach more students every year, Jansen said. The program has teachers and resources in all 36 counties, she said, but tends to focus on reaching students in urban areas.

“We are more (Willamette) Valley centric, knowing that that is where our target audience is,” Jansen said. “The students that have the least connection with agriculture are in the Willamette Valley region.”

Jansen said the Salem-Keizer School District is the biggest participator in the program, but the Portland School District is catching up.  “That’s been a big area of growth for our program, and one that we are excited about continuing,” she said.

Still, the program continues to reach out to students in rural counties. “That is something that we take a lot of pride in,” Jansen said. “Students that live in rural Oregon and are surrounded by agriculture don’t necessarily have a full understanding of the depth of impact that agriculture has on their daily lives.

“Maybe they are familiar with one aspect of the industry,” Jansen said, “but don’t have the full picture of how everything in their life can be traced back to a farm or ranch.”

Oregon Ag in the Classroom is part of a national program aimed at educating students about agriculture. The nonprofit organization, which is housed at Oregon State University, works with teachers to bring agriculture into everyday curriculum.

One of the organization’s most popular productions each year is its calendar. The calendar includes art about agriculture drawn by students and provides agricultural facts printed in squares depicting the days of the week.

In the program’s annual literacy project, last year 725 volunteers met with students in more than 900 classrooms, connecting with more than 20,000 Oregon students.

Northwest Ag Show is providing Ag in the Classroom booth space for the three days of the show adjacent to the Oregon FFA Foundation.


3. Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries Offers Project Grants

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries is offering grants for qualified historic cemeteries. The annual grants fund projects that preserve historic cemeteries. Projects funded in the past include marker repair workshops, fencing, signs, interpretive panels and brochures, security lighting, access improvements, records management and more.

Awards typically range between $1,000 and $6,000, but have been higher. Anyone can apply for a grant. While the grant applications are online, they are simple and commission staff can provide support.

“Our goal is to preserve Oregon’s historic cemeteries, so we try to make it easy for people to access funds to do that while ensuring the funds are appropriately used,” said historic cemeteries program coordinator Kuri Gill.

A previous grant applicant, Patricia McCracken with Winchester Elementary School, said cemeteries program staff were supportive when she was submitting her grant report. “We were new to filling out grants; staff was extremely helpful when we called,” she said.

There will be grant workshops on project planning and grant writing. A two-hour workshop will be March. 8 in Salem. A one-hour webinar will be available on March 9.

State law established the seven-member historic cemeteries commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. To learn more about the grants or visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


4. Grants Available for Oregon Museum Projects

The Oregon Heritage Commission is offering grants to qualified museums for collections projects, heritage tourism, and education and interpretation projects. Awards typically range between $2,000 and $10,000. Collections projects may include cataloging, archival storage, disaster preparedness and conservation. Heritage tourism projects may include museum marketing and promotions, enhancing visitor experience, and training for museum staff. Education and interpretation projects may include exhibits, online education, school classes, workshops and camps. “This program is a nice opportunity for small and large museums to complete important projects,” said Oregon Heritage Commission coordinator Kyle Jansson. While the grant applications are online, they are simple and there is plenty of support for completing them. “Our goal is to support organizations of all sizes all over the state in their valuable work. We provide assistance in the application process,” says Kuri Gill, the grants program coordinator. The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon’s heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The commission’s mission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon’s heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. To learn more about museum grants, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


5. Grants Available for Historic Properties & Archaeology Projects

The State Historic Preservation Office is offering grants for work on historic properties and for archaeology projects. The annual grants fund up to $20,000 in matching funds for preservation projects. The Preserving Oregon Grants fund preservation of historic buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Work may include non-maintenance preservation like window repair, roof work, foundation projects, and plumbing and electrical needs. It can also fund significant work contributing toward identifying, preserving and interpreting archaeological sites. The Diamonds in the Rough Grants help restore or reconstruct the facades of buildings that have been heavily altered over the years. These grant return buildings to their historic appearance and potentially qualify them for historic register designation (local or national). Preservation office staff is happy to talk with applicants about potential grant projects and review applications. There will be grant workshops on project planning and grant writing. A two-hour workshop will be in Salem on March 8. A one-hour webinar will be available on March 9. To learn more about the grants and workshops visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


6. Links

 Ice Fishing Workshop

http://www.dfw.state.or.us/news/2016/01_jan/010416.asp

The Piper Cub

 

What Your Body Does in a Day

What Your Body Does in a Day…

 The Larger, but Quieter Than Bundy, Push to Take Over Federal Land

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/11/us/the-larger-but-quieter-than-bundy-push-to-take-over-federal-land.html?emc=edit_th_20160111&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=56692698&_r=1

Morning Reads: Today, SCOTUS Will Hear New Attack on Collective Bargaining

BY BILLMOYERS.COM STAFF | JANUARY 11, 2016 http://billmoyers.com/story/morning-reads-today-scotus-will-hear-new-attack-on-collective-bargaining/

 Why Civilizations Really Clash

https://www.stratfor.com/analysis/why-civilizations-really-clash?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Official&utm_campaign=Link

 Farm Bureau, Stallman retires with warning on excessive regulation

http://www.capitalpress.com/Nation_World/Nation/20160111/stallman-retires-with-warning-on-excessive-regulation?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook_Capital_Press

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