Sherman County eNews #282

CONTENTS

  1. Oregon Statewide Broadband Assessment Survey

  2. Oregon State Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

  3. Christmas bows, glitter, ribbon are not recyclable

  4. Finding What You Already Have – The Power of Belief

  5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


People who deal with life generously and large-heartedly go on multiplying relationships to the end. ~Arthur C. Benson.


1. Oregon Statewide Broadband Assessment Survey

pen.markerBusiness Oregon and Oregon’s Broadband Office conducting a statewide broadband assessment survey from November 14 through December 15, 2019, to evaluate the state’s current broadband infrastructure and broadband service availability. While Oregon has made great progress toward getting high-quality broadband for its communities, there is still more to do so that all residents and businesses can get the internet access they need to thrive and succeed. The Broadband Office is developing its plans to make this possible and needs to hear from you! This will help direct public policy regarding Oregon’s digital divide, the need for state funding, and strategies for broadband infrastructure deployment.

We’re asking both households and businesses to help in the assessment by completing a simple questionnaire developed in partnership with our consultants, Strategic Networks Group. The few minutes it takes to complete the online survey can help make future broadband improvements across the state, particularly in rural areas.

The survey can be found here: https://sngroup.com/Oregon-Broadband-Assessment/.


2. Oregon State Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers 

Oregon.Flat.poleCreated: 14 November 2019 | Written by Oregon Capital Insider

Here are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon news stories. 

5,555: State workers who have left SEIU 503 between mid-2018 and Sept. 30, according to state figures. 

1,009: State workers who have left AFSCME Council 75 in that time frame.

4: Democrats in the race for secretary of state. Dark horse candidate Ryan Wruck announced he was dropping out on Sunday. He endorsed State Sen. Mark Hass, D-Beaverton. 

$510,000: Amount the state has agreed to pay to settle a lawsuit brought by the former director of the Oregon Office of Emergency Management, alleging sex discrimination and retaliation for blowing the whistle on misspent funds at the agency. 

62: Oregon veterinarians who sent a letter to Gov. Kate Brown this week demanding an investigation into the killing of a cougar that wandered by a Eugene school in October, according to The Oregonian.

$306: New fee, effective Jan. 1, to register an electric vehicle in Oregon for two years, according to KTVZ. The biennial fee is lower if you’re enrolled in the state’s pay-per-mile road usage program, OReGO.

$152: To register a car with fuel economy of 40 mpg or higher for two years. Cars with lower fuel economy pay even less. 

65-68: Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit, at which the Oregon Historical Society’s vault is kept, according to KOIN. The vault holds everything from the control panels from the Trojan nuclear power plant to the saddle presented to Jackson Sundown, the cowboy who won the bronco-busting contest at the 1916 Pendleton Round-Up. 

149,360: Signatures that supporters of measures to reform the state’s redistricting process need to gather to get any one of the proposals on the November 2020 ballot, according to OPB.

12: Members of a citizens’ commission that would be tasked with the work of drawing new legislative and congressional boundaries under the proposed reforms.


3. Christmas bows, glitter, ribbon are not recyclable.  

Yes, you can recycle Christmas wrapping paper — unless it’s metallic, has glitter or has velvety flocking on it. See more here: https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/news/2017/12/20/dont-recycle-bow-sloppy-christmas-recycling-can-send-all-your-efforts-landfill/963415001/


4. Finding What You Already Have – The Power of Belief

Have you ever thought of “The Wizard of Oz” as a story about the power of beliefs? With the holidays fast approaching, it’s a sure bet that this classic film will be broadcast soon. Perhaps it is time to take a look at the “story beneath the story” of this memorable tale.

You see, Dorothy and her pals all wanted something. As is often the case, they looked for someone else to give it to them, someone in authority who had “the power.” They teamed up because they figured their efficacy was greater together than it was separately, and they were right. They were a real team with a common vision and not just a collection of separate individuals. They were able to overcome life-threatening danger to finally come face to face with what they believed to be the all-powerful Wizard.

When they met the Wizard, they discovered several very important things. Perhaps the most important thing they discovered was that each already had whatever it was he or she felt was lacking; it was their personal beliefs that needed changing.

The Lion wasn’t really a coward – he proved that on the journey to Oz – but he believed he was, so most of the time he acted like it. When the Wizard gave him a medal and reminded him of his bravery, he affirmed the truth of a new belief, and that was all it took. Same thing for the Tin Man and the Scarecrow. Dorothy could have gone home any time she wanted, she just didn’t know she needed to ask how. For her, the journey was a risky rite of passage into her own strength and her own heart. Each of them had “the power” all along.

So, you see, “The Wizard of Oz” can be seen as a wonderfully entertaining story about the power of belief and the importance of becoming our own authority. Who is your Wizard of Oz, and do you really need that person to tell you what you already know about yourself, in your heart? ~The Pacific Institute


5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

birdHappyOwlHow Place Names Get Assigned And Changed In Oregon

Oregon Geographic Names Board

Oregon History Wayfinder

Oregon History 101

The HIRE Act would relocate nearly all of the employees of ten executive departments to regions of the country that need the jobs more.

Oregonians are recycling less while generating more waste

Commentary: Stop Calling The Deep State ‘Public Servants’


 

Sherman County eNews #281

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

God Does Not Discriminate

church.family1In Acts chapter 10 Peter, as a Jew who had been chosen by Jesus and blessed to know Him as the Son of God Messiah or Savior and Lord sent by God the Father and then to be chosen by Him as an apostle sent to build and tend to His church, Peter came to realize that God’s blessing was for more than the Jews. Up to this point in the history of the Jews they did not associate with Gentiles or non-Jews and considered them unclean as they ate things that the Jews were forbidden to eat, and they did not live as did the Jews. There were exceptions, but in those exceptions, it was either because of servitude in captivity or someone voluntarily converting to Judaism and observing the traditions of the Jews.

So, when the church began (after the resurrection and ascension of Jesus), the good news or gospel was proclaimed to the Jews. But as persecution increased because of their following Jesus, these early believers were dispersed. In that dispersion the good news of salvation in Jesus spread to the non-Jewish world. It was in this context that a Roman officer who had come to follow the God of the Jews had been praying and in a vision was told to go find Peter because Peter had a message for them. At the same time Peter was having a vision in which he was told that he could eat of all of the animals because what God had made clean, no man was to declare unclean.

Peter went with them back to Cornelius’ home where he was told that he had a message for them. He then realized this his own vision was about more than dietary laws. God was reaching out to all of man. As Peter declared in Acts 10:34-35, he realized that God does not show partiality. “Jesus is Lord of ALL.”

We can learn a lot about the love of God that took men like Peter beyond the social boundaries that had constrained him for so long as we understand that all men are created by God, loved by Him, and are afforded the opportunity to the same relationship with Him.

Joe Burgess
Pastor, Kent Baptist Church


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

eNEWS POLICIES:

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers. 

NEWS RELEASES. Please submit event and information news, meeting notices and calendar dates by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, how & why with contact or source information. As appropriate, follow up with news of event results. Links are welcome. No posters or flyers. Keep it relevant, no longer than 350 words. 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.  We encourage letters to the Editor that focus on ideas and opinions about public issues and events rather than personalities or private matters. We reserve the right to change policies at any time and to reject or edit any Letter to the Editor.

  • Keep it short, no longer than 350 words.
  • Keep it simple with one or two clear points. No attachments.
  • Keep it fresh with no more than one letter per writer per month.
  • Keep it civilized, in good taste and free from libel.
  • Keep it relevant; focus on a local event, previous letter or issues of general concern – not personalities.
  • Letters must be signed, name and town. Anonymous letters will not be posted.
  • Please submit Letters to the Editor by using the Submit News page.

thankYou

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU! The Sherman County Prevention Department would like to recognize the members of the Drug and Alcohol Prevention Coalition.  Thank you for your passion and dedication to the work we do!

Amber DeGrange, Chair

Ashley Danielson

Cindy Brown

Brad Lohrey

Joan Bird

Jennifer Hale

Mike Somnis

Nadja McConville

Shawn Payne

Natasha Sandquist

Mary Ann Wren

North Central Public Health representatives

Mid-Columbia Center for Living, Shira Skybinskyy and Dan Hoffman.

If you are interested in being part of the team, please contact Amy Asher @ 541-565-5036 or aasher@co.sherman.or.us and don’t forget to follow the Prevention Facebook page for factual information and events. https://www.facebook.com/Sherman-County-Alcohol-and-Drug-Prevention-133311610687300/

 JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS: 

SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR Christmas Bazaar and Christmas Tree Sale 10-3:30 Sherman County School on December 7th. 

SHERMAN COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM. Christmas shopping at The Museum Store and Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day displays December 7 10-3. No admission fee. Brand new items just for the Christmas Sale plus all your year-round favorites. 10% Discount for Sherman County Historical Society members. Got a history buff on your list? MUSEUM MEMBERSHIPS MAKE GREAT GIFTS! 

GRASS VALLEY PAVILION. Country Christmas Bazaar 10-2 on December 7th at the Grass Valley Pavilion.

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

sign.helpwanted

EMPLOYMENT:

See Classifieds in The Times-Journal.

INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANT Sherman County School District, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039. Temporary Instructional Assistant for the 2019-20 School Year  | Posting  Sherman County School is seeking a Temporary .94 FTE highly qualified Instructional Assistant candidate with preferred previous experience working in an educational setting. The successful candidate will work under the direct supervision of the school administration to support activities as assigned.  This position will start on or close to November 12.  This is a temporary position for the remainder of the 2019-20 school year. Criminal record check and pre-employment drug screening required. For information and application materials please email or call Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us or 541-565-3500.   Application Method/Materials Required Please submit a letter of interest, application (available from the school district), resume, and letters of recommendation if you are interested in the position to:

Wes Owens, Superintendent, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039

(541) 565-3500 wowens@sherman.k12.or.us

This position will remain open until filled. Sherman County School District is an equal opportunity employer.

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS. Mid-Columbia Bus Company Seeks Bus Drivers. Do you know someone with time to spare, who loves to drive, and help others? Refer them to Mid-Columbia Bus Company! Once the person you refer becomes certified and drives a full route for at least 30 days, we will donate $1000.00 to a school organization of your choice. What we offer: $13.60 an hour; $500 Sign on bonus; Paid training; Flexible schedule; Dental, Vision, Medical Plan; 401 K … And more. Qualifications: Pass a criminal history check; Have a good driving record; Have a valid Oregon driver’s license; Ability to obtain Class B CDL with training Contact Mid-Columbia Bus Company and tell us where to make a donation today: Amberlena Shaffer, Recruiter   | OFFICE: (541) 303-5093Email: amberlena@MidCoBus.com  Website: www.MidCoBus.com

SERVICES:

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE:

KITCHEN AID MIXER. Kitchen Aid Professional Mixer KP2671X  6 Qt 525 watt. includes Burnished Flat Beater, Burnished Dough Hook and Professional Wire Whip. Used 4X asking $200 / best bid. Call 541-442-8572 Nancy 12/27 

DEHYDRATOR, JERKY MAKER. New still in the box never opened, Nesco Dehydrator & Jerky Maker FD-60 with 4 trays. asking $45 / best bid. Call 541-442-8572 Nancy 12/27 

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

FOR RENT OR LEASE:  

ROOMS FOR RENT. 2 rooms for rent at the Just us Inn in Wasco. Completely furnished with internet and cable TV.  Room 7 private entrance private bathroom two bedroom single bed and king size in Main. Use of common areas Kitchen and TV area.  — 1 queen size bedroom with shared bath on second floor. Use of common areas TV room and kitchen. Please contact Ron at 503 – 957 – 6114. 11/29

FREE: 

LOST OR FOUND:

FOUND: WIG. Halloween wig. Location found- Grass Valley. Call or Text Jeanne at 541-714-5740 to identify and claim. 

WANTED:


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

LogoShermanCoSchoolSHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR

https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

cowboyyeehawNOVEMBER

13-16 Tri-State Grain Convention, Spokane

15-17 Young Farmers & Ranchers Leadership Conference, Portland

16 8th Annual Max Nogle Dinner, Auction, Dance 5 Grass Valley Pavilion

17 Antelope Community Harvest Dinner 2-4 Antelope Community Center

19 Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators 12 Portage Grill

19-21 Association of Oregon Counties Annual Conference

20 Sherman County Court 9

21 National Rural Health Day

21 Gilliam County Historical Society Board Meeting 5:45 Condon

21-23 Oregon Cattleman’s Association Convention, Bend

23 Condon’s Fall Festival

23 Moro Community Presbyterian Church Thanksgiving Dinner 5

28 THANKSGIVING DAY

Christmas.TreeDECEMBER

2 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10-12 Sherman County

2 Grass Valley City Council 7

3 Moro City Council 7

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Methodist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

5 North Central Livestock Association, Riverside, Maupin

5-14 National Rodeo Finals, Las Vegas, Nevada

7 Country Christmas Bazaar 10-2 Grass Valley Pavilion

7 Christmas Shopping at The Museum Store 10-3 Moro

7 Christmas Bazaar and Christmas Tree Sale 10-3:30 Sherman Co. School

7-8 Cascade Singers Present “A Parker-Shaw Christmas”

9 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

10 Sherman County Watershed Council Board Meeting 8

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District 8:30

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

10-12 Oregon Farm Bureau Convention, Gleneden Beach

11 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

12 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board 4 White Salmon

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

17 Wasco City Council 7

18 Sherman County Court 9

23-31 Sherman County School Christmas Break

25 CHRISTMAS

31 NEW YEAR’S EVE

clock.793JANUARY

2 Sherman County Fair Board Meeting 7

6 Grass Valley City Council 7

7 Moro City Council 7

8 Rufus City Council 7

8 Sherman Senior Center Advisory 12:30

10 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1


 

Sherman County eNews #280

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Court Special Session, Nov. 15

  2. Goldendale American Legion Post: Turkey Bingo, Nov. 16

  3. WEBINAR: Rural Suicide Prevention in Farm & Ranch Communities, Nov. 19

  4. Mid-Columbia Medical Center Now Offers 3D Mammography

  5. Creating Our ‘A-Game’

  6. Ancestry open archives US military records for free until Nov. 17

  7. Changing Hands: Farm & Ranch Succession Planning Workshop, Dec. 10

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


You’ve touched people and known it. You’ve touched people and never may know it. Either way, you have something to give. It is in giving to one another that each of our lives becomes meaningful. ~Laura Schlessinger.


1.Notice. Sherman County Court Special Session, Nov. 15

SHERMAN COUNTY COURT SPECIAL SESSION

COMMISSIONERS MEETING ROOM

Court Agenda

November 15, 2019

Appointment Schedule

  • 1:45 p.m. Fiber Project – Easements
  • 2:00 p.m.    Sale of County-owned Biggs Property

2. Goldendale American Legion Post: Turkey Bingo, Nov. 16

TURKEY BINGO

turkey

Brought to you by Goldendale American Legion Louis Leidl Post 116

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16TH

TIME: Noon until??

25 cents per card per game

All winners get a “FREE” TURKEY


3. WEBINAR:  Rural Suicide Prevention in Farm & Ranch Communities, Nov. 19

3:30 – 4:45 pm ET, Tuesday, November 19 |  Join the webinar.  https://hrsaseminar.adobeconnect.com/rsp-farm-ranch-communities/
Dial-In: 888-989-7695; Participant Passcode: 6473800

This webinar, hosted by HRSA’s Office of Regional Operations-Denver, is designed for rural providers, organizations, and communities. The purpose of the webinar is to enhance knowledge of stress and suicide in rural areas, with a focus on farm and ranch communities, and to highlight stress/suicide prevention activities. The webinar will feature examples of suicide prevention programs designed to address agricultural stress and suicide from a community-based perspective. Suicide prevention resources will be provided.  No registration is required. For more on National Rural Health Day, November 21, 2019, click .https://www.hrsa.gov/rural-health/about-us/rural-healthday.html


4. Mid-Columbia Medical Center Now Offers 3D Mammography

Thanks to Grant From M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust State-of-the Art Diagnostic Tool Provides Better Breast Cancer Detection at its Early, Most Treatable Stage

(THE DALLES, OR. – Nov. 12, 2019) — Mid-Columbia Health Foundation has received a grant from the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust of Vancouver, Washington, for the purchase of a 3D mammography system, the best diagnostic tool available to detect breast cancer. Mid-Columbia Medical Center (MCMC) is the only breast center of excellence in the Columbia River Gorge.

Known as digital breast tomosynthesis, or DBT, this new system now available at MCMC takes images from several different angles to create a three-dimensional picture of the breast. With this technology, radiologists and physicians can better detect possible abnormalities in the breast at an early stage when they’re easier to treat.

“Mammography remains one of the best tools available for detection of breast abnormalities and we have come a long way in what technology can now do for us,” said MCMC Chief Medical Officer Serene Perkins, M.D. “We are grateful for the Murdock Trust’s support and commitment to making sure that we are able to provide the very best breast cancer screening options to women in our community.”

With 3D mammography, the images taken are converted into a stack of very thin layers, or “slices,” allowing a radiologist to evaluate the breast layer by layer. This greater accuracy means better breast cancer detection and a reduced chance of being called back for additional testing. A number of studies have found that 3D mammograms increase detection of invasive breast cancer by 30-40% compared to traditional mammography, while also reducing the number of false positives.

On average, a 3D mammography examination lasts for a few minutes unless additional views or exams are required. After the exam, the images are read by a MCMC radiologist who provides results to the patients and referring physicians. If an abnormality is detected, other examinations will be necessary to get the information needed for an accurate diagnosis. Such exams could involve ultrasound, MRI and/or a breast tissue biopsy.

One in eight women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Mammography is designed to provide early detection of breast cancer and is an important part of routine healthcare. Yearly mammograms are recommended starting at age 40 and continuing for as long as a woman is in good health. For further information or to schedule a mammogram, call MCMC at 541-298-4000.

The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust (murdocktrust.org), created by the will of the late Melvin J. (Jack) Murdock, provides grants to organizations in five states of the Pacific Northwest—Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington—that seek to strengthen the region’s educational and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. The Trust’s history of supporting Mid-Columbia Health Foundation dates back to 2008 when MCMC was awarded $250,000 to bring its diagnostics department from a film to digital base. The Trust stepped up again in 2015 with a grant of $130,000 to help fund MCMC’s Breast Health for Strong Families program.

“I am incredibly grateful for our relationship with the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust,” said Celeste Hill-Thomas, Executive Director of Outreach, Communication and Foundation at MCMC. “Having their support over the years has allowed us to elevate the level of care provided in our service area. 3D Mammography is not something you find at every rural hospital.”

Founded in 1901 and located in The Dalles, Mid-Columbia Medical Center is a nationally recognized hospital dedicated to serving residents of The Dalles and its surrounding communities. In 1992 MCMC became the first hospital in the nation to integrate the Planetree philosophy of patient care, which emphasizes the need to address a person’s intellectual, environmental, emotional and spiritual concerns in addition to their physical needs. As a Planetree hospital, MCMC works to provide a caring, nurturing and educational environment; puts great efforts into humanizing and demystifying the medical experience; and strives to empower people to become active partners in their own healthcare. For more information visit mcmc.net.


5. Creating Our ‘A-Game’

If you are interested in pursuing personal growth, does this necessarily mean you are a selfish person? Not necessarily, but personal change does have effects beyond ourselves. Today, let’s look at how personal growth affects relationships.

There is no question about it. We need to have a caring relationship with ourselves before we can expect others to do so. Showing that we have respect for ourselves tends to drive others to provide us with their respect for us, in return – provided that we earn that respect.

Being interested in personal growth doesn’t mean you’re selfish. In fact, it’s quite the contrary. In his book, “The Psychology of Romantic Love,” Nathaniel Brandon wrote, “The first affair we must consummate successfully is the love affair with ourselves. Only then are we ready for other love relationships.” In other words, if we don’t even like ourselves, it’s going to be difficult to love others.

Human beings are social beings, and we live – one way or another – in community with other human beings. When we work toward the betterment of something, in community with others, then it’s important to bring our own “A-game” to the party. And that almost demands we love and respect ourselves first.

You see, no matter how concerned we are about others, we are ultimately responsible only for ourselves. If we feel inadequate and victimized, then we have no power to offer another person security and strength. Without that firm personal foundation, we are building our relationships on what amounts to quicksand.

Self-development means being the best you can be and giving the best that you can give. It means asking yourself, “If I were living with me, would I want to stay around?” Yes, that’s a big question, and one that demands an answer. Then, you change what you need to change according to that answer you have given yourself. And you don’t need to make a big deal about it.

You see, although there are tremendous personal benefits to self-development, it is, perhaps, in your relationships with others that a commitment to personal growth will bring you the most gratifying changes – and a deeper sense of happiness and contentment. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Ancestry open archives US military records for free until Nov. 17

military.navyIn honor of Veterans Day, Ancestry is opening their archive of US military records to the public for free until November 17 at 11:59PM EST. Visit www.ancestry.com/honor<https://458rl1jp.r.us-east-1.awstrack.me/L0/https:%2F%2Faaslh.site-ym.com%2Flink.asp%3Fe=katie.henry@oregon.gov%26job=3936597%26ymlink=532647107%26finalurl=http%253A%252F%252Fwww%252Eancestry%252Ecom%252Fhonor/1/0100016e65ac76ac-dacb200f-afd3-4535-8678-dd2c3b2471fe-000000/-2RPY1NfAPNeIGraSPWVKhnwdCY=135> to explore.


7. Changing Hands: Farm & Ranch Succession Planning Workshop, Dec. 10

Farmers, ranchers, and foresters are invited to a free farm and ranch succession planning workshop on Dec. 10 as part of the Oregon Farm Bureau Convention at the Salishan Resort in Gleneden Beach.

It’s never too early or late to begin planning for the future of your farm or ranch. With proper planning, you can provide for the future harmony of your family and viability of your farm business. Whether you have heirs or a business successor yet or not, this workshop will give you the legal, financial, and interpersonal tools you need to take the next step in succession planning.

This is a fantastic opportunity for farmers, ranchers, and foresters to learn from the state’s leading experts in the field:

  • Maria Schidlkofer, Attorney at Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt PC
  • Diana Tourney, Accountant and Farm Succession Coordinator at Clackamas Small Business Development Center
  • Mark Wickman, Founder and Counselor at Family Business Counsel
  • Nellie McAdams, Staff at Oregon Agricultural Trust

The event will take place as part of the 2019 Oregon Farm Bureau Convention.

When: Tuesday, December 10, 2019.

Workshop from 1:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Happy Hour from 4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. at the Salishan Lounge for farmers of all generations thinking about non-family succession and business partnerships.

Where: Salishan Lodge 7760 North Highway 101, Gleneden Beach

Who: All are welcome. Please RSVP!

RSVP to Nellie McAdams, nellie@oregonagtrust.org, 971.409.6806


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do 

Bird.Black.EnvelopeJust Security: Public Document Clearing House – Ukraine Impeachment Inquiry

Oregon’s Most Endangered Places 2020 

Space Weather: Starlink Satellites


 

Sherman County eNews #279

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Public/School Library Board Meeting, Nov. 12

  2. 4-H Open House & Enrollment Night at the Fairgrounds, Nov. 13

  3. Sherman County Prevention Thanks Drug and Alcohol Prevention Coalition

  4. Single Vehicle Versus Pedestrian Fatal Crash on I-84 in Sherman County

  5. Fundraising Basics

  6. The Importance of Is-ness

  7. Congressman Walden: Veterans Day and Veterans

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


No matter where we are, we need those friends who trudge across from their neighborhoods to ours. ~Stephen Peters


1. Notice. Sherman County Public/School Library Board Meeting, Nov. 12

Public Notice of Board Meeting: The Sherman County Public/School Library will be holding a Board Meeting on Tuesday, November 12 at 5:30 pm.


2. 4-H Open House & Enrollment Night at the Fairgrounds, Nov. 13

4-H clover1Families, looking forward to seeing you Wednesday, November 13 6pm for a 4-H Open House & Enrollment Night at the Sherman Fairgrounds. A light dinner will be served, as kids and families can meet 4-H club leaders and get their enrollment forms done and pay the $30 fee. Regular 4-H is for youth aged 9-19 as of September 1, 2019.  Clubs include beef, sheep, swine, goat, poultry, horse, small animals, cooking, outdoor cooking/food preservation, photography, sewing, theatre arts, hiking/biking, shooting sports, leadership/camp counseling, and Cloverbuds for youth aged 5-8. Get started with forms here, scroll down the page for Youth Enrollment Packet, fill out and return to Sherman Extension office: https://extension.oregonstate.edu/4h/sherman/get-involved


3. Sherman County Prevention Thanks Drug and Alcohol Prevention Coalition

The Sherman County Prevention Department would like to recognize the members of the Drug and Alcohol Prevention Coalition.  Thank you for your passion and dedication to the work we do!

Amber DeGrange; Chair

Ashley Danielson

Cindy Brown

Brad Lohrey

Joan Bird

Jennifer Hale

Mike Somnis

Nadja McConville

Shawn Payne

Natasha Sandquist

Mary Ann Wren

North Central Public Health representatives

Mid-Columbia Center for Living, Shira Skybinskyy and Dan Hoffman

If you are interested in being part of the team, please contact Amy Asher @ 541-565-5036 or aasher@co.sherman.or.us and don’t forget to follow the Prevention Facebook page for factual information and events. https://www.facebook.com/Sherman-County-Alcohol-and-Drug-Prevention-133311610687300/


4. Single Vehicle Versus Pedestrian Fatal Crash on I-84 in Sherman County

On Monday, November 11, 2019 at approximately 5:45 pm, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash involving a pedestiran on I-84 near MP 104.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a red and white 2016 Peterbilt Commerical Motor Vehicle, operated by Keith Allen Hille, age 31, of Moscow Mills, Missouri, was traveling westbound on I-84 in the slow lane, when he noticed a reflective vest moving around in the lane of travel. He initially thought the vest was blowing around then realized the vest was being worn by a pedestrian, identified as Alejandro Lozano Rivas, age 33, of Biggs Junction, Oregon. Hille swerved to avoid Lozano Rivas, but was unable to avoid striking him. Lozano Rivas suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. Hille stopped immediately after the collison and is cooperating with the investigation.

OSP was assisted by the Sherman County Sheriff’s Office, the Sherman County District Attorney’s Office and ODOT.


5. Fundraising Basics

dollars.coinsAll good fund raising plans have one thing in common: they show a diverse number of sources for their income. The board of directors plays a crucial role in the selection, implementation and evaluation of fundraising strategies. Board members may individually commit to raising and giving a certain amount of money. The basic premise of fundraising – You must ask, you must give. Everything after that involves creativity, imagination and a sense of fun.

Here are the three most important things to know about fundraising right up front:

  1. People give when they are asked, and rarely give when they are not. Even when people are asked, they don’t always give. So, you need to ask for more gifts than the number you need to bring in, and you need to be comfortable with people saying “No.”
  2. Donors are not ATMs. You need to thank them and keep them posted on what your organization is doing with their money if you want them to give more than once.
  3. You can’t raise all the money your group needs by yourself. Spend some time building a team of people to help you.

If you don’t have time to thank donors, you don’t have time to have donors.

~ https://www.grassrootsfundraising.org/howto/index.html


6. The Importance of Is-ness

Have you ever heard of the concept of “is-ness?” “Is-ness” is not a term that you are likely to see in a textbook. (There are a bunch of references if you Google “Is-ness”.) However, it is an idea that has a profound effect on who we are and how we behave. Let’s look at some examples.

A person who believes that he or she “is” an optimist will naturally tend to look on the bright side as a day-in, day-out experience. But someone who simply feels optimistic right now may be very well feel pessimistic tomorrow. You see, an optimist “is” not who they are. It just happens to be something they are passing through today.

A person who believes he or she “is” a drug addict will tend to behave like an addict no matter what, and recovery may be very difficult. On the other hand, someone who thinks that they have developed a dependency on drugs doesn’t have to alter their most central self-image in order to kick the habit. This difference in framing may seem slight on the surface, but it goes to the very core of the mindset shift that allows successful recovery to happen.

We all behave in ways that are consistent with the person we believe ourselves to be. That is “is-ness” in a nutshell. So, you can see why it is important to know what you believe about yourself. Yes, that will involve a little introspection. Most of us devote little time to honest introspection, because, let’s face it, there are so many more fun things to do. However, introspection nearly always leads to insights, and insights are the initial stepping-stones to becoming “more” than we were yesterday.

If there are things you’d like to change, first change how you think and talk about them. Instead of saying, “I am in financial trouble,” say, “I have some debts right now, but I am taking action to resolve them.” Replace “I am a cancer victim,” with “I’ve developed cancer, but I am basically healthy and strong. I have the strength to fight this.”

Get the idea? Your actions will follow your thoughts and words – but the beliefs, those thoughts and words, need to come first. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Congressman Walden: Veterans Day and Veterans

American flag2The men and women who have selflessly served our great nation deserve the utmost support and respect. While every Veterans Day we pay special respect and honor to our nation’s finest by visiting gravesites, attending memorial services, and participating in parades, let us also remember that veterans deserve the best every day. That is why one of my top priorities in Congress is ensuring our veterans receive the service and support they earned every day.

This year, we have done a lot for our veterans. First, Congress passed the biggest budget in history for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), particularly when it comes to health care. That includes $8.6 billion for mental health care services, $400 million for opioid abuse prevention, $206 million for suicide prevention outreach, and $270 million specifically for rural veterans’ health initiatives. A strong VA budget is especially important with the launch of the VA MISSION Act.

The VA MISSION Act, which I cosponsored, was signed into law by President Trump last year. This past June, the community care program, an aspect of the law, launched. This gives veterans increased access to timely, quality care by allowing them to seek care in the community and by establishing a more permanent network of doctors to partner with VA and see veterans close to where they live. The community care program is essential for veterans living in rural areas, like much of our district, because the nearest VA may be hours away.

Another huge win our veterans received this year came when the Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act of 2019 was signed into law. This law ensures that Vietnam Navy veterans who served in the offshore waters of Vietnam receive the presumption of exposure to Agent Orange, a toxic chemical used during the Vietnam era. Many veterans exposed to the chemical found that it resulted in medical issues such as colon cancer.

In addition to providing necessary compensation to our veterans, the Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act included a provision I coauthored that ensures veterans in rural Oregon no longer face needless delays when seeking to buy a home using the benefits they earned through their service. I have heard several horror stories from veterans about delays getting an appraisal for their VA-backed loan. Some waited up to nine weeks to even have an appraiser assigned to their case, making them far less competitive as prospective buyers in the housing market — one veteran even lost his prospective home when his interest rate lock expired as he waited for an appraisal. That’s unacceptable. Now, veterans living in rural America will get a fair chance to have their appraisals completed in a timely manner.

In June, we celebrated the 75th anniversary of the GI Bill, which has allowed our nation’s veterans and their families to return home to pursue further education. I worked to help improve this benefit by supporting the passage of the Forever GI Bill, which made the benefits last a lifetime.

While we have already achieved a significant amount for our veterans this year, we still have much more ahead of us. I will continue to work to improve the benefits and services that veterans receive and help veterans in my district with any issues they may face with VA. If you are a veteran in the 2nd District of Oregon, and you’re having problems with VA, please give my office a call at 800-533-3303. My team and I are ready to assist you with problems you are having with VA. We will do everything in our power to get results for you.

God bless all our veterans and their families, and thank you for your service.

It is an honor to represent you in the U.S. Congress.

Best regards,

Greg Walden

U.S. Representative

Oregon’s Second District


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbStudy finds ‘porch pirates’ active in Oregon

Video. Just a Common Soldier

PSU study finds microplastics in majority of razor clams and oysters collected on Oregon coast

Oregon public employee unions see decline in dues-paying members

WATCH YOUR LANGUAGE. Possessives Stump a Lot of Writers


 

Sherman County eNews #278

CONTENTS

  1. Fall Grant Awards Announced by Sherman County Cultural Coalition

  2. Reminder: Sherman Development League Grant Applications Due November 15th

  3. Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators, Nov. 19

  4. Anita Augusta (Dunlap) Barnett Hooper 1921-2019

  5. Sherman County: For The Record Stories & Records by Local Authors 1983-2015

  6. Banning Self Judgment

  7. A Positive Mind


If I can count on you, and you can count on me, just think what a wonderful world this will be. ~Childhood rhyme.


1. Fall Grant Awards Announced by Sherman County Cultural Coalition

Fall grant awards for 2019 have been announced by the Sherman County Cultural Coalition (SCCC) committing $7,140.00 to projects that strengthen existing cultural resources or engage the community in the arts, heritage or humanities in Sherman County.

Eight project applications met the goals and priorities established by the Coalition in the Sherman County Cultural Plan. Successful applicants and projects are as follows: City of Grass Valley – Annual Easter Egg Hunt; Grass Valley First Baptist Church – Spring Fling; Grass Valley Pavilion Restoration Committee – Annual Max Nogle Dinner/Dance/Auction; Sherman County 4-H Basic Sewing Club – Program Supplies; Sherman County Parent Teacher Organization – Sherman Free Little Libraries; Sherman County Photography Club – Library Photography Display; Sherman SKORE Cheerleading Program – Uniforms, Supplies & Camp; Wasco School Events Center – Auditorium Finishing Details.

Funding for these community projects was made possible with a grant award received from the Oregon Cultural Trust plus matching funds generously provided by Sherman County. Applications for the next grant cycle will be available in the spring of 2020.

For additional information on the Sherman County Cultural Coalition, please visit our website at https://www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com.


2. Reminder: Sherman Development League Grant Applications Due November 15th

Applications are available for 2019 Sherman Development League (SDL) grants. Grants can be applied for by 501(c)(3) and other non-profit organizations. Organizations that have received a grant from SDL are not eligible to apply until their current grant requirements have been met. Revolving loan funds are also available to for-profit entities and businesses.

Applications will be accepted until November 15, 2019, and grants will be awarded by February 1, 2020.

To receive appropriate grant/loan application forms, please submit a letter of request which includes:

• A brief description of your project.
• State if the project is a capital expenditure, one-time program or pilot project, emergency assistance or a loan request.
• Identify the type of organization requesting funding.

Mail or email requests to:
Sherman Development League, Inc.
P.O. Box 11
Moro, OR 97039
shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com


3. Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators, Nov. 19

Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators, will meet at noon, Tuesday the 19th, at the Portage Grill in the Shilo Inn, The Dalles. The program will be presented by Stacey Shaw, Administrator of the High School Charter School, Wahtonka Campus.

All interested persons in education from Sherman, Wasco & Hood River Counties are invited to attend.  If not on a “telephone tree”, make your luncheon reservation by calling either 541-386-1516 or 541-478-3429.


4. Anita Augusta (Dunlap) Barnett Hooper 1921-2019

flower.rose.starAnita Augusta Hooper was the youngest of five children of Arnold Alan and Mary Dorothy (Haynes) Dunlap.  Born July 14, 1921, she died at age 98 in The Dalles on November 5, 2019.  Raised in Kent and Grass Valley in Sherman County, she was an outdoor kid who especially loved Camp Sherman and the Metolius River.

The Dunlaps moved to Grass Valley after her father’s general store in Kent burned.  He was the manager of the Grass Valley Grain Growers for many years, a position Anita later held.  During her tenure of about 10 years, the concrete elevators in Grass Valley and Kent were built and put into service.

She was married to Kenneth Barnett, until his death aboard a U.S. Navy ship in World War II. She then joined the Waves, an acronym for Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service in the U.S. Navy.  While assigned to Camp Adair near Corvallis, Oregon to help returning veterans recover, she met Harry Herschel Hooper.

Harry was another Navy man, but suffered in a Japanese prison camp for over three and a half years after his ship, the USS Pope (DD-225), was sunk in the Battle of the Java Sea. They were married in 1946, and moved to The Dalles, Harry’s hometown, where Harry worked in the Sunshine Mill.  In 1949, Harry’s name was drawn as the winner of farm property near Hazelton, Idaho.  They developed and farmed that property for several years, and then moved to Grass Valley, where they purchased the motel and Union 76 service station.

While in Grass Valley and on October 13, 1952, their son Floyd Arnold Hooper was born.  Floyd recently retired from the Oregon Department of Transportation and lives with his partner Terri Haag at Pine Hollow, Oregon.

Harry had suffered permanent injuries during his internment, making it difficult to sustain the kind of work the service station required.  They sold the motel and station and then operated a feed lot near Tygh Valley, and then leased some farm land on Juniper Flat.  While there, Anita led an effort to create a rural fire protection district, and became its first fire chief.

After several successful years farming, they bought a place on Hood Canal in Washington and divided their time between that home and a place in Yuma, Arizona.

Anita loved to water ski, slalom style, but when she turned 80, Harry decided it was time for them to quit, and sold the boat.  They eventually decided to also slow down on travel, and bought a home in The Dalles.  After one of their morning card games following breakfast, Harry dozed off in his chair and did not awaken.  Anita lost her partner of 65 years on October 10, 2011.

Anita continued her independent ways, despite macular degeneration and hearing impairment.  She was still able to play cards, and had good friends who provided transportation.  Her only medication was an occasional aspirin, and she continued to live independently at her home in The Dalles until about three months ago, when she moved to Flagstone Senior Living in The Dalles.

A memorial event with music and tributes provided by the Mobley family is scheduled for 2 p.m. on Sunday, November 24, 2019 at the Pavilion in Grass Valley, Oregon.  Contributions to the Grass Valley Pavilion in memory of Anita are encouraged.


5. Sherman County: For The Record 1983-2015: Stories for Veterans Day

American flag2In Remembrance and Appreciation on Veterans’ Day

 

 

Volume & Number

#1-2, 1983

WW I Cochran Diary, Excerpts by Frank von Borstel

Autobiography of Giles French by Giles L. French [several parts]

#7-1, 1989

Camp Rufus, WWII by Sherry Kaseberg

#9-2, 1991

Camp Rufus, Army Legend

#10-1, 1992

Letter: Loy Cochran on the Rhine, WWI

#11-1, Spring 1993

WW II Military Experiences by Paul A. Fraser

#11-2 Fall 1993

Tsubota Family, Japan & Oregon by Isami Tsubota

World War II Memories by Lloyd Henrichs

#12-1, 1994

WWII Military Experiences by Malcolm McDermid

#12-2, 1994

WWII Air Force Experiences by Bob Boynton

#13-1, 1995

WWII Army Experiences by Glenn Virtue

WWII Seabees Experiences by Stuart Macnab

WWII Navy Experiences by Byron O. “Swede” Stark

WWII Navy Experiences by Clarence A. Young

#13-2, 1995

WWII Pacific Experiences by Tom Macnab & Helen Kelly Macnab

WW II Home Front Memories by Nell Coats Melzer

WWII Home Front Memories by Dorothy Brown Benson

WWII Letters: Don & Jacque von Borstel

WWII Navy Nurse Corps by Owietus Neal McDermid

#14-1, 1996

WWII Navy Adventures by Dan Kaseberg

WWII Navy Life of Marcus & Eilene Eslinger

WWII Leyte and Back by Chet Coats

WWII Letters Frank Sayrs by Mary von Borstel Sayrs

#14-2, 1996

Thomas Fraser, USAF by Thomas H. Fraser

WWII Air Force by Howard Conlee

#15-1, 1997

WW II, Africa & Europe by Phil O’Meara

#15-2, 1997

WWII William G. Macnab’s B-17 Collision Over the North Sea by Teresa K. Flatley

#18-1, 2000

Charlie Wilson, French Legion of Honor by Mark Fields

WWII Gordon O. Fraser by Richard Fraser

#19-1, 2001

Civil War Veterans in Sherman County by Sherry Kaseberg

History of Frank E. Brown Post No. 91, American Legion

WWI Draft Registration List, 1917

#22-1, 2004

Red Cross Auxiliaries, Part One by Chris Sanders

#22-2, 2004

Red Cross Auxiliaries, Part Two by Chris Sanders

#25-2 2007

WW II Stories: Conlee, Boynton, O’Meara, Fraser, Morrow, McCoy, von Borstel, Kaseberg, McClure, Macnab

WW II B-17 Collision by Teresa Flatley

#29-1 2011

Dewey Thomas’ WWII Military Reflections – Part One by Dewey Thomas with Reine Thomas

WWII Navy Experiences by Charles F. Decker

#29-2 2011

Dewey Thomas’ WWII Military Reflections – Part Two by Dewey Thomas with Reine Thomas

#30-1 2012

Navy Experiences, Memories of Easter 1966 by Doug Rhinehart

Rev. Roy Harvey and Captain Joe Harvey by Joe Harvey

#30-2 2012

WWII Merchant Marine Experiences of Ted Carlson by Susan R. Smith

#31-1  2013

Lt. Commander Gordon D. Helyer, U. S. Navy by Pat (Goodwin) Helyer

#31-2  2013

World War II Veterans Historic Highway by Dick Tobiason

#33-2   2015

Fort Lewis, New Guinea, Philippines & Japan by Robert Ziegler


6. Banning Self Judgment

There is no better way to assure an ample supply of pain in your life than the destructive habit of self-blame. It damages the self-image, all while it makes a sense of positive mental and emotional well-being near impossible.

Unreasonable expectations and self-blame can make our lives miserable. For example, how often do you hear yourself say something like, “I left the car lights on. How could I be so stupid?” Or, “I really put my foot in it that time. I guess I’ll never learn.” The brain immediately associates car lights left on with stupid, and an inability to learn to keep one’s own counsel rather than saying something untoward or awkward in social situations.

Sound familiar? Self-blaming statements like these are commonplace for far too many of us. Now, there is nothing the matter with the first part of these statements. They are just simple facts. But it is the second part, the judgmental blast, that keeps us feeling miserable and does the real damage.

What if we get rid of the judgments and substitute something more positive? For example, “I left the car lights on. What an inconvenience! The next time I’ll be more careful.” Or, “I really put my foot in it this time. That is not like me. Next time, I will handle it another way,” and then you go on to define that other, more constructive, way.

Do you see the difference? You are acknowledging that your behavior could stand changing, but you are also recognizing your competence and stating a clear intention for the future. Even better, you should be creating a new “picture” of what you will do “the next time.” It’s the negative picture we want to change, and that’s not really possible if we continue to kick ourselves every time we make a correctable mistake.

So, instead of judging, why not allow yourself to make mistakes without making a big deal over it. Then, give yourself a positive goal to shoot for. Your self-esteem will rise, your effectiveness rises right along with it, and your self-image gets the boost it needs to enhance your well-being.

Try it. You’ll like the results. ~The Pacific Institute


7. A Positive Mind

A positive mind finds a way it can be done. A negative mind looks for all the ways it can’t be done. Someone once said, “There are no truths; there are only perceptions of truth.” Whether or not you accept this statement, whatever you believe to be true will become your reality. Your subconscious mind will believe anything you tell it — if you repeat the words often and with conviction. When you are faced with a daunting task that you’ve never attempted before, focus on the potential for success, not on the possibilities for failure. Break the job down into smaller elements and tackle each one separately. The only difference between success and failure in any job is your attitude toward it. ~The Napoleon Hill Foundation


 

Sherman County eNews #277

CONTENTS

  1. Oregon Wheat Commission & Oregon Wheat Growers League, Nov. 11

  2. Book Signing Dinner Discussion with Peter Marbach, Nov. 22

  3. Sherman County Fair’s Christmas Bazaar and Christmas Tree Sale, Dec 7

  4. Sherman County Court Notes, Nov. 6

  5. Sherman County Court News, Oct. 16

  6. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

  7. Genealogists! One Week Free Access, New England Genealogical Society Records

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


There are those whose lives affect all others around them, quietly touching one heart, who in turn, touches another, reaching out to ends further than they would ever know. ~William Bradfield


1. Notice. Oregon Wheat Commission & Oregon Wheat Growers League, Nov. 11

NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING BY CONFERENCE CALL

Oregon Wheat Commission and Oregon Wheat Growers League

November 11, 2019, 8:00 a.m.

Oregon Wheat Commission Conference Room

1200 NW Naito Parkway, Suite 370, Portland, Oregon 97209

AGENDA

Consider the Selection Committee’s candidate recommendation for the Oregon Wheat Industry CEO position.

Please call or e-mail the OWC office for call in information.

The meeting is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities, please contact the Oregon Wheat Commission office forty-eight (48) hours in advance at (503) 467-2161.


2. Book Signing Dinner Discussion with Peter Marbach, Nov. 22 

Accomplished photographer and author Peter Marbach is hosting a discussion and book signing of his newest book Healing the Big River: Salmon Dreams and the Columbia River Treaty on Friday, November 22 at 6 p.m. at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center & Museum. The book combines Marbach’s award-winning landscape photography with compelling essays from individuals concerned about the Columbia River and its future. Dinner will be offered for $18 before the program at 6 p.m. The program without dinner costs $5 and begins at 7 p.m.

If you have any questions, please reach out!

Mikey Goyette, Marketing Manager, Columbia Gorge Discovery Center & Museum, 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles, OR 97058 | 541-296-8600, ext. 215  www.gorgediscovery.org


3. Sherman County Fair’s Christmas Bazaar and Christmas Tree Sale, Dec 7

Sherman County Fair’s Holiday Bazaar

and

Christmas Tree Sale

Saturday, December 7 – 10-3:30

Christmas.tree.star

Sherman County School Cafeteria

Moro, Oregon

Questions? Contact Kya at kya@shermanctyfair.com.


4. Sherman County Court Notes, Nov. 6

By Temporary Administrative Assistant Kristi Brown

*NOTE:

– This is a very brief outline ONLY of topics considered “public interest”.

– These are NOT OFFICIAL MINUTES. For official minutes and full details, please see the approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us after the next Court session. Thank you. 

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on November 6, 2019, and in conducting the business of the County,

  • heard Merrie von Borstel, Biggs Service District, provide an update on the USDA funding application for the Biggs Water Project;
  • heard Aaron Cook, City of Rufus Administrator, request Downtown Improvement Funds to improve the City of Rufus City Hall;
  • heard Sol Jacobsen discuss County owned property;
  • approved a Rental Development Grant application for Roger Whitley;
  • approved the Oregon Military Department Office of Emergency Management, Emergency Management Performance Grant No. 19-528; and
  • declared Tuesday, December 24, 2019, and Tuesday, December 31, 2019, as Courthouse Holidays.

5. Sherman County Court News, Oct. 16

ShermanCoLogoBy Kristi Brown, Temporary Administrative Assistant

Quarterly Reports, Sherman Extension Ag Agent Status – Tri-Co Hazardous Waste & Recycling Program, and Executive Session in Accordance with ORS 192.660 (2)(i) Personnel, were the main topics on the agenda during the October 16th session of Sherman County Court in Moro.

Nate Stice, Regional Solutions, presented his quarterly report. He introduced Matthew Mattia, Business Oregon Region Project Manager, who accompanied him to meet the Court. Mattia works with many Counties in the Northern and Central region, and works close with Stice as well. Stice had been working on Building Codes and permitting for the hemp facility, Evergreen State Holding, LLC, in Grass Valley. Currently they are on a good path, however, the change of occupancy has been held up. Certain inspections and plans were needed, but was hopeful things would start moving along in the next few weeks. Regarding infrastructure, Grass Valley was in the process of writing the Request for Proposal for their Waste Water Project; Stice will keep checking in for technical assistance. He reminded the Court that the Obtainable Housing Revolving Loan Fund was available through Mid-Columbia Economic Development District, which provided slightly below market interest rates. There had been two applications submitted for the fund, from Hood River and Wasco counties, and Stice would like to see one submitted from Sherman County.

Wade McLeod, District Attorney, presented a quarterly report, stating crimes were still happening, and cases were moving forward. Regarding changes in his Department, there has been constant change in the law, and grand jury now has to be recorded as of July 1, 2019; recordings have been successful. Legislative changes always affect the Department. Brief discussion held on mental health and legislature.

Bryce Coelsch, Fair Board Chair, presented a quarterly report. He stated fair 2019 was successful, with an increase of support from the Community. There were around 200-250 people in attendance at the kick off BBQ; an increase from last year. The plan for Fair 2020, would be to change up the events, and move away from the bull riding. However, they do want to stay with a western type event for one of the nights. The attendance for the bull riding event went down; while the demolition derby and dance attendance increased. Coelsch reported there has been no negative feedback regarding the new building plan, and he would attend a meeting the following week to find out the updated cost estimates. The latest estimate was four million dollars; the Board had already reduced the size and scope of the building to keep costs down. Brief discussion held on appreciation dinner held every year.

Jacob Powell, Oregon State University (OSU) Extension, introduced himself as the new Sherman and Wasco County Extension Agriculture (Ag) Agent. He reported he was on his third week of work, and split his time between Sherman and Wasco Counties; Sherman provided 75% of the funding, while Wasco provided 25%. He will make himself available to landowners as much as possible, and hold a flexible schedule based on where he would be needed, with his main office being located in Sherman. Powell will conduct a needs assessment to know what the priority needs are; landowners can expect to see anonymous surveys.

Cindy Brown, OSU Extension, reported her position was almost 100% 4-H, healthy living, and nutrition based through OSU, with only a few hours designated to the County. She requested Powell be appointed to the Tri-County Hazardous Waste Committee to replace her as the Sherman County representative. The Tri County Hazardous Waste and Recycling Program consists of nine entities: Sherman, Wasco, and Hood River counties, and the cities of The Dalles, Dufur, Maupin, Hood River, Mosier and Cascade Locks, with each providing a representative to the Committee, and the goal was to serve more customers and households with proper waste disposal. The Department of Environmental Quality has big emphasis on recycling; in the last 10 years the focus switched from separated recycling to comingle, which increased the volume being recycled. Co-mingle recycling was shipped to China for many years, however two years ago, China refused all shipments due to shipments containing garbage; some cities are trying to continue with separated recycling due to this situation. The Dalles still handles traditional co-mingle that is going into the landfill. Waste Connections has been running lots of loose waste to the landfill. In order to reduce this, she presented a Tri-County baling facility proposal, put together by others on the Committee, to be implemented in The Dalles to reduce waste and truckloads to Portland. County Court agreed to move forward to look into the program more only at this point.

Amber DeGrange, Juvenile Services, presented a quarterly report. She had six informal cases last quarter that moved over to formal cases. Currently she had three formal cases, and two pending, with all five of the children being involved with Department of Human Services. The cases become very complicated as there are multiple agencies trying to help the children be successful at the same time. She also had five dependency cases with three others that recently closed. DeGrange has continued to work with Northern Oregon Regional Corrections (NORCOR). There is a continued trend of alcohol and marijuana issues; Juvenile Crime Prevention (JCP) funding increased $12,000 per biennium. DeGrange will be working to set up mediation services through the Youth Empowerment Shelter (YES); the County provides funding to YES annually.

Marnene Benson-Wood, Treasurer, presented a quarterly report. She stated there was no change in month to month, or in quarter to annual, and typically always has the same structure set up. The County purchases bonds that go through the broker Time Value Investments, and take the form of callable and non-callable bonds. One just matured for $1,810,000. There was $1,000,000 that went to a money market account at Bank of Eastern Oregon; they requested the funds and guaranteed they would pay the pool rate of 2.57%.

Merrie von Borstel, Biggs Service District, presented a quarterly report. She stated Jacobs is paid monthly to maintain the waste water plant, and some of those funds go to repairs they make for Biggs Service District (BSD). There had been a number of items that needed attention, including the lift station, which will need to be replaced in the future. All customers have been keeping their accounts current. Regarding the BSD Water Project, the new United Stated Department of Agriculture specialist had to wait for some paperwork, which was submitted to the State Office on October 7, 2019 for the eligibility review; once completed BSD will receive a letter. BSD audits have been completed for the year.

Actions taken by the Court included:

  • Approved the Sherman County Credit Card Policy as the final copy, and authorized Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs 2019-20 Transportation of Veterans in Highly Rural Areas Grant Agreement 702-2019-HRTG-003, between Sherman County and the State of Oregon, in the amount of $45,000, and authorized Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved the Intergovernmental Agreement between Sherman and Gilliam County for the provision of independent assessment services necessary to assist the Sherman or Gilliam County Board of Property Tax Appeals in the performance of their functions upon request, and authorized County Court to sign.
  • Approved the Letter of Authorization providing the Sherman County District Attorney authority to sign the CAMI MDT 2019-2021 grant application award documents on behalf of the County for July 1, 2019 – June 30, 2020, and authorized Judge Dabulskis to sign the letter.
  • Approved the Oregon Military Department Office of Emergency Management Homeland Security Grant Program CDFA # 97.067, Grant Number 19-259, between the State of Oregon and Sherman County in the amount of $93,295, and authorized Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Authorized budget transfers/payments as recommended by the Finance Director, including $20,000 to the Weed Sinking Fund, $31,174 to the Community Development Fund, $44,144 to the Emergency Services Fund, $40,000 to the Senior Center Fund, $6,000 to the Wellness Center Fund from the County General. Additionally, transferring $46,657.20 to the County General Fund from the Drivers Education Fund in order to close the Drivers Education Fund. Judge Dabulskis is authorized to sign.
  • Approved the purchase of 2 heavy duty table carts in the amount of $730 for the County-owned tables.
  • Approved the Minutes of October 2, 2019, as corrected.
  • Approved the September 2019 Revenue/Expenditure Summary.
  • Approved the September 2019 Treasurer’s Report, as presented.

Topics of discussion were Written Quarterly Reports and Commissioner Reports.


6. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

Oregon.Flat.poleCreated: 07 November 2019 | Written by Oregon Capital Insider

Here are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon news stories.

  • 5:Democrats vying for the nomination to run for secretary of state, with the addition of Cameron Smith this week. Smith was the head of the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services until he stepped down to run his campaign.
  • 34:Initiative petition that supporters have refiled to set up a state system allowing psilocybin mushrooms for mental health treatment, according to OPB. The new petition no longer calls to decriminalize the measure.
  • $15,000+:Fee the city of Lake Oswego could impose on people who want to demolish homes there, according to Willamette Week. Some cities aren’t happy with the passage of a state law that banned cities over a certain population size from having zones that only allow single-family housing.
  • 90:Days the state board of nursing plans to suspend a nurse who was accused of starving an inmate at the Two Rivers Correctional Institution, according to The Oregonian.
  • $1,500,000:Settlement that inmate received from the state last year over his care in prison.
  • 45,000:Acres of potatoes harvested in Oregon last year, according to the Capital Press.
  • 60,000:Pounds of potatoes per acre.
  • $1,000,000,000:Estimated cost of a new water treatment plant in Portland, according to OPB, nearly double what it was estimated in 2017.
  • $825,000:Amount the state’s Occupational Health and Safety Administration fined five hemp businesses for unsafe working conditions this week, according to The Oregonian.
  • 95:Age of Gert Boyle, who died Sunday, according to The New York Times. Boyle, who took over the company after her husband’s death in 1970, transformed Columbia Sportswear into an enormously successful company.

7. Genealogists! One Week Free Access, New England Genealogical Society Records

genealogy2Free one-week access to millions of records!  New England Genealogical Society and American Ancestors is free starting Tuesday Nov. 12th to Nov. 19th. Just sign in as guest to access records.

https://blog.eogn.com/2019/11/08/free-access-to-all-databases-on-americanancestors-org-from-tuesday-november-12-through-tuesday-november-19/


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Uncovering Oregon’s Treasures at the Oregon Historical Society’s vault

Wheat 101

Nursery again tops list of Oregon commodities


 

Sherman County eNews #276

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

Indescribably Describable

church.family1Last month I spent three days with a number of pastors at a prayer summit. The theme for our prayer this year was the attributes of our indescribable God. These two terms “attribute” and “indescribable” don’t seem like they belong together, but in them being knit together we find incredible hope. An attribute is a quality or characteristic of someone that is integral to who that person is. In that sense, it is an “about them” that we can use words to describe one to another. But when we think of God and Him being indescribable or inexpressible, we think of Him being infinite in every way and fully beyond description.

The absolutely amazing thing about God is that while being infinitely beyond all that we can describe or imagine He also has revealed Himself or made Himself known and knowable to us. While there are things about Him that we do not share such as His eternality which describes Him as existing outside of time and the creator of even time itself, there are other things qualities of Him that He has allowed us to enter into. Our God who describes Himself as the “I Am” or the eternal one created us into time and He knows absolutely every aspect of everything that has, is and will happen in our time. There is nothing about us that is not known to Him and over which He is not in control. He knows the depths of our sin and is perfectly just. But we also know at the same time that He is good, just, gracious and merciful, and He has allowed man to experience on our human scale these things so that we might also appreciate even more those things about Him and worship Him in response.

“But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.” (Romans 5:8)

Joe Burgess
Pastor, Grass Valley Baptist Church


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

pencil.spiraleNEWS POLICIES:

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

NEWS RELEASES. Please submit event and information news, meeting notices and calendar dates by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, how & why with contact or source information. As appropriate, follow up with news of event results. Links are welcome. No posters or flyers. Keep it relevant, no longer than 350 words. No posters or flyers.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.  We encourage letters to the Editor that focus on ideas and opinions about public issues and events rather than personalities or private matters. We reserve the right to change policies at any time and to reject or edit any Letter to the Editor.

  • Keep it short, no longer than 350 words.
  • Keep it simple with one or two clear points. No attachments.
  • Keep it fresh with no more than one letter per writer per month.
  • Keep it civilized, in good taste and free from libel.
  • Keep it relevant; focus on a local event, previous letter or issues of general concern – not personalities.
  • Letters must be signed, name and town. Anonymous letters will not be posted.
  • Please submit Letters to the Editor by using the Submit News page.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life. Your willingness to put it into words is all that is necessary. ~Margaret Cousins

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS: 

SHERMAN COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM. Christmas shopping at The Museum Store and Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day displays December 7 10-3. No admission fee. Brand new items just for the Christmas Sale plus all your year-round favorites. 10% Discount for Sherman County Historical Society members. Got a history buff on your list? MUSEUM MEMBERSHIPS MAKE GREAT GIFTS!

GRASS VALLEY PAVILION. Country Christmas Bazaar 10-2 on December 7th at the Grass Valley Pavilion. 

GRASS VALLEY PAVILION. The 8th Max Nogle Dinner-Auction-Dance will be held at the Grass Valley Pavilion on Saturday, November 16 beginning at 5 pm. Proceeds will go toward continuing improvements to the pavilion. Come and enjoy an evening of good food and fun. AND get a look at the upgraded kitchen!

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

sign.helpwanted

EMPLOYMENT:

INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANT Sherman County School District, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039. Temporary Instructional Assistant for the 2019-20 School Year. Posting. Sherman County School is seeking a Temporary .94 FTE highly qualified Instructional Assistant candidate with preferred previous experience working in an educational setting. The successful candidate will work under the direct supervision of the school administration to support activities as assigned.  This position will start on or close to November 12.  This is a temporary position for the remainder of the 2019-20 school year. Criminal record check and pre-employment drug screening required. For information and application materials please email or call Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us or 541-565-3500. Application Method/Materials Required. Please submit a letter of interest, application (available from the school district), resume, and letters of recommendation if you are interested in the position to: Wes Owens, Superintendent, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039, (541) 565-3500 wowens@sherman.k12.or.us  This position will remain open until filled. Sherman County School District is an equal opportunity employer.

COUNTY COURT ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT. Sherman County is accepting employment applications for the position of County Court Administrative Assistant. This is a permanent, part-time position, 32hr/wk. or 0.80 FTE, Monday-Thursday, salary range $21-$28/hr. dependent on experience. Applicant must be knowledgeable in the operation of modern office equipment including computer systems and programs, possess effective written and oral communication skills, and make decisions independently using effective time management. For job description and/or application, contact the office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416 or go online at http://www.co.sherman.or.us under “Jobs/contracts”. Submit completed application and resume to the Sherman County Court, 500 Court Street, P.O. Box 365, Moro, OR 97039 no later than Tuesday, November 12, 2019 by 5:00 pm. Interviews will be held Friday, November 15, 2019. Successful applicant must pass a criminal history background check. Sherman County is an equal opportunity employer. 11/8

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS. Mid-Columbia Bus Company Seeks Bus Drivers. Do you know someone with time to spare, who loves to drive, and help others? Refer them to Mid-Columbia Bus Company! Once the person you refer becomes certified and drives a full route for at least 30 days, we will donate $1000.00 to a school organization of your choice. What we offer: $13.60 an hour; $500 Sign on bonus; Paid training; Flexible schedule; Dental, Vision, Medical Plan; 401 K … And more. Qualifications: Pass a criminal history check; Have a good driving record; Have a valid Oregon driver’s license; Ability to obtain Class B CDL with training Contact Mid-Columbia Bus Company and tell us where to make a donation today: Amberlena Shaffer, Recruiter. OFFICE: (541) 303-5093Email: amberlena@MidCoBus.com  Website: www.MidCoBus.com

SERVICES:

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE:

KITCHEN AID MIXER. Kitchen Aid Professional Mixer KP2671X  6 Qt 525 watt. includes Burnished Flat Beater, Burnished Dough Hook and Professional Wire Whip. Used 4X asking $200 / best bid. Call 541-442-8572 Nancy 12/27

DEHYDRATOR, JERKY MAKER. New still in the box never opened, Nesco Dehydrator & Jerky Maker FD-60 with 4 trays. asking $45 / best bid. Call 541-442-8572 Nancy 12/27

POSTERS. SHERMAN COUNTY EDUCATION TIMELINE. The 150 years of Sherman County Education; One-Room Schools to One Campus Timeline was dedicated on 10/19/19. The timeline will hang permanently in the school outside the cafeteria. Posters of this timeline are available for purchase. The posters are 16 x 36 and are $30/poster.  There are only seven left.  You may purchase them by calling the Sherman School 541-565-3500 and asking for Kim McKinney. 11/8

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

ROOMS FOR RENT. 2 rooms for rent at the Just us Inn in Wasco. Completely furnished with internet and cable TV.  Room 7 private entrance private bathroom two bedroom single bed and king size in Main. Use of common areas Kitchen and TV area.  — 1 queen size bedroom with shared bath on second floor. Use of common areas TV room and kitchen. Please contact Ron at 503 – 957 – 6114. 11/29

FREE: 

LOST OR FOUND: 

FOUND:

WIG. Halloween wig. Location found- Grass Valley. Call or Text Jeanne at 541-714-5740 to identify and claim.

WANTED:


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

LogoShermanCoSchoolSHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

NOVEMBER

8 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

9 Military Displays Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum, Hood River

9 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Meeting 10:30 Discovery Center

11 VETERANS’ DAY

11 Veterans Day Chimes 11 Maryhill Museum

11 Veterans Appreciation Dinner, Turkey Bingo 5 Wasco School Event Center

11 Veterans Day Open Mic Town Hall 6-8 Sherman Public/School Library

11 Veterans Day Dinner Free for Veterans – Goldendale American Legion

12 Sherman County School District Board Meeting 6 Public/School Library

12 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board Meeting 8:30

12 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

12 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

13 Wasco School Events Center Board of Directors Meeting 6

13-16 Tri-State Grain Convention, Spokane

15-17 Young Farmers & Ranchers Leadership Conference, Portland

16 8th Annual Max Nogle Dinner, Auction, Dance 5 Grass Valley Pavilion

17 Antelope Community Harvest Dinner 2-4 Antelope Community Center

19-21 Association of Oregon Counties Annual Conference

20 Sherman County Court 9

21-23 Oregon Cattleman’s Association Convention, Bend

23 Moro Community Presbyterian Church Thanksgiving Dinner 5

28 THANKSGIVING DAY

snowflakeDECEMBER

2 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10-12 Sherman County

2 Grass Valley City Council 7

3 Moro City Council 7

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Methodist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

5-14 National Rodeo Finals, Las Vegas, Nevada

7 Country Christmas Bazaar 10-2 Grass Valley Pavilion

7 Christmas Shopping at The Museum Store 10-3 Moro

7-8 Cascade Singers Present “A Parker-Shaw Christmas”

9 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

10 Sherman County Watershed Council Board Meeting 8

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District 8:30

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

10-12 Oregon Farm Bureau Convention, Gleneden Beach

11 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

12 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board 4 White Salmon

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

17 Wasco City Council 7

18 Sherman County Court 9

23-31 Sherman County School Christmas Break

25 CHRISTMAS

31 NEW YEAR’S EVE

snowflake4JANUARY

2 Sherman County Fair Board Meeting 7

6 Grass Valley City Council 7

7 Moro City Council 7

8 Rufus City Council 7

8 Sherman Senior Center Advisory 12:30

10 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

11-13 Columbia River Circuit Rodeo Finals, Yakima, Washington