Sherman County eNews #186

CONTENTS

  1. Notice of Job Posting: Sherman County School District

  2. Sherman County Ambulance ASA Plan Advisory Committee Meeting, July 18

  3. Meet and Greet Wasco-Sherman Extension Crops Agent Candidates, July 30-31

  4. The Survivor Personality

  5. Oregon Wheat 2019 Photo Contest!

  6. FREE First Aid, CPR & AED Training, Aug. 1

  7. Sherman County Court Notes, June 5

  8. Sherman County Court Notes, June 19

  9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. NOTICE OF JOB POSTING: Sherman County School District 

Sherman County School District, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039

Custodian

Sherman County School District is seeking a 1.0 FTE custodial/maintenance candidate. The candidate must be self-motivated and is responsible for performing custodial duties, minor maintenance, and other miscellaneous duties on a regimented schedule in order to ensure that the school building and facilities are maintained in a healthy, safe, and sanitary manner.  Medical, dental, and vision insurance are included.

Criminal record check and pre-employment drug screening required. For information and application materials please email or call Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us or 541-565-3500.  This position closes on August 2, 2019.

Sherman County School District is an equal opportunity employer.


2. Notice. Sherman County Ambulance ASA Plan Advisory Committee Meeting, July 18

Sherman County Ambulance

ASA Plan Advisory Committee

Emergency Services Building

Meeting Agenda

July 18, 2019

6:00 PM

1.0     Open Meeting

2.0     Review/Approve September 5, 2018 minutes

3.0     Review 2018 (January – December) Response Statistics

3.1  Dispatch

3.2  Ambulance

4.0     Issues / Concerns

5.0     Next Meeting January 16, 2020 @ 6:00PM

6.0     Adjourn


3. Meet and Greet Wasco-Sherman Extension Crops Agent Candidates, July 30-31

Please join us!

Wasco and Sherman County Extension will be hosting a “meet and greet” for the new Crops Agent candidates for Sherman/Wasco Counties from 2-3 pm on July 30 and 31st. This is a meet and greet only.

The public forum at which the candidates will do a presentation will be held at the Sherman County Office from 10:30 am – 11:30 am, followed by a Q & A Session and Meet and Greet with the Stakeholders from 11:30-12:30 pm.

Both days will be held in the Sherman County Extension Conference Room with a different candidate each day.

Topic: “How would you conduct a research and Extension program in Wasco and Sherman Counties?”


4. The Survivor Personality

When times get tough, some people fold and some are made even stronger. Did you ever wonder why some people seem to be able to handle life better than others? Everyone likes to think that they have what it takes to survive adversity and tough times, but when the chips are down, some folks definitely do better than others.

The real survivors in life (not the participants in the “reality” survivor TV shows that only seem to bring out the worst in human behavior) have developed personalities that allow them more options. They also have a strong and clear intention to survive, and to do it in good shape. When problems or setbacks occur, they don’t waste time complaining and they don’t dwell on the past or what they’ve lost. Instead, their energies are focused on getting things to turn out well.

Survivors believe that, no matter what happens to them, they are the ones who are in charge of their destinies. They don’t get mad at the world for not treating them better. And they do have an extensive menu of behaviors they can choose from, depending on the situation. In other words, survivors are option thinkers with a growth mindset, instead of black and white, either/or thinkers who get by with a fixed mindset.

Survivors also have a wonderful ability to laugh at adversity because they know that even if they lose everything else, they will still have themselves. People with survivor personalities can walk confidently into the unknown because they expect to find a way to make things work out.

So, if you want to be a true survivor, try focusing your attention less on safety and security and more on developing positive beliefs and expectations, built on a firm foundation of reinforced self-esteem. ~The Pacific Institute


5. Oregon Wheat 2019 Photo Contest!

wheat.grainelevatorsEnter to win a pair of Oregon Wheat Mud Flaps at the state level, and top 10 move to Tri-State Level!

Submit your favorite harvest photos to info@owgl.org by September 1, 2019. Please only submit 1 photo per email.
• Include your name, farm name, location of photo and your phone number inside the email text.
• Photo must be in OR/ID/WA
• High Resolution will be requested

Photos will be posted to Oregon Wheat Facebook page (with water marks) and the photo with the most “LIKES” on the Facebook page by October 1, 2019 will WIN a pair of Oregon Wheat mud flaps! The top 10 photos with the most “LIKES” will be entered into the 2019 Tri-State Convention photo contest in November.


6. FREE First Aid, CPR & AED Training, Aug. 1

Through a State Homeland Security Grant, North Central Public Health District (NCPHD) & Wasco Co. Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) are partnering with Mid-Columbia Fire & Rescue (MCF&R) to offer FREE First-Aid, CPR & AED Training!

Date: Thursday, August 1, 2019

Time: 6 p.m.

Location: Mid-Columbia Fire & Rescue Station 1, 1400 West 8th St., The Dalles, OR

You must register to attend, and class size is limited. To register, please call 541-296-9445 or email jwood@mcfr.org.

Through Wasco Co. MRC’s grant, students who complete the training will receive an American Heart Association Heartsaver First Aid Student Workbook, and a course completion card.  NCPHD, Wasco Co. MRC, and MCF&R would like to encourage residents to be trained and involved in your community! The MRC is a community-based volunteer program that helps build the public health capacity of communities

nationwide. Medical and non-medical volunteers are needed. To join or to ask questions, please email Tanya Wray at tanyaw@ncphd.org. For more information, visit the MRC page at ncphd.org or check out the Wasco Co. MRC facebook page.

MCF&R is seeking volunteer firefighter and EMS providers. Please visit their webpage at  https://mcfr.org/volunteering/ to learn more and to complete a volunteer application.

For more information, please contact North Central Public Health District at (541) 506-2600 or visit us on the web at http://www.ncphd.org.


7. Sherman County Court Notes, June 5

Sherman County Court Notes

By Administrative Assistant Kayla von Borstel

NOTE:

– This is a very brief outline ONLY of topics considered “public interest.”

– These are NOT OFFICIAL MINUTES. For official minutes and full details, please see the approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us after the next Court session. Thank you

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on June 5, 2019, and in conducting the business of the County,

  • Approved a 3.30% increase in The Dalles Disposal fees for annual operational costs to be effective July 1, 2019.
  • Adopted the budget approved by the Budget Committee for the 2019-2020 fiscal year in the total sum of $57,490,220, and imposing the taxes provided for in the adopted budget at the rate of $8.7141 per $1,000 of assessed value for operations, and that these taxes are hereby imposed and categorized for tax year 2019-2020 upon the assessed value of all taxable property within the County of Sherman as of 1:00 a.m., July 1, 2019. Additionally to approve appropriations as recommended by the Finance Director, and authorized County Court to sign.
  • Approved the resolution summary of proposed budget changes appropriating fund totals of $8,544,720 to the County General Fund, $146,100 to the Ambulance Fund, and $2,591,343 to the General Road Fund, $162,375 to the County Fair Fund, $1,140,000 to the Courthouse Facility Fund, and $120,000 to the Sheriff Vehicle Reserve Fund, for the Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 2018, and authorize County Court to sign.
  • Adopted the decision and order in the matter of the appeal to the denial of a conditional use permit for a mass gathering in the exclusive farm use zone on behalf of Tectonic LLC, with the 2 added conditions in the event of an emergency, the Sherman County Sheriff has the authority shut down the event, and ticket sales limited to 800 people. Also including the other conditions of approval made by the Planning Commission.
  • Approved the Mass Gathering Application submitted by Tectonic LLC, to hold the SHIFT Festival during the dates of July 18-22, 2019, located at Justesen Ranch Recreation, pending insurance approval, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved resolution 01-06-2019 in the matter of adopting findings in support of emergency status and emergency procurements and approving an expedited emergency procurement process for the purchase of precast bridge slabs, and precast concrete abutments for the Finnegan Creek Bridge, and to include exhibit A, B, and C.
  • Approved Judge Dabulskis to sign the Knife River contracts for the emergency procurements for the Finnegan Creek Bridge.
  • Appointed Daryl G. Ingebo as Sherman County Surveyor with a term to expire June 2020.
  • Appointed Sheri Carlson for a four-year term, to expire July 1, 2023, and Arla Melzer to complete the remainder of Larry Hoctor’s term that expires July 1, 2020, to the Library Board as recommended by the Sherman County Public/School Library Board.
  • Approved Early Childhood Education funding for 2019-2020 fiscal year as follows: Little Wheats $26,667; Sherman County Child Care Foundation (ABC Huskies Child Care) $26,667; Sherman County Preschool  $26,667.
  • Approved Paula King’s sealed bid for the 2008 PT cruiser for $3,501.
  • Approved the Service Agreement between the Sherman County Sheriff’s Office and Bob Thomas as an addition to the Sherman County Wildlife Trapper Agreement, whereas Bob Thomas will provide professional services in the capacity of a Special Deputy, to provide care and service for the capture and/or euthanasia of feral or free ranging canines, and resolution of damage issues caused by such canines. The Annual Agreement fee of $5,000 is part of the total County contribution to the trapping program and not in addition to the designated contractual obligations currently in place.

8. Sherman County Court Notes, June 19

Sherman County Court Notes

By Administrative Assistant Kayla von Borstel

NOTE:

– This is a very brief outline ONLY of topics considered “public interest.”

– These are NOT OFFICIAL MINUTES. For official minutes and full details, please see the approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us after the next Court session. Thank you.

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on June 19, 2019, and in conducting the business of the County,

  • Opened, read, and briefly discussed the three sealed bids received for the Wasco to Rufus Fiber. No action was taken at this time, to allow time to gather technical advice. The decision to award would be postponed until, June 27, 2019, during a Special Session.
  • Discussed the Demoss Park Site Visit and course action for the deteriorating Demoss Spring Park Bandstand. Consensus of the group was to tear down the Bandstand, and build a user-friendly structure in its place with a Demoss family memorial display.
  • Approved Sherman County Oregon State University Extension office, to assume the lease with Sherman County for the 2014 Chevy Traverse, currently in use by the Veteran’s Officer, when it becomes available with purchasing options in the future. Travel expenses, maintenance, fuel, insurance, and all other vehicle expenses to be covered by Sherman County Oregon State University Extension Office’s current travel line item in their existing budget.
  • Approved the vehicle bid from Sherrell Chevrolet in the amount of $36,501.62 to purchase a 2019 Chevy Traverse 3LT for the Veteran’s Officer’s use.
  • Appointed Jayme Thompson to the North Central Public Health District Board as the Sherman County Representative.
  • Briefly discussed the County applying for grant funds through Travel Oregon in the amount of $20,000, to assist Frontier TeleNet with construction costs of a tower at Cottonwood State Park. No cost would be incurred by the County. Consensus of the Court to move forward with the grant application.
  • Approved the purchase of a replacement dishwasher, and for mandatory site preparation of the area to occur for the Senior Center in the amount not to exceed $6,000.00.
  • Approved, as recommended by the Finance Director, a Resolution in the Matter of the County Court Approving the Transfer of Funds Within the County General, Community Transit, Ambulance, Prevention, Community Development, Court Security, Emergency Services, DA-V/WAP, General Road, County Fair, Early Learning Services, Senior Center, Courthouse Facility, and SIP Additional Fees Funds, and authorized County Court to sign.
  • Authorized budget transfers/payments as recommended by the Finance Director, including $5,000.00 from the Emergency Services Fund to the Emergency Services Reserve Fund, and $300,000.00 from SIP Additional Fees to the Fairgrounds Project Fund, and authorized Judge Dabulskis to sign.

9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

The first Europeans weren’t who you might think

The Good News About Nuclear Destruction


 

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Sherman County eNews #185

CONTENTS

  1. Celebrate Apollo! July 16

  2. Sherman County History Tidbits: Where is it?

  3. What’s Coming Up at Sherman County Public/School Library

  4. In The Time Before You Say Goodbye To Those You Love


“How is this controversial? Asking about citizenship? It’s a question that has nothing to do with race at all. It’s about who is American and who is not. … Erasing our history, our sense of who we are, is making it easier to turn America into just kind of another member of a globalist superstate. Europeans sacrificed their identities years ago on the altar of globalism when they formed the European Union. And look at what it got them.” —Laura Ingraham


1. Celebrate Apollo! July 16

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first landing of a human on the moon, Troy Carpenter from the Goldendale Observatory, will give a talk about the mission followed by a high definition showing of the newly released documentary film Apollo 11.

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Goldendale Library, Camplan Community Room

Sponsored by Friends of the Goldendale Community Library and Goldendale Observatory.


2. Sherman County History Tidbits: Where is it?

question-markSherman County History Tidbits. You will find some amazing public art on the route of the Journey Through Time. It is a story of Sherman County in concrete. It’s the work of a remarkable collaboration… Oregon Department of Transportation, a city, a museum and an artist. It’s a perfectly pleasant place to enjoy a picnic.  Where is it?


3. What’s Coming Up at Sherman County Public/School Library

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017
The Library is open BREAK Hours
11am-7pm Tuesday and Thursday
10am-4pm Saturday.

A UNIVERSE OF STORIES
SUMMER READING PROGRAM
Tuesdays in July at 11am

Library After Hours
Every Wednesday this summer 6pm-8pm
Grades 7-12 (entering)
Movies, Games, Food, Crafts, Music, Hang Out.
If you need a ride, please email Abbey at aphelps@sherman.k12.or.us or call the library at 541-565-3279 and we will try and arrange it.

Book Club – July18 at 6pm
The Story of Arthur Truluv


4. In The Time Before You Say Goodbye To Those You Love

Valentine.heartHe was departing on a cruise to celebrate his 70th birthday and we’d unexpectedly caught him a few minutes before leaving port. I could hear steel drums behind him as he excitedly talked about the trip ahead.We briefly shared stories of the Halloween costumes the kids had just picked out at the store, wished him a great time and happy birthday, and told him we loved him and would talk to him in a few days. He went to dinner with my mom and other relatives, explored the ship for a bit—then went to bed and never woke up. Just like that, our time together here was over. Forty-four years would have to be enough for me. It wasn’t… … … Continue here: https://johnpavlovitz.com/2019/06/06/in-the-time-before-you-say-goodbye-to-them/?utm_campaign=coschedule&utm_source=facebook_page&utm_medium=John+Pavlovitz&fbclid=IwAR3Y5fsOKnKcVXycNBrLOGnlYD82MvwBp7kNYt3t3pcXLwA10qlsXFW43rE


 

Sherman County eNews #184

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County 4-H News: Beef Club

  2. South Sherman Fire District Special Meeting, July 16

  3. Columbia Gorge CASA Welcomes New Volunteers

  4. Register Now! Storytelling & the Arts Five-Day Intensive

  5. Opinion: Why we walked by Oregon Sen. Cliff Bentz

  6. The Times-Journal

  7. A New Perspective on Retirement

  8. The Local Food Movement in The Gorge: An Update


Summer safety reminders!

Be mindful of slow-moving tractors and trucks,

just over the hill… or

maybe just around the corner in Biggs Canyon/Spanish Hollow on Hwy. 97,

or in Scott Canyon between Rufus and Wasco

or on Hwy. 206 in Fulton Canyon!

Cyclists are encouraged to avoid harvest market roads.

Please keep all vehicles on paved roads to prevent field fires.


“Here comes the orator! With his flood of words, and his drop of reason.” —Benjamin Franklin (1735)


1. Sherman County 4-H News: Beef Club

4-H clover1The Sherman County Beef Club met on June 11th at 6:15 pm. We met at Doug and Sandi’s house. The meeting was called to order by Courtney and then Courtney and Natalie led the pledges. We discussed how our steers were doing and how much they were eating.  The whole club did speeches on different topics, and then Natalie took us outside to show us how to set up her steers. The meeting was adjourned at 6:45 pm.


2. Notice. South Sherman Fire District Special Meeting, July 16

arrow.blueswishSouth Sherman Fire District is having a special meeting July 16th at 6pm at the South Sherman fire hall. Agenda topics include new board members, financials, and new priorities.

 


3. Columbia Gorge CASA Welcomes New Volunteers

Hood River, OR – Columbia Gorge CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) is pleased to introduce their newest child advocates: Ashley Braniff, Bingen; Greta Root, Mt. Hood; and Brian Rohter, Hood River. After completing 32 hours of training the group was sworn into duty by the Honorable John A. Olson on July 9, 2019. Judge Olson welcomed the newest advocates into duty and subsequently described many of the attributes he feels CASAs bring to the Court and the pertinent information concerning a child CASAs bring to the Court’s attention. 

CASA volunteers are appointed by judges to watch over and advocate for children in the foster care system; we advocate for the needs and well-being of children through professionally trained and supported community volunteers, facilitating that children are heard, receive support through needed services, and reside in loving, safe, permanent homes in a timely manner. CASAs have the tremendous privilege, and responsibility, to have a positive impact in a child’s case. 

More than 400,000 children are in foster care in any given day in the United States, more than 260,000 children have a CASA advocating for their best interests, and more than 85,000 CASA volunteers help change children’s lives every year. 

Columbia Gorge CASA serves children in Hood River, Wasco and Sherman counties; advocates serve children in care so that they might have the chance to live and develop in a safe, nurturing environment.  Volunteers receive 32 hours of pre-service training using the National CASA Volunteer Training Curriculum.  New advocate training sessions will begin in Autumn, 2019.  If you are interested in learning more about the CASA program please contact Michelle Mayfield, Training Coordinator, or Susan Baldwin, Volunteer Manager, at 541-386-3468.  www.gorgecasa.org


4. Register Now! Storytelling & the Arts Five-Day Intensive

From the Heart — Storytelling & the Arts
July 22 – 26 | 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily

Discover the power of stories – a central element of human experience, how we explain and make sense of the world.  We will explore the art of print-making and book-making to create visual stories and dip into storytelling in the performing arts. 

The Institute is led by Maryhill’s executive director, Colleen Schafroth, with some wonderful guest presenters, including Maryhill’s Curator of Art, Steve Grafe, and Education Curator Louise Palermo. We will have a program with Oregon Shadow Theatre, a painting workshop by Ellen Taylor (Cayuse-Umatilla-Walla Walla of Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation) and a relief printing workshop with Northwest artist and printmaker Erik Sandgren. Extracurricular activities include visits to artist’s studios and regional institutions.

Click here for a preliminary syllabus and schedule.

This five-day workshop is designed for educators, artists, and creatives, or anyone interested in integrating the arts into their everyday lives.

Cost: $195 members / $215 non-members. Continuing Education Clock hours will be available at no additional cost through Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Three (3) credit hours will be available through Antioch University Seattle for an additional charge of $150.

Scholarship(s) are available through the Janet P. Swartz and Harriet G. Langfeldt Summer Art Institute Scholarship Fund. For more info email education@maryhillmuseum.org.

To register: Contact Kayla at 509-773-3733 ext. 20.


5. Opinion: Why we walked by Oregon Sen. Cliff Bentz 

Bentz, R-Ontario, represents District 30 in the Oregon Senate.

In a democracy, the majority rules. But when the Democratic majority decided to trade Oregon’s economic free-market system for one of central government control – while ignoring our constitution and making a shambles of Oregon’s rural and low-income economies – we walked.

These parts of House Bill 2020, which would have imposed greenhouse gas-emissions limits on businesses and forced them to buy allowances whose cost, (set by the state), would get passed on to consumers, were particularly egregious… … https://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/2019/07/opinion-why-we-walked.html.


6. The Times-Journal

The Times-Journal is published every Thursday. Deadline is every Monday by 5 PM with the exception of holiday weeks, then it’s the Friday before by 12 noon. Thank you for helping us meet our press deadline! ~Stephen and Renee Allen, Publishers

The Times-Journal serves Wheeler, Gilliam & Sherman counties in print and online. Contact: P.O. Box 746, Condon, OR 97823 | Ph. 541-384-2421 | Fax 541-384-2411 timesjournal1886@gmail.com | Subscribe: $37.50/year; $47.50 for beyond this area.


7. A New Perspective on Retirement 

Many people look forward to retirement, but not everyone finds it pleasant when it finally arrives. How can you make the most out of your so-called “golden” years?

Retirement is a time that some people look forward to and others almost dread. One thing is certain, though, retirement is a time of life that produces many changes – and some of them you might not expect.

For example, John Mosedale, author of “The First Year, A Retirement Journal” pointed out that not having a job any longer can mean a loss of self-esteem and a lessened sense of worth – especially for people whose whole identities have been wrapped up in their work, for many, many years. Mosedale wrote that it is important to figure out who you really are before you retire. It is vitally important to realize that you are far more than what you do at work, no matter how absorbing and interesting your job may be.

If you want to be a well-rounded person and really enjoy your retirement when it rolls around, now is the time to cultivate interests, hobbies and even passions that you can expand and explore more deeply later on. Keeping busy, setting and achieving meaningful goals, maintaining good health and financial security, and especially feeling that you have a purpose in life are keys to a fulfilling retirement.

These things won’t happen by magic when you turn 65 or 70. The time to start is now. What sort of retirement would you like to have? Can you see yourself at age 75 and beyond? What are you doing? Where are you doing it? Can you see who you’ll be doing it with? What can you do right now to make sure this vision of your future becomes a reality?

The Baby Boomer Generation is expected to live longer and more active lives than any past generation. There are those who claim that 60 is the new 40! Considering that, perhaps we need to find a different word to describe “retirement,” one that does not infer stopping or withdrawing, but one that means “having the time of my life.”

After all, when we “re-tire” a car, it means we are putting on new tires, to get where we want to go, for at least another 50,000 miles. Just saying…  ~The Pacific Institute


7. The Local Food Movement in The Gorge: An Update 

Since 2006, we’ve been working to build a resilient and inclusive regional food system that improves the health and well-being of our community. We are farmers, eaters, policy-makers, educators, health-care providers, chefs and food enthusiasts. Over the years our scope of work has expanded way beyond our first project, establishing the Hood River Farmers Market.

Our approach is multi-pronged:
Increase access to local food
Our van full of veggies, the Mobile Farmers Market, delivers fresh produce to “food deserts” where access to quality food is limited. Veggie Rx vouchers are “prescribed” to food insecure families through healthcare providers. This allows patients to purchase locally grown whole fruits and vegetables at farmers markets and farm stands.

Increase the supply of locally produced food
We strive to support local producers by bolstering markets and business development. We work with partners to provide technical training for farmers and producers. We broker relationships between institutional buyers, farmers, chefs, schools, and manufacturers seeking local ingredients.

Increase demand for local food
We manage three farmers markets and support seven others through the Rural Farmers Market Network. The online “Who’s Your Farmer” guide is searchable by product and celebrates hundreds of local producers. GGFN also serves as the regional hub lead for the Oregon Farm to School and School Garden Network to encourage the purchase of local food for school lunch.

Empower and mobilize people to achieve our mission
We believe in a collaborative approach to building a resilient, inclusive food system. The Food Security Coalition, formed in 2016, is a network of more than 40 organizations working together to bolster the local food system, and encourage equitable access to food for all.

Recently, Gorge Grown updated its strategic plan through 2021. What’s new?
Farmland Preservation and Access
Hood River now has the most expensive farmland in the state. The average age of a Gorge farmer is 58, and very few families have a plan for transitioning their farm. Gorge Grown is working with partners to ensure long term access to historical, productive farmland. Join our ad-hoc group by emailing Sarah at Sullivan@gorgegrown.com.

Supporting Tribal Food Sovereignty
Trial Food Sovereignty is the right for indigenous people to define their own diets and shape food systems that are congruent with their spiritual and cultural values. Read more on page 12 of this summer’s Savor the Gorge.

Reducing Food Waste
Through the Columbia Gorge Gleaning Project, we collect fresh fruits and vegetables that would normally go to waste from backyard fruit trees, orchards, and home gardens. The produce we recover is donated to hunger relief groups across the Columbia Gorge Region.

Join us! Volunteer, shop at your local farmers marketjoin our Food Security Coalition, purchase tickets for our annual Harvest Dinner, or donate to support our work.


 

Sherman County eNews #183

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

church.family1The Hope of Perfect Health

Acts chapter 3 tells us of a forty-year-old man being healed who had been lame and unable to walk from birth. He was well-known in Jerusalem because he had asked for help at the temple gates for years. So, you can imagine the excitement that burst forth when people saw him leaping and dancing before their very eyes.

When the apostles Peter and John approached the temple gate, they stopped to respond to this man’s plea. Peter told the man that they had no silver or gold to give him, but what he did have he would. With that he told the man in the name of Jesus Christ the Nazarene to “WALK!” Then immediately Peter reached down and grabbed the man, and as the man was being pulled to his feet, his ankles were strengthened such that he could do the very thing that amazed the masses.

Peter then challenged the gathered crowd to repent or change their minds about Jesus, speaking of the example of the man…. “And on the basis of faith in His name, it is the name of Jesus which has strengthened this man whom you see and know; and the faith which comes through Him has given him this perfect health in the presence of you all.” (Acts 3:16, NASB95) The “perfect health” spoken of was not found in his new-found physical condition, but in his being eternally made whole by faith in Jesus who had done both.

In this life everything fades. But when something happens to us or someone we love, many find themselves challenged to their very core and struggle in knowing where to turn. But in Christ we have great hope. Our God can and does heal according to His perfect will, but more than that He has promised to all who believe through His Son eternal wellness or perfect health that goes far beyond our temporary. God is good. He is our help, and He will not fail. (See 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18)

Joe Burgess
Pastor, First Baptist Church, Grass Valley


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected) 

pen.markereNEWS POLICIES:

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

NEWS RELEASES. Please submit event and information news, meeting notices and calendar dates by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, how & why with contact or source information. As appropriate, follow up with news of event results. Links are welcome. No posters or flyers. Keep it relevant, no longer than 350 words.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. We encourage letters to the Editor that focus on ideas and opinions about public issues and events rather than personalities or private matters. We reserve the right to change policies at any time and to reject or edit any Letter to the Editor.

  • Keep it short, no longer than 350 words.
  • Keep it simple with one or two clear points. No attachments.
  • Keep it fresh with no more than one letter per writer per month.
  • Keep it civilized, in good taste and free from libel.
  • Keep it relevant; focus on a local event, previous letter or issues of general concern – not personalities.
  • Letters must be signed, name and town. Anonymous letters will not be posted.
  • Please submit Letters to the Editor by using the Submit News page.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life. Your willingness to put it into words is all that is necessary. ~Margaret Cousins

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

Participate in the process of your community and country. One person can make a difference. Take a stand. Do something about it. Look hard at your larger community–it may need your specific participation. –Mary Anne Radmacher-Hershey 

EMPLOYMENT:

ASSISTANT CHILD CARE PROVIDER. ABC Huskies Child Care
Assistant Child Care Provider: Part-time position available at ABC Huskies Child Care in Wasco. Experience preferred but will train. Must be a team player, child oriented and able to work flexible hours. For application and further details: 541-442-5024, email abchuskies@yahoo.com . Employment Application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com . 7/26
JUVENILE DETENTION OFFICER & ON-CALL OFFICERS. Great opportunity to gain experience in the field or build a resume! NORCOR Juvenile Detention is seeking to hire a Detention Officer and On-Call Detention Officers.   Applicants must work with diverse groups of youth ages 12-17 years in a secure facility. Professional workplace behaviors required. The on-call position is relief and does not guarantee any hours, can be up to 18 hours weekly.  Criminal record may disqualify. Must have driver’s license, pass background, drug, physical and other testing as indicted by the position. Application & full job descriptions available at NORCOR Juvenile Detention Job Opportunities page @ www.norcor.co  or at NORCOR Juvenile Detention, 211 Webber Street, The Dalles, OR 97048 541-298-1447. 7/26

ODOT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES. The Oregon Department of Transportation is an award-winning organization more than 4,700 employees strong. We are nationally recognized for innovation in environmental considerations, public involvement and customer service, planning and design and more–if it moves, we make it move safer, faster and more efficiently. At ODOT, we have roles in which you can make a difference:

Professional: accountants, auditors, public relations, programmers;

Customer service: field representatives, motor carrier, maintenance;

Environmental: geology, hazardous materials, biology, GIS;

Planning: short- and long-term, local agencies, research and mapping. https://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/About/Pages/Career-Opportunities.aspx  7/19

 HELP WANTED. Sherman County Preschool is looking for a capable person(s) to put together equipment before preschool starts in September. Items to be put together are an outdoor play structure and a couple cabinets/shelves. Pay is negotiable, but please be prepared to provide professional references. Contact Carrie Somnis at shermanpreschool@yahoo.com or (541) 215-0974. 7/12

 TELLER. Bank of Eastern Oregon is now hiring for a Teller at their Condon branch; 30 hours/week, Monday-Friday. Position will also provide coverage to Arlington, Fossil & Moro branches as needed. Valid driver’s license required. Company car provided when travel required to those branches for coverage. Incumbent should have previous cash handling & customer service experience, and be proficient in use of computers; previous banking experience a plus. Successful candidate must pass a pre-employment drug, credit, and background screening. Applicants may apply at www.beobank.com , click on Career Opportunities (towards bottom of Home page). Bank of Eastern Oregon is an Equal Opportunity Employer of minorities, women, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities. Application closing date: 7-8-2019.   7/12

SERVICES:

LAWN CARE. Maria’s Lawn Care. Experienced. Dependable. Reasonable. 541-993-0914.

LOCAL GENERAL CONTRACTOR, HANDYMAN & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Ready for spring projects, large and small, indoors or out. Please call Kevin at 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 7/26

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

newsletter2NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE:

VEHICLES. Surplus for sale by Sherman County:

2000 Ford E450 Bus

Auto Transmission

Mileage: ~ 125,490 miles

As Is Condition

VIN #: 1FDXE4553YHB96056.

2008 Jeep Patriot

Auto Transmission

Mileage: ~ 87,058 miles

As Is Condition: Possible Drive Train Issue

VIN #: 108FF28W18D605526.

2014 Dodge Charger

Auto Transmission

Mileage: ~ 99,856

As Is Condition

VIN #: 2C3CDXAT4EH158884.

Sealed bids must be submitted to the Sherman County Court, P.O. Box 365, Moro, OR 97039 by 5:00 pm Monday July 15, 2019. Bids will be opened and read aloud during County Court on Wednesday, July 17, 2019. ALL ENVELOPES AND BIDS MUST BE LABLED WITH THE ITEM YOU ARE BIDDING ON. Minimum bid for Ford Van: $2,000; Minimum bid for Jeep Patriot: $2,000; Minimum bid for Dodge Charger: $10,000. To request a viewing appointment, contact the Office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416. 7/12

HAND-CRAFTED BARREL STAVE FURNITURE. Locally handcrafted furniture and novelty gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels and other reclaimed materials. Special orders accepted. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | Call Kevin at 541-993-4282 | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com/ 

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:  

FREE:

ONLINE CALENDAR. GorgeCurrent Weekly Calendar. http://www.gorgecurrent.com/weekly/index.html 

LOST OR FOUND:

WANTED:

HELP WANTED. Sherman County Preschool is looking for a capable person(s) to put together equipment before preschool starts in September. Items to be put together are an outdoor play structure and a couple cabinets/shelves. Pay is negotiable, but please be prepared to provide professional references. Contact Carrie Somnis at shermanpreschool@yahoo.com or (541) 215-0974. 7/12


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

wheat.fourJULY

1-31 Sherman County Historical Museum 10-5 Moro

12 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

12-15 National Association of Counties Annual Conference, Las Vegas

12-14 Athena Caledonian Games, Athena, Oregon

13 Traffic Jam: a Car Show Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum, Hood River

14 98th Birthday Ice Cream Social for Eilene & Nita 12:30 Grass Valley

15-18 Food Preservation Day Camp for Kids

16 Frontier Regional 911 Board of Directors Meeting 1:30 Condon

16 Tri-County Community Corrections Board 3:30 Gilliam County

16 Wasco City Council 7 City Hall

17 Sherman County Court 9

18 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Board Meeting 10 NORCOR

20 Starry Night at the Museum – Maryhill Museum of Art

20-21 Maryhill Museum: Free Admission for Sherman County

21-24 Sherman 4-H Kids Food Science Baking Day Camp

22 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Bldg., Moro

22 Maryhill Museum Summer Art Institute

24 Gilliam, Sherman, Wheeler Tri-County Courts 10-2 Condon

24-27 Jefferson County Fair

24-28 Hood River County Fair

27 Fifth Annual Veteran Benefit Expo in Pendleton

31-Aug 4 Union County Fair 

life-jacketAUGUST

1 Sherman County Fair Board 7

1-5 Deschutes County Fair

1-31 Sherman County Historical Museum 10-5 Moro

3 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

3 CGCC Founders Cup Golf Tournament

5 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10-12 Sherman

5-9 Sherman 4-H Kids Drama Day Camp, Sherman County School

5 Grass Valley City Council 7

6 Moro City Council 7 City Hall

6-10 Baker County Fair

6-10 Umatilla County Fair

7 Sherman County Court 9

7 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Executive Board Meeting 4

7 All County Prayer Meeting Rufus Baptist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

7-11 Wheeler County Fair

8-11 Crook County Fair

8-11 Grant County Fair

9 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

13 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

13 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3:30

14 Sherman Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

14 Rufus City Council 7 City Hall

16-18 Equine Mania LLC Summer Escape (541) 980-7394

20 Wasco City Council 7

20-25 Sherman County Fair

21 Cattle Sorting Competition at the Sherman County Fair

31 Rummage Sale 10-3 Wasco School Events Center 

schoolbus.kids.aniSEPTEMBER

1 Rummage Sale 11-3 Wasco School Events Center

1-30 Sherman County Historical Museum 10-5 Moro

2 LABOR DAY

4 All County Prayer Meeting Moro Presbyterian Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

7 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

7 Night on the North Bank, Maryhill Museum’s Annual Benefit Auction

10 Sherman County Watershed Council 8 a.m.

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation Board 8:30

10 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

11 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1


 

Sherman County eNews #182

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Emergency Services June Activity Report

  2. Sherman County Court, July 17

  3. GorgeCurrent Weekly, an Event Calendar

  4. Think of the Possibilities!

  5. GPS-based Soil Information with SoilWeb

  6. OHA announces awards for 2020-2024 coordinated care contracts


1. Sherman County Emergency Services June Activity Report

~Shawn Payne, Sherman County Emergency Services

emergencydial911Sherman County Ambulance

June 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
6/02 5:02 PM Unknown Illness Moro
6/03 7:47 AM Chest Pain Rufus
6/05 2:53 AM Semi- Truck Fire I-84  MP# 113
6/05 9:30 AM Sick Person Rufus
6/06 12:59 PM Sick Person Kent
6/07 5:37 AM Motor Vehicle Crash – Rollover I-84  MP# 109
6/08 7:40 AM Nausea & Vomiting Rufus
6/08 10:54 AM Motor Cycle Crash Hwy 216 & Payne Loop
6/08 11:33 AM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 3
6/09 1:01 PM ATV Crash Grass Valley
6/12 3:46 PM Ankle Injury Moro
6/16 12:19 AM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 48
6/17 11:46 AM Abdominal Pain Wasco
6/19 12:40 PM Motor Vehicle Crash – Rollover US 97  MP# 30
6/21 2:59 PM Chest Pain Biggs Jct.
6/21 9:57 PM Chest Pain Wasco
6/22 6:58 PM Chest Pain Moro
6/24 9:50 AM Motor Vehicle Crash-Rollover US 97  MP# 16
6/24 2:39 PM Fall Injury Bob’s Texas T-Bone in Rufus
6/26 12:55 PM Abdominal  Pain Moro
6/26 4:42 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 101
6/27 3:43 PM Unresponsive Person Sinclair Station in Rufus
6/27 11:06 PM Possible Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 45
6/28 12:13 PM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 35

 

emergencyFireMoro Fire Department

June 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
6-05 2:53 AM Semi-Truck Fire I-84  MP#113
6-05 2:13 PM Grass Fire Drinkard & Baseline
6-10 3:33 PM Grass Fire I-84  MP# 113
6-13 1:54 PM Grass Fire US 97  MP# 3.25
6-18 1:06 PM Grass Fire US 97  MP# 27
6-20 2:44 PM Grass Fire Giles French Park
6-23 6:30 PM Grass Fire – Mutual Aid Gilliam County I-84  MP# 123
6-24 9:51 AM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 16
6-26 3:11 PM Grass Fire from lightning 30 Mile & Dobie Point

 

firetruck.redNorth Sherman County RFPD

June 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
6-05 2:12 PM Grass Fire Drinkard & Baseline
6-05 2:31 PM Vehicle Fire I-84  MP# 113
6-07 5:37 AM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 109
6-08 7:40 AM Ambulance Assist Sinclair Station in Rufus
6-08 11:33 AM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 3
6-10 2:33 AM Grass Fire I-84  MP# 113
6-12 7:17 AM Smoke Investigation I-84  MP# 114
6-13 1:47 PM Grass Fire US 97  MP# 3
6-19 6:43 PM Medical Assist LePage Park
6-20 2:36 PM Grass Fire Giles French Park
6-21 10:05 PM Ambulance Assist Wasco
6-23 6:30 PM Grass Fire I-84  MP# 123 (Mutual Aid)
6-25 5:28 PM Lift Assist Wasco
6-26 3:11 PM Grass Fire 30 Mile Canyon and Dobie Point

2. Notice. Sherman County Court, July 17

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, July 17, 2019, at 9:00 a.m. will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039.  The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us. Agenda topics include quarterly reports by Carrie Pipinich of Mid-Columbia Economic Development District, Sheriff Brad Lohrey, Bob Thomas of Wildlife Services, County Clerk Jenine McDermid, Veterans Officer Bryan Hunt, Marc Czornji of Community Partnership and Engagement Program-2020 Census, Kari Silcox for Sherman County Senior Center, Perry Thurston for City of Moro Downtown Improvement Fund and Shawn Payne for Sherman County Emergency Services; Reading Sealed Bids for Surplus County Vehicles; Appointment to MCEDD Board of Directors; Commissioners’ Reports; and Consent Agenda.


3. GorgeCurrent Weekly, an Event Calendar

where?

  • Events should be located in the Columbia River Gorge, which is defined as Trout Lake, WA to Mt Hood, OR and North Bonneville, WA to Arlington, OR, give or take.

what?

  • The calendar is for “special events” in the Columbia River Gorge
  • Special events examples: live music, speakers, theater, fundraisers, 1-time informational talks, dance, arts events, special sports events or food/drink fests.
  • No on-going items that are the same every week or month. NO on-going classes, on-going wine-tastings or open-mic. Karaoke is not considered a special event. No store sales, MLM sales/gatherings or on-going community/government meetings.
  • Most classes (more than 1 session) are not considered special events
  • Multi-day events (like an art show) are welcome to post the date’s kickoff event.

how?

http://gorgecurrent.com/events/


4. Think of the Possibilities!

What do you believe is possible for you in your life – in your job, with your family and friends, financially, intellectually, emotionally? This is a very important question, so think about your answer for a moment.

These days more and more doctors, psychologists, researchers and many others are beginning to realize that what we achieve and become in life has as much, or more, to do with our beliefs as anything else. Sure, there are some limits. As far as we know, we can’t time-travel or live forever, and we can’t change things like how tall we are or who we have for parents. But beyond a few unchangeable things, there really are unlimited possibilities, and what you believe to be possible is a major factor in determining what you do and who you become.

A favorite Tom Peters story is of a Manhattan cab driver who gave all his passengers a mission statement – his written pledge to get them where they wanted to go safely and courteously. He also gave them a selection of newspapers, a snack basket, and consulted with them about the kind of music they wanted to hear on the radio. This guy made 12 to 14 thousand extra dollars a year in tips because he saw possibilities for himself as a cabbie that others couldn’t imagine.

What possibilities are you blocking out because of what you’ve learned or done in the past, or because of what others have told you is “the truth?” What could you be and do, if you allowed yourself to really stretch and grow, without excuses or self-imposed limitations?

In the days ahead, take some time to let your mind wander, free and unencumbered. Ask yourself the questions, and make a list of your answers: What could you be? What could you do? No limits. No restrictions. Keep it legal, ethical, and in line with your values; but let your imagination run for a while and see what you come up with.

You just might find a new focus and passion for yourself. ~The Pacific Institute


5. GPS-based Soil Information with SoilWeb

PORTLAND, Ore. (July 8, 2019) – Wondering about the best place to build a pond, where to dig post holes, or the crop production capability of your land? Now there’s an app for that!

USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and the University of California at Davis Soil Resource Laboratory have launched the SoilWeb app version 2.0 for Android and iOS devices. SoilWeb delivers GPS-based soil information for the exact soil the user is standing on, allowing users to access over 120 years of soils data from the world’s largest soils database.

SoilWeb is available as a free download on Google Play       and the Apple App Store      .

“SoilWeb reached a new milestone this year when it was integrated with Google Maps and designed to scale across any device, desktop, tablet or smart phone,” said NRCS Chief Matthew Lohr. “SoilWeb app is a portable interface to authoritative digital soil survey data from NRCS, giving users access to practical detailed scientific soil information on the go.”

Newest tool in the shed

The app provides gardeners, landscapers and realtors with information relating to soil types and how to optimally use the soil. Although soil survey information can be used for general farm, local, and wider area planning, a professional onsite evaluation may be needed to supplement this information in some cases.

SoilWeb provides users with information relating to soil types that are associated with their location. The images are then linked to information about the different types of soil profiles, soil taxonomy, land classification, hydraulic and erosion ratings and soil suitability ratings.

SoilWeb is a great way to understand the landscape you live in,” said Anthony O’Geen, UC Davis Professor and Cooperative Extension Specialist in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources. “Producing food, constructing structures and maintaining landscapes all depend on this little understood, but critical outermost layer of the earth’s crust, the soil.”

Deep knowledge

All the soil information in SoilWeb was collected from the National Cooperative Soil Survey, organized by NRCS, and accesses soil survey information the agency has been collecting since the 1890s. The resulting database, the largest such in the world, makes it possible for soil scientists to generate specialized maps using computer-aided techniques.

O’Geen developed SoilWeb with NRCS Soil Scientist Dylan Beaudette, in 2010 when Beaudette was a Ph.D. student at UC Davis. The app was a popular download, but by 2017 was no longer in compliance with requirements set by Apple and Google. Frequent users of SoilWeb had to rely on the web-based version from 2017 to June 2019.

Any users with the older version on their phone can do a simple update to access the newest version. The app is a product of a 14-year partnership between NRCS and UC Davis College of Land, Air and Water Resources.


6. OHA announces awards for 2020-2024 coordinated care contracts

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) announced its intent to award 15 organizations contracts to serve as coordinated care organizations (CCOs) for the Oregon Health Plan’s nearly 1 million members. Eleven of the organizations are approved to receive five-year contracts, and four organizations are approved to receive one-year contracts. Awardees will now be evaluated for their readiness to deliver the services promised in their applications. Successful awardees will sign their contracts, totaling more than $6 billion for the 2020 contract year, in the fall. The new CCO contract services start January 1, 2020.

“We look forward to working together with CCOs and communities to build on the gains of the first six years of health transformation and address gaps and challenges that persist in the state’s health care system,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen. “We set a high bar to ensure these CCOs will be ready to advance the goals of reducing costs, improving access to mental health services, rewarding providers for improving health outcomes, and addressing issues outside the doctor’s office that impact health.”

This next phase of health care transformation is known as “CCO 2.0.”

In October 2018, at the request of Governor Brown, the Oregon Health Policy Board approved a comprehensive set of policies to improve the health of Oregon Health Plan members, address health disparities, control program costs, and continue to transform health care delivery in our state. These priorities were affirmed during an extensive public engagement process that involved more than 2,500 Oregonians who participated in public meetings held across the state as well as phone and online surveys.

Organizations receiving one-year contracts will be placed on remediation plans and have up to one year to show they can meet the higher expectations of CCO 2.0, with technical support from OHA. OHA will extend those contracts beyond one year for CCOs that show they can meet the goals of CCO 2.0. Nearly 87 percent of Oregon’s 1 million OHP members are enrolled in CCOs. Based on the awards, Oregon Health Plan members in every county in Oregon will have at least one CCO to coordinate their health care.

The applicant evaluation reports are available on OHA’s website. Applications were evaluated in the following areas:

  • Care coordination and integration: Ability to coordinate with outside entities (including public and community-based organizations), between levels of care, for special populations of members and to integrate behavioral and oral health services.
  • Delivery system transformation: Innovating to improve care delivery and quality (including primary care), access to culturally and linguistically appropriate care, measurement of value and efficiency of services.
  • Community engagement: Strength of the Community Engagement Plan and of community engagement in developing the application.
  • Clinical and service delivery: Utilization monitoring, ensuring appropriate access to services, clinical review and prior authorization, and approach to addressing complaints and grievances.
  • Business administration: CCO business processes, member engagement and outreach, adoption of electronic health records, data systems, and supporting members during transition.
  • Finance: Applicant solvency, ownership and affiliations, National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) reporting, arrangements with pharmacy benefit managers, plans for increasing value-based payments, tracking and reporting of social determinants of health investments and outcomes, managing within the global budget, and cost containment.

 

CCO 2.0 Contract Awardees

Awardee Contract Length Service Area
AllCare CCO, Inc. 1 year Josephine, Jackson, Curry and partial Douglas
Cascade Health Alliance 1 year Partial Klamath County
Columbia Pacific CCO, LLC 5 years Clatsop, Columbia, and Tillamook
Eastern Oregon Coordinated Care Organization LLC 5 years Sherman, Gilliam, Morrow, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa, Wheeler, Grant, Baker, Lake, Harney, and Malheur
Health Share of Oregon 5 years Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington
InterCommunity Health Network dba InterCommunity Health Network Coordinated Care Organization 5 years Lincoln, Benton, and Linn
Jackson County CCO, LLC, dba Jackson Care Connect 5 years Jackson County
PacificSource Community Solutions – Central Oregon 5 years Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, and partial Klamath Counties
PacificSource Community Solutions – Columbia Gorge 5 years Hood River and Wasco
PacificSource Community Solutions – Lane 5 years Lane County
PacificSource Community Solutions – Marion Polk 5 years Marion and Polk
Trillium Community Health Plan Inc. (Trillium) 5 years Lane, Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington; partial Linn and Douglas
Umpqua Health Alliance, LLC 1 year Partial Douglas
Western Oregon Advanced Health, LLC abn Advanced Health 5 years Coos and Curry
Yamhill County Care Organization 1 year Yamhill, partial Polk and Washington

PrimaryHealth was the only current CCO whose application was denied, due to concerns reported in the organization’s financial review. Three new applicants were also denied contracts.

About coordinated care organizations: Oregon first established CCOs in 2012 to transform health care delivery in the state. CCOs bring together physical, behavioral, and oral health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. They improve health and reduce costs by providing more coordinated, flexible and innovative services. CCOs are rewarded for achieving specific health outcomes and quality measures.

Additional resources: The CCO 2.0 Contract Selection page on the OHA website has more details about the CCO awardees.


 

Sherman County eNews #181

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Court Special Session, July 9 CANCELLED

  2. ODOT Region 4 Weekly Construction Update (selected sections)

  3. Frontier Regional 911 Dispatch Board Meeting, July 16

  4. John Henry Schadewitz 1926-2019

  5. Clamming Clinics in Lincoln City

  6. Crabbing Clinics in Lincoln City

  7. Doing the Wise Thing

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Notice. Sherman County Court Special Session, July 9 CANCELLED

ShermanCoLogoThe Special Session for today, Tuesday, July 9th, 2019, at 2:45 pm via phone conference, in the County Courthouse in the Commissioners Meeting Room, 500 Court Street, Moro Oregon 97039, to approve partnering with Wasco County on the Building Codes Program has been CANCELLED.


2. ODOT Region 4 Weekly Construction Update (selected sections)

Oregon.Flat.poleThe Oregon Department of Transportation is committed to providing a safe, efficient transportation system. ODOT invests in Oregon’s future through roadway improvement projects. The following projects are located in ODOT’s Region 4 encompassing Central Oregon from The Dalles to Klamath Falls on the east side of the Cascades. All work is dependent on weather conditions and schedules are subject to change. Where traffic is routed through or around a work zone, pedestrians, including those with disabilities, will also be provided alternate routes through the work zone.

Sherman County

US 97: Spanish Hollow Creek & Trout Creek Bridges

  • US 97 at MP 0.4 – MP 3.1 & MP 3.2 – MP 7.0 – Stellar J Corporation is completing the second stage of bridge construction. Expect intermittent single lane closures both day and night for the next week to complete bridge deck work. Expect minimal delays at night.
  • US 97 at MP 74.9 – MP 75.18 – Stellar J Corporation has completed this work.
  • US 97: Shaniko to Trout Creek (Sherman Highway; MP 57 – MP 75) – The contractor will be performing asphalt paving, rumble strips, and striping operations nightly Sunday through Friday morning between the hours of 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. One lane of traffic will be closed using flaggers. Traffic should expect delays of up to 20 minutes.

3. Notice. Frontier Regional 911 Dispatch Board Meeting, July 16

 Frontier Regional 911 Dispatch Board Meeting

                                                         July 16, 2019 at 1:30 p.m.

Gilliam County Courthouse – Courtroom

1 –     Approve June 6, 2019 Minutes

2 –     Executive Committee – Sheriff Mike Smith

3 –     Law Enforcement User Group Update – Lt. Jon Terland

4 –     IGA/By-Laws – Sheriff Gary Bettencourt

5 –     Frontier TeleNet Update – Lynn Morley

6 –     GIS Possibilities – Director Renee Heidy

7-      Director’s Update – Director Renee Heidy

  • If necessary, Executive Session may be held in accordance with ORS 192.660 (1)

(e) Property

(h) Legal Rights

(i) Personnel

  • As this is a regular meeting of the Frontier Regional 911 Board, other matters may be addressed as deemed appropriate by the Board.

Agenda Distributed July 9, 2019

Frontier Regional Board Members:

Chair – Sheriff Gary Bettencourt – sheriff@co.gilliam.or.us

Judge Elizabeth Farrar – elizabeth.farrar@co.gilliam.or.us

Sheriff Jim Adkins – jim.adkins@co.jefferson.or.us

Commissioner Mae Huston – mae.huston@co.jefferson.or.us

Sheriff Brad Lohrey – bradlohrey@yahoo.com

Judge Joe Dabulskis – jdabulskis@co.sherman.or.us

Sheriff Mike Smith – mike.smith@co.wheeler.or.us

Judge Lynn Morley – lmorley@co.wheeler.or.us


4. John Henry Schadewitz 1926-2019

flower.rose.starJohn Schadewitz, a long-time farmer and rancher of Sherman County and recently of The Dalles, Oregon, passed away peacefully at the age of 93 on July 2nd, 2019.

John was born on June 6th, 1926 in The Dalles, Oregon, the only child of Carl and Polly (Wilson) Schadewitz.  He attended grade school in Kent, Oregon, and graduated from Moro High School in 1945.

John turned 18 years old on D-Day of WWII, and traveled with his dad to town to register for the draft. Later, he was called in for an interview with a recruiting officer. John was asked what he was doing on his family farm, and John said,

“Well, we have milk cows, beef cows, pigs, and chickens. We are also harvesting hay and wheat.”

The officer responded, “I think you are doing more good for the country on the farm than in the Army.” John was not drafted for WWII.

In 1955, John joined the United States Army and served as a mechanic at the US Army Transfer Station Fort Ord, also at the Army base Hunter Liggett, in Monterey, California during the Korean War. After his time in the service, he returned to Sherman County to work with his parents and later to take over and operate the family wheat and cattle ranch until retiring.

John was elected Sherman County Commissioner in 1980, and served in that position for 15 years. Many of his hours were spent in meetings, travel, and county court proceedings.

John loved to visit, to share a meal or celebrate a holiday with friends and neighbors.

John found his Valentine, and married Levina Jefferies on February 14th, 1981, and they resided on the ranch near Kent.

John and his family are remembered for their kindness and generosity. They purchased many coats and shoes for neighborhood children in need of them during cold winters. John shared his life and his livelihood to the lifelong benefit of others.  John, whose giving heart followed in the footsteps of his parents, many times and in many ways, provided incredible levels of generosity.

John was preceded in death by his father, Carl, his mother, Polly, and his wife, Levina. He is survived by a community of good friends and neighbors.

Viewing will be from 2-6 PM on Thursday, July 11, at Spencer, Libby & Powell funeral home in The Dalles, Ore.  A graveside service for John will be held at the Kent Cemetery at 11:00 AM on Friday, July 12th. Immediately afterwards will be a celebration of life at the Kent Baptist Church with a potluck lunch to follow.

Carsten von Borstel – Officiant

Stan Earl – Vocalist

Deanna Padget – Pianist

Pall Bearers – Larry von Borstel – Lee von Borstel – Tim Jefferies

Jack Jefferies – Pat Jefferies – John Page.


5. Clamming Clinics in Lincoln City

From late spring through early fall, stop by a clamming clinic in Lincoln City. Everyone is welcome and no registration is required. Enjoy the wonderful bounty that Siletz Bay has to offer!

Clamming Clinic attendees will meet at the gravel pullout just north of the Bay House Restaurant located on the west side of Hwy 101. To get there, travel south on Hwy 101 in Lincoln City through the traffic signal at SW 51st Street in the Historic Taft District. Cross over the Schooner Creek Bridge and go past the asphalt paved Schooner Creek wayside parking area. Park at the next gravel pullout just south of the Schooner Creek wayside (underneath the billboard sign).

REQUIREMENTS

Each clam digger 12 years or older will need:

  • Shellfish license (available at locations listed below)
    • Clam bag* or 5 gallon bucket*
    • Shovel*
    • Pair of gloves to protect your fingers
    *NOTE: Materials and supplies should be purchased prior to attending the clinic.

2019 CLINIC DATES

  • Saturday, May 4 @ 11:30 AM
    • Monday, June 10 @ 11:30 AM
    • Monday, June 24 @ 10:30 AM
    • Monday, July 8 @ 10:30 AM
    • Thursday, August 8 @ 11:30 AM
    • Thursday, September 5 @ 10:00 AM

See more information here: https://www.oregoncoast.org/clamming-clinics/


6. Crabbing Clinics in Lincoln City

crab2From late spring through early fall, stop by a crabbing clinic in Lincoln City. Everyone is welcome and no registration is required. Enjoy the wonderful bounty that Siletz Bay has to offer!

Prior to crabbing, participants will meet at the pavilion located at the end of SW 51st Street in the Historic Taft District of Lincoln City for a brief orientation. The orientation will familiarize participants with Oregon’s crabbing regulations, harvest methods, identification, and cleaning and cooking techniques.

Parking is available between Mo’s Restaurant and the pavilion. Flat access to the bay is available at the end of SW 51st Street, which is ADA compliant.

Each crabber is allowed to crab with up to 3 devices. Crabs snares used with fishing poles work well but not nearly as well as folding crab traps.

REQUIREMENTS

Each crabber 12 years or older will need:

  • Shellfish license (available at locations listed below)
  • Crab traps* or 5-gallon bucket*
  • Grab gauge*
  • Large package of chicken legs for bait*
  • Pair of rubber gloves to protect your fingers*

*NOTE: Materials and licenses should be purchased prior to attending the clinic.

2019 CLINIC DATES

  • Tuesday, May 21 @ 1:45 PM
  • Thursday, July 25 @ 11:00 AM
  • Wednesday, August 28 @ 3:30 PM
  • Monday, September 30 @ 12 NOON

See more information here: https://www.oregoncoast.org/crabbing-clinics/


7. Doing the Wise Thing

How confident are you that the decisions you make are good ones? What do you do if you are not sure? Today, let’s talk about making decisions.

Have you ever watched someone throw good money after bad? Maybe it’s their car – one expensive thing after another breaks down, but they just keep shelling out the cash to fix it. When you ask why they don’t get rid of it and buy another, they tell you about all the money they’ve spent to repair it and keep it running.

It seems to be human nature that when we make a decision, such as what kind of car to buy, we do not like to be wrong. It upsets our ego to think we have made a mistake, so we try to convince ourselves that it was the right decision. Sometimes, we will rationalize away information that contradicts our decision, or we develop a scotoma (a mental blind spot) and we don’t even see the conflicting evidence, even when it’s right under our nose.

Now, there is a lot to be said for persistence, for sticking with something until it pays off. But there is a real advantage in being able to recognize that there isn’t going to be a payoff when that is the truth, and acknowledging that mistakes are simply part of being human.

If you have any doubt about the wisdom of a decision, sit down and realistically weigh the pros and cons. Make a list of costs – including intangibles like time and stress – as well as benefits. If you decide it is time to cut your losses, let go of that part of yourself that insists on always being right, and, instead, make a decision to do the wise thing. ~The Pacific Institute


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeHave you been to the Sherman County Historical Museum this summer?

How about a road trip? Journey Through Time Scenic Byway!

Discovery in July at Maryhill Museum

Frontier TeleNet Meetings: Audio Recordings

Gilliam County, Oregon | Wheat. Wind. Waves.

Oregon Paleo Lands Institute (OPLI) Center in Fossil

Travel Oregon: Clamming & Crabbing Clinics

1600 Daily | The White House | ‘Salute to America’

Defense News

Military Times

Of Course the Census Should Ask a Citizenship Question

Census Should Ask About Citizenship – But Supreme Court Fails to Resolve Issue

U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer Joins With Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Bernie Sanders in Effort to Declare a Climate Emergency


 

Sherman County eNews #180

CONTENTS

  1. What’s Coming Up at Sherman County Public/School Library

  2. Sherman County Court, July 17

  3. Help Wanted: Assistant Child Care Provider ABC Huskies Child Care

  4. Call for Sherman County Artists & Crafters

  5. Wasco County Historical Society Teams Up with Sandoz Century Farm, July 20

  6. A Space to Spark

  7. CGCC Founder’s Cup Golf Tournament, Aug. 3

  8. I Hear America Singing

  9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. What’s Coming Up at Sherman County Public/School Library

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017The Library is open BREAK Hours
11am-7pm Tuesday and Thursday
10am-4pm Saturday.

A UNIVERSE OF STORIES
SUMMER READING PROGRAM
Tuesdays in July at 11am

Galaxy T-Shirt Take 2
Tuesday, July 9 at 6:00pm
Come make your own Galaxy T-shirt. Please bring your own WASHED shirt. Black and dark colored shirts look great!

Library After Hours
Every Wednesday this summer 6pm-8pm
Grades 7-12 (entering)
Movies, Games, Food, Crafts, Music, Hang Out.
If you need a ride, please email Abbey at aphelps@sherman.k12.or.us or call the library at 541-565-3279 and we will try and arrange it.

Summer Movie Night – July 11 at 6pm
Captain Marvel
Rated: PG-13
Run Time: 2hrs 3min.


2. Notice. Sherman County Court, July 17

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court session on Wednesday, July 17, 2019, at 9:00 a.m. will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039.  The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.


3. Help Wanted: Assistant Child Care Provider ABC Huskies Child Care

Assistant Child Care Provider: Part-time position available at ABC Huskies Child Care in Wasco. Experience preferred but will train. Must be a team player, child oriented and able to work flexible hours. For application and further details: 541-442-5024, email abchuskies@yahoo.com. Employment Application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com.


4. Call for Sherman County Artists & Crafters

art.toolsIt is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information.


5. Wasco County Historical Society Teams Up with Sandoz Century Farm, July 20

Wasco County Historical Society invites the public to join them at the Sandoz Century Farm July 20th, 11:00 a.m. Saturday, 5755 Mill Ck. Rd. in The Dalles.  Family members Mary Sandoz Leighton and Holly Sandoz will share the history of the Farm dating back 139 years. The meeting will be held in the one-room school house next to their Farm Stand.  Free event.


6. A Space to Spark

How do you close the gap between the reality you are living in now and the life you want for yourself in the future? Let’s say you feel that life you are living right now is not the one you want to live. You could do and be so much more, and you know this. However, somehow things just never seem to change much for you.

Does this sound familiar? Are you, or someone you are close to, trapped in an unwanted life, feeling stuck and unable to move? Here is a suggestion for moving forward. Why don’t you try imagining the future you want for yourself? Imagine it so vividly and specifically that you can actually see it. Then, take it even further. Hear it, taste it, feel it, walk around in it! Make it like a movie, starring you.

If you’ve done a good job imagining this future, when you come back to reality, you will be aware of a gap between where you are now and where you want to be. You may feel a bit uncomfortable, but this is good! You see, it is this gap that releases your energy and creativity. Did you know that gas-powered automobiles only move because they have a gap in the spark plug? There has to be room – a space – for the spark to ignite. The same goes for you, for all of us.

For us humans, that space between the way things are and the way we want them to be is the very same space where our drive, energy and creativity have room to ignite. It is the drive and energy that are required to close the gap. Without a vision, a vivid picture of the future you want in your mind, there is no gap. There is no gap, no space, for you to discover your own power.

First, try creating a vision. Then, work at strengthening it every day. Watch what happens when you create a little space for that spark to ignite. ~The Pacific Institute


7. CGCC Founder’s Cup Golf Tournament, Aug. 3 

golf2The 20th Annual Founder’s Cup Golf Tournament, presented by Columbia State Bank and Columbia Gorge Community College Foundation, will be held at Indian Creek Golf Course in Hood River on Saturday, Aug. 3. The annual event promises a fun-filled day that brings together golf, friends, food, and raffle prizes. This year, the tournament will benefit student scholarships.

Sponsorship opportunities and four-person team entries are available. To sponsor the tournament, or to register a team at either the gold ($600) or silver ($500) team level, please contact Stephanie Hoppe, shoppe@cgcc.edu or call (541) 506-6113. Only 28 teams may enter the tournament so please contact the foundation to register a team at your earliest convenience.  For more information, visit cgccfoundation.org.


8. I Hear America Singing

By Walt Whitman 1819-1892

I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear,
Those of mechanics, each one singing his as it should be blithe and strong,
The carpenter singing his as he measures his plank or beam,
The mason singing his as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work,
The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat, the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck,
The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench, the hatter singing as he stands,
The wood-cutter’s song, the ploughboy’s on his way in the morning, or at noon intermission or at sundown,
The delicious singing of the mother, or of the young wife at work, or of the girl sewing or washing,
Each singing what belongs to him or her and to none else,
The day what belongs to the day—at night the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,
Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs.


9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbVigeland Sculptures in Frogner Park in Oslo, Norway

Memorial.  The Children´s War Victims Monument

Hermiston Herald: 14 new Oregon laws to know about

For Oregon Hemp Farmers, The Future Is Green

High Plains Journal: US soy in 100 million panels of Purebond Plywood

Prager U. Video – Was Jesus a Socialist?

The DEBKA File. We start where the media stop.

8 Frank Lloyd Wright buildings named UNESCO world heritage sites

6 Best Game of Thrones Board Games & Expansions Reviewed & Ranked

U.S. states with the most veterans