Sherman County eNews #78

CONTENTS

  1. CorrectedSherman County Preschool Open Enrollment, April 5

  2. Two Centuries of Immigration Visualized

  3. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Spring Grant Cycle

  4. Wasco County Historical Society Poker Run to Benefit Society Programs, April 14

  5. Sherman County Court Notes for February 20

  6. Sherman County Court Notes for March 6

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Corrected: Sherman County Preschool Open Enrollment, April 5

Sherman County Preschool is looking ahead to next school year.  We will be holding an open enrollment at 6pm on April 5th in the preschool.  We encourage anyone interested in their child attending preschool to complete an enrollment packet.  Space is limited to 20 children and Head Start spots are limited as well.

To be eligible for the 2019-2020 preschool year your child must be 3-5 years of age on or before September 1st, 2019 and be potty trained.  We contract with both North Central ESD and Umatilla Morrow Head Starts to provide Head Start services to qualifying families.  They are both wonderful agencies with great employees who love to help kids and their families, but again spots are limited so you don’t want to miss out on signing up.  Most, if not all, spots will be filled by early summer.

Sherman Co. Preschool is a QRIS 5-star program with a Director (Carrie Somnis) & 3 Teachers (Brenda Massie, Sarah Goodenough & Miranda Owens) who love children and have over 30+ years of combined teaching experience.  Sherman Co. Preschool is located in Moro in the elementary wing of the Sherman County School.  We introduce preschoolers to learning in a warm and caring environment that encourages children to learn through play and structured small group activities.  We offer transportation services in the afternoon with stops in Moro and Wasco at each daycare.

If you are unable to make the open enrollment but are interested in your child attending preschool next year please send an email to shermanpreschool@yahoo.com with your name, mailing address, and child’s age/name as of September 1st, 2019.

Feel free to call the preschool directly with any questions.  The phone number is (541) 565-3320, hours are 7:30am-2pm Monday-Thursday.  During preschool hours (8am-12pm) we are busy with kids & may not answer, but please leave a message and someone will return your call as soon as possible.


2. Two Centuries of Immigration Visualized

See an amazing animated map here:

http://metrocosm.com/us-immigration-history-map.html.


3. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Spring Grant Cycle

arrow-rightApplications for the 2019 Spring Grant Cycle for Sherman County’s Cultural Coalition are now being accepted. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: March 29, 2019

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: https://www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:

Sherman County Cultural Coalition
P.O. Box 23
Moro, OR 97039

Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


4. Wasco County Historical Society Poker Run to Benefit Society Programs, April 14

cargreencoupeWasco County Historical Society invites the public to join them in their Sunday, April 14th, 40-mile long “Poker Run”.  Registration is 10:00-1:00 in the parking lot at the Discovery Center & Museum.  Ten dollars per “hand” with multiple hands available.

The route follows the Historical Hwy. into Mosier, back into The Dalles over Sevenmile Hill, with optional stops along the way.  All motorized vehicles are welcome with the entire route being paved roads.  It’s a fun way to explore our history!

Additional details may be obtained from John Brookhouse at 541-980-0918.


5. Sherman County Court Notes for February 20

By Administrative Assistant Kayla von Borstel

*NOTE:

– This is a very brief outline ONLY of topics considered “public interest”.

– These are NOT OFFICIAL MINUTES. For official minutes and full details, please see the approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us after the next Court session. Thank you.

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on February 20, 2019, and in conducting the business of the County,

  • agreed to amend the proposed draft resolution in the County Court of the State of Oregon in and for the County of Sherman County in the matter of requesting that the Oregon Business Development Department designate a Rural Renewable Energy Development Zone (RREDZ) in Sherman County Oregon with the County of Sherman setting the amount of real market value (RMV) for qualified property that may be exempt in this RREDZ from $50 million to $250 million, based on the RMV of property for the assessment year at the start of the exemption immediately after property is placed in service;
  • approved the resolution as amended during Sherman County Court in the County Court of the State of Oregon in and for the County of Sherman County in the matter of requesting that the Oregon Business Development Department designate a Rural Renewable Energy Development Zone (RREDZ) in Sherman County Oregon, and authorized the County Court to sign;
  • discussed the Coordinating Care Organization (CCO) Boundary Change;
  • appointed Janet Pinkerton to the Senior Center Advisory Board for a term of 3 years to expire December 31, 2021;
  • appointed Gary Thompson to the Sherman County Grant Housing Review Committee;
  • appointed Roger Whitley to the North Central Public Health District Board for a term of 2 years to expire December 31, 2020;
  • removed Linda Thompson from the North Central Public Health District Board;
  • removed Kari Silcox from the Mid-Columbia Community Action Council (MCCAC);
  • approved the Association of Oregon Counties (AOC) County College tuition for Commissioner Bird in the amount of $750 for the 2019 year;
  • approved Oregon State University (OSU) proposal for an Ag Extension Agent to be housed in Sherman County, with total County cap set at $120,431.00 for the position;
  • approved the Biggs Service District Ordinance #11-7-18, in the County Court of the State of Oregon in and for the County of Sherman for an ordinance establishing regulations regarding connections, operations, and rates for water services for the Biggs Service District;
  • noted that Cindy Heater-Judah, Senior Center Head Cook, will be retiring soon, and Kari Silcox, Senior Center Manager, placed an ad for her replacement, it was stated Commissioner Bird would sit in on the hiring committee to represent the County Court.

6. Sherman County Court Notes for March 6

By Administrative Assistant Kayla von Borstel

*NOTE:

– This is a very brief outline ONLY of topics considered “public interest”.

– These are NOT OFFICIAL MINUTES. For official minutes and full details, please see the approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at http://www.co.sherman.or.us after the next Court session. Thank you.

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on March 6, 2019, and in conducting the business of the County,

  • met as the Compensation Board;
  • approved a 2.8% Cost of Living Adjustment (COLA) increase for County Employees for fiscal year 2018-2019;
  • agreed to continue Employee insurance benefits at the current level;
  • entered into Executive Session in Accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (i) Personnel;
  • approved Compensation Board Merit Decisions, approved step increases for those eligible with the following written requests: Travis West, Kyle Pfeifer, Paul Yoon, Solomon Jacobson, Bruce Olsen, Gary Shull, Richard Jauken Jr., and Amy Asher, with Amy’s weekly hours increasing from 20 hours to 25 hours per week;
  • approved step increases for the following County Employees: Kristi Brown, Daniel Son, Magee Kennedy, Drew Messenger, Kayla von Borstel, Kari Silcox, Dan Aldrich, and the RV Camp Host to increase from $350 per month to $400 per month, as requested by Georgia Macnab;
  • approved the Weed Control Intergovernmental Agreement between the State of Oregon, and Sherman and Wasco Counties, as the State wishes to utilize County resources to provide vegetation and noxious weed abatement within the State jurisdiction and right of way, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign;
  • appointed Sharon Spencer to the Senior Center Advisory Board for a term of 3 years to expire December 31, 2021;
  • appointed Dan Aldrich to the Special Transportation Committee for a term of 3 years to expire December 31, 2021;
  • proclaimed the week of April 7-14, 2019, as Sherman County Crime Victims’ Rights Week and authorized Judge Dabulskis to sign;
  • approved the Sherman County Public Transportation Advisory Committee proposed Bylaws amendment, and authorized County Court to sign;
  • approved the submittal for the Special Transportation Grant Application for the 2019-2021 Biennium;
  • approved the grant submittal form for the Special Transportation 5310 Grant Application for the 2019-2021 Biennium;
  • heard Commissioner McCoy present the Court with County projections from 2018 to 2025, with 2017 actual figures, to aid in planning for special projects using Strategic Implementation Program (SIP) funds during the next seven years, which included one year after the SIP funds cease, and the last scheduled payments to the Sherman County School District and reserves would be due. His projection sheets summarize all County expenditures and revenue.

7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbOregon House Bill 2297 | Preliminary Summary | Maintains Oregon Daylight Savings Time

The Morning Brew: News Deserts or Communities with Little or No Local Reporting

Subscribe to The Morning Brew

Two Centuries of Immigration, Animated

 “We do not believe any group of men adequate enough or wise enough to operate without scrutiny or without criticism. We know that the only way to avoid error is to detect it, that the only way to detect it is to be free to inquire. We know that in secrecy error undetected will flourish and subvert”. – J Robert Oppenheimer.

Global Research. New Study on Species Extinction

The Advent of Extreme Weather Events and Climate Tipping Points

Media Bias Fact Check


 

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Sherman County eNews #77

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County 4-H News Reports: The Tiny Teaspoons

  2. Charlotte Lenore (Ruggles) Barnett 1917-2019

  3. Sherman County Preschool Open Enrollment, April 5

  4. Farm Service Agency Accepts Applications for Program Technician

  5. Unearned Guilt

  6. The Morning Brew: News Deserts or Communities with Little or No Local Reporting

  7. Oregon House Bill 2297 | Preliminary Summary | Maintains Daylight Savings Time

  8. College readies surplus sale March 29-30


1. Sherman County 4-H News Reports: The Tiny Teaspoons

4-H clover1The Tiny Teaspoons 4-H club met on March 18, 2019 at 3:30pm at the Cranston’s house. Attending were Lexi, Coral, Maddie, Addie, Bella, Ava, Savannah B, Savannah D. Special guests were Gail Macnab and Debbie Bird. Pledge of Allegiance was led by Bella and the 4-H Pledge was led by Savannah D. Today we made Irish Soda Bread from a recipe out of It’s All Relative, Favorite Recipes of the Macnab Sisters, Family and Friends and Irish Soda Scones. While we were baking those, we each made a Shamrock Pretzel Pop and made tea.  When we were tasting the food, we played a game with kitchen verbs. After we played, we were talking about what we made. Our next meeting will be in April. Meeting was adjourned at 5:30pm. Signed Alexis Holt and Maddie Cranston.


2. Charlotte Lenore (Ruggles) Barnett 1917-2019

flower.rose.starCharlotte Barnett passed away peacefully Saturday, March 16, 2019, at Flagstone in The Dalles, Oregon.

Charlotte was born May 27, 1917, in Moro, Oregon, at her Grandparent Hulse’s home to Oscar and Allie (Hulse) Ruggles. She joined two siblings, Orville and Zela (McKinney) and the family soon moved to their place at Finnegan. They attended the Liberty School three miles from home and then went to the Grass Valley School when Charlotte was in the sixth grade through high school where she excelled in sports.

Charlotte married Willard Henry Barnett when she was 18 on August 29, 1935. They bought the ranch two miles north of Grass Valley where she lived until after she turned 99, when she moved to The Dalles. Charlotte and Willard’s son Keith was born November 11, 1936.

She is survived by Keith & Marilyn (Smith) Barnett, grandson Lee Barnett & Laurie Booth, great-grandchildren Brandan & Abigayle Barnett and Morgan Barnett, and two great-great-grandchildren, Addyson Mae and Wyatt Benjamin.

Charlotte’s funeral will be held at 11:00 a.m., Friday, March 22, 2019, at the Grass Valley Baptist Church. A potluck meal will follow the service at the church. Please bring a side dish or dessert.


3. Sherman County Preschool Open Enrollment, April 5

boy.telephonetalkSherman County Preschool is looking ahead to next school year. We will be holding an open enrollment at 5:30pm on April 5th in the preschool. We encourage anyone interested in having their child attend preschool to complete an enrollment packet. Space is limited to 20 children and Head Start spots are limited as well.

To be eligible for the 2019-2020 preschool year your child must be 3-5 years of age on or before September 1st, 2019 and be potty trained. We contract with both North Central ESD and Umatilla Morrow Head Starts to provide Head Start services to qualifying families. They are both wonderful agencies with great employees who love to help kids and their families, but again spots are limited so you don’t want to miss out on signing up. Most, if not all, spots will be filled by early summer.

Sherman County Preschool is a QRIS 5-star program with a Director, Carrie Somnis, and three teachers, Brenda Massie, Sarah Goodenough and Miranda Owens, who love children and have over 30+ years of combined teaching experience. Sherman County Preschool is located in Moro in the elementary wing of the Sherman County School. We introduce preschoolers to learning in a warm and caring environment that encourages children to learn through play and structured small group activities. We offer transportation services in the afternoon with stops in Moro and Wasco at each daycare.

If you are unable to attend the open enrollment but are interested in your child attending preschool next year please send an email to shermanpreschool@yahoo.com with your name, mailing address, and child’s age/name as of September 1st, 2019. Feel free to call the preschool directly with any questions. The phone number is (541) 565-3320, hours are 7:30am-2pm Monday-Thursday. During preschool hours (8am-12pm) we are busy with kids & may not answer, but please leave a message and someone will return your call as soon as possible.


4. Farm Service Agency Accepts Applications for Program Technician

The Gilliam-Wheeler County Farm Service Agency (FSA) is accepting applications for a permanent Program Technician in Condon, Oregon. Applications will be accepted beginning Thursday, March 21 and closing Wednesday, April 3rd. Salary range of $26,587 – $53,773 per year based on qualifications and experience. A copy of the vacancy announcement and application may be obtained on line by visiting: https://www.usajobs.gov/ and searching for “Farm Service Agency” and location “Condon, OR.” For more information, please contact the FSA Office at 541-384-4251 ext 2. The Federal Service offers a comprehensive benefits package. Explore the benefits offered to most Federal employees at: https://www.usa.gov/benefits-for-federal-employees.


5. Unearned Guilt

People who would never think of trying to drive a car with the brakes on often do something very similar to themselves.

A wise and funny woman once said, “Show me a person without guilt, and I’ll show you a person without a mother!” Now, she herself was a mother and guilt, when it’s appropriate, is a useful function of a healthy conscience.

The point she was making through humor is that all of us suffer from at least a touch of guilt and feelings of unworthiness. When these feelings grow large enough to take over, it’s like trying to drive a car with the brakes on. You may go forward in fits and starts, but you won’t go very far.

Guilt and unworthiness are things we were taught to feel as children by well-intentioned, but misguided adults who probably didn’t realize the damage they were doing. By the time we became adults, these feelings were so ingrained that they became automatic responses – part of our self-image.

That’s the bad news. The good news is that you can take yourself off automatic and bring your consciousness to bear on these feelings. You can learn how to refuse to accept unearned guilt and forgive the people who unwisely taught you to feel unworthy. Chances are, they too were taught that way. But you can break that cycle.

A commitment to get rid of unnecessary guilt is a great place to start. Seek out resources – counselors, teachers, friends, classes, books, online video resources – that can help you feel the peace and personal power that is your birthright. Appropriate guilt is one thing, but unearned guilt is a whole other ballgame – and one we don’t need to play. ~The Pacific Institute


6. The Morning Brew: News Deserts or Communities with Little or No Local Reporting

newspaper-arrowLast year, Facebook released Today In, an initiative to highlight local news stories. Yesterday, Facebook launched This Is Actually Terrible, showing that in many places in the U.S., there isn’t enough local news to fuel Today In.

The report: Facebook (-3.32%) teamed up with academic researchers to measure news deserts, or “communities with little or no local reporting.” Here’s what they found:

  • About one-third of Facebook’s U.S. users live in areas that do not have sufficient local reporting to support Today In.
  • There’s not much regional bias, either. 26% of users in the West and 35% in the Midwest, Northeast, and South suffer from a lack of local news.

This map does a good job of illustrating the problem. The more green, the more local news. The less green…the less you know of the delights of reading a small town police blotter.  Read the rest at https://www.morningbrew.com/stories/the-facebook-post/.


7. Oregon House Bill 2297 | Preliminary Summary | Maintains Daylight Savings Time

https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2019R1/Downloads/CommitteeMeetingDocument/174052

clock.793WHAT THE MEASURE DOES:

Abolishes annual one-hour change in time from standard time to daylight saving time and maintains Oregon on daylight savings time.

BACKGROUND:

Daylight saving time is the practice of setting the clock one hour forward for 34 weeks of the year, allowing for more daylight in the evening hours. The United States used daylight saving time at times during World War I and II, with some state and local governments persisting in the practice. The Uniform Time Act of 1966 standardized

the practice nationwide, and allowed states to exempt themselves. Hawaii and Arizona, with the exception of the Navajo Nation, do not observe daylight saving time. Measures introduced in Congress, California, and Washington would end the twice-yearly time change and permanently maintain daylight saving time. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 26 states have introduced measures ending the practice of twice-yearly time changes.

A 2008 study concluded that the time spent changing clocks represented a $1.7 billion opportunity cost to the U.S. population. Another study found that daylight saving time costs the U.S. economy more than $433 million each year in the form of cardiac incidents, workplace injuries in the mining and construction sectors, and “cyberloafing”

in office settings. A 2014 study found a 6.3 percent increase in fatal automobile accidents over the six days following the time change. Senate Bill 320 ceases the one-hour time change and places Oregon permanently on daylight saving time. The measure is referred to voters for their approval or rejection the next regular general

election. Senate Joint Memorial 6 urges Congress to allow states to permanently maintain themselves on daylight saving time.


8. College readies surplus sale March 29-30

Every homeowner knows the feeling: You look around the house and realize other folks might find a better use for stuff you’re just not using anymore.

Staff at Columbia Gorge Community College recently completed a materials inventory and learned the college, too, needs to do a little spring cleaning. People are invited to see the results when the college hosts a Surplus Sale on Friday, March 29, from noon to 5 p.m. and Saturday, March 30, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Fort Dalles Readiness Center. The Readiness Center is located on The Dalles Campus at 402 East Scenic Drive.

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, which has offices on the college campus, is also participating in the event. All items are priced to sell; sale of college items will benefit the college’s general fund, while sale of surplus items from Oregon DEQ will benefit the college foundation’s general scholarship fund. Surplus items are posted on the college’s website, and include projectors, fire-proof safes, arc welders and welding hoods, a laser printer, desks, laptops, computers, office chairs, lecterns, shelving, book cases … even a set of barn doors.

For details, visit the college website, www.cgcc.edu.


 

Sherman County eNews #76

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County High School Tennis Update, March 19

  2. The Quality of Your Thoughts

  3. Notice. Sherman County Court, Opportunities Analysis Meeting Quorum, March 20

  4. Sherman County 4-H Camp Wins Awards

  5. NOTICE OF ELECTION OF DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS, FILING DEADLINE, March 21

  6. Looking for a summer job? Cottonwood Canyon, Deschutes Recreation Area Positions


1. Sherman County High School Tennis Cancelled, March 19

LogoShermanCoSchoolThe tennis match at White Salmon on March 19 has been cancelled due to ongoing snow issues.

 

 

 


2. The Quality of Your Thoughts

Can the mind help cure disease? What role do the emotions play in preventing illness?

What is the relationship between the thoughts you think, the feelings you experience, and the overall health and well-being of your body? This is a very old question, but modern science has developed some innovative ways to determine the answers. And, while what they are finding may startle some people, it doesn’t come as a big surprise.

It turns out that improving the quality of your life lowers your chances of developing serious mental and physical illness and also improves the speed and likelihood of your recovery. And if you want to improve the quality of your life, you must start by improving the quality of your thinking.

You see, the quality of what happens to you in life – all of your accomplishments, all your behaviors and activities, all your relationships – are rooted in and based on what goes on in your mind. Your beliefs and expectations determine what you try or don’t try, how hard you try, and whether you give up or ultimately succeed.

Your thoughts about who you are and what you are like determine those with whom you associate, what you take into your body and how you care for yourself and others. So if you are interested in improving your likelihood of living a long and healthy life, take a long and careful look at your belief system and spend some time examining your thoughts and values, as well.

If you don’t like what you see, remember, you can change it. You have it within you. You always have. ~The Pacific Institute


3. Notice. Sherman County Court, Opportunities Analysis Meeting Quorum, March 20

ShermanCoLogoA quorum of the County Court may be present at the Opportunities Analysis meeting to be held on Wednesday March 20, 2019 at 630pm in the Burnet Building – 66365 Lonerock Road, Moro, OR. 97039. For questions please call Carrie Pipinich at 541-296-2266.


4. Sherman County 4-H Camp Wins Awards

4-H clover1Sherman County 4-H Camp won two awards at the recent Oregon State University Family Community Health conference held March 11-14 in Corvallis.  “Healthier Food on the Menu at Sherman 4-H Camp” was recognized for the Innovation in Programming Award and the Communications Awards for Educational Publication.  These awards were accepted by Sherman 4-H educator Cindy Brown on behalf of Program Secretary Sue Mabe, Camp Cook Shelly Bird, and herself.  This recognition was given to Sherman County 4-H Camp because of staff efforts to make the camp menu healthier by incorporating Oregon State University Food Hero healthy recipes into meals, and sending home a recipe booklet for families.

Cindy Brown, Educator

Oregon State University

OSU Extension Service – Sherman County

College of Public Health & Human Sciences

4-H Youth Development & SNAP-Ed

P: 541-565-3230 | C: 541-993-5291

extension.oregonstate.edu/sherman


5. NOTICE OF ELECTION OF DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS, FILING DEADLINE, March 21

Filing Deadline is 5:00pm Thursday, March 21, 2019

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 an election will be held in Sherman County, Oregon for the purpose of electing board members to fill the following positions and terms, including any vacancy which may exist on the boards of the following districts:

KENT WATER DISTRICT:
Position 3 – 4 Year Term
Position 5 – 4 Year Term

MORO RURAL FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT
Position 1 – 4 Year Term
Position 4 – 4 Year Term

NORTH CENTRAL EDUCATION SERVICE DISTRICT:
Zone 3 (Rufus & Wasco) – 4 Year Term
Zone 4 (Moro, Grass Valley & Kent) – 2 Year Term

NORTH SHERMAN COUNTY RURAL FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT:
Position 2 – 4 Year Term
Position 3 – 4 Year Term

SHERMAN COUNTY HEALTH DISTRICT:
Position 1 – 4 Year Term
Position 2 – 4 Year Term

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT:
Position 1 – 4 Year Term
Position 5 – 4 Year Term

SOUTH SHERMAN FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT:
Position 1 – 4 Year Term
Position 2 – 4 Year Term
Position 3 – 4 Year Term
Position 5 – 2 Year Term

This election will be conducted by mail. Each candidate for an office listed above must file a District Candidate Filing form (SEL 190) including a $10 filing fee, or file a District Candidate Filing form, Candidate Signature Sheet(s) Nonpartisan (SEL 121) with signatures of eligible Sherman County voters, and Petition Submission form (SEL 338) at the Sherman County Clerk’s Office no earlier than February 9, 2019 and no later than 5:00 p.m. on March 21, 2019. The Sherman County Courthouse is located at 500 Court Street in Moro, Oregon. If you have any questions, please contact the Clerk’s Office at 541-565-3606.


6. Looking for a summer job? Cottonwood Canyon, Deschutes Recreation Area Positions

Looking for a summer job? We have just that! Cottonwood Canyon State Park and Deschutes State Recreation Area are looking to hire multiple Park Ranger Assistants for the summer season.

Spring and summer in Oregon State Parks is the busiest time of the year, and park staff turn to their reliable Park Ranger Assistants for help. Ranger Assistants are the small-time heroes of any park operation. They use a varied skillset and a can-do attitude to get the job done, while at the same time learning valuable on-the-job skills from their Ranger peers. Please consider joining our group of dedicated, fun-loving people who are passionate about serving our visitors, protecting special places and providing great experiences.

As a Park Ranger Assistant, you will assist year-round State Park staff in the protection, maintenance, operation and repair of state park lands, natural and cultural resources, structures, facilities, equipment and systems. Park Ranger Assistants typically perform basic tasks in a single area of park operations (e.g.: janitorial work, landscape maintenance, interpretation or visitor services), although some positions will require performing tasks in a variety of areas. Some work may require the most elementary skills in building trades, including carpentry, electrical, plumbing, painting and landscape maintenance. In addition, specialized skills in basic park maintenance and operations may be required. Park Ranger Assistants, on a task specific basis, may guide the work of individuals or teams composed of volunteers, seasonal, and/or temporary state park employees.

For more information, and to apply, visit the Oregon State Parks hiring page.

Other open positions with Oregon State Parks can be found here.


 

Sherman County eNews #75

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County 4-H News: Sherman County Swine Club Report

  2. Moro Church Congratulates Emma Witherspoon

  3. Grass Valley’s Annual Easter Egg Hunt, April 13

  4. 80th OREGON LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY–2019 Regular Session Senate Bill 928

  5. From Won’t Power to Will Power

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

  7. Oregon’s state art collection featured on new Oregon Arts Commission website


1. Sherman County 4-H News: Sherman County Swine Club Report

4-H clover1The Sherman County Swine Club met on March 10, 2019 at the Sherman County Extension Office @ 5:00 P.M.   Attending were Dillan, T’Sharra, Coral, Addie, Bailey, Cadence, Savannah, Michael, Allison, Ellery, Austin and Quinton. Addie led the Pledge of Allegiance and T’Sharra led the 4-H pledge. During this meeting we played a game to get acquainted, we elected officers, talked about purchasing a pig, a pop quiz and how to care for pigs. We also talked about our presentations, club shirts and our record books. Our next meeting will be on Monday, April 1st at Brennah’s house and it will be at 6:00 PM. The meeting was adjourned at 6:00 PM. ~Signed: Bailey Coelsch


2. Moro Church Congratulates Emma Witherspoon

music-notesEmma Witherspoon was selected to participate in the All Northwest Wind Symphony which performed on February 17th at the Portland Convention Center in Portland, Oregon. Emma was encouraged to apply by her Sherman County High School band teacher, John Gronberg, by an on-line video audition. Participants were selected to join this elite and talented group of young artists.

Emma stated, “It was a privilege to be surrounded by others who have the same drive and passion that I have. We were able to make the music uniquely our own. The concert was by far my favorite personal event in which I’ve had the honor to participate.  I thank all the people who supported me, especially my family and friends.”

Emma is a valuable member of the Moro Presbyterian Church family and helps with many church activities. ~Submitted by Carol MacKenzie on behalf of the Moro Presbyterian Church.


3. Grass Valley’s Annual Easter Egg Hunt, April 13

EasterBasketBoy

Grass Valley’s Annual Easter Egg Hunt!

No charge!

Ages 0 – 12 (or 6th grade)

Saturday, April 13th – the week before Easter

10 a.m. at Grass Valley Park & Pavilion

Prize for each child, gold & silver egg prizes.

Coloring contest winners announcement.

10 a.m. – Egg Hunt Begins

10:20 (approximately) The Reptile Zone – Hands-on & Educational

Learn about the Reptiles

Made possible by a generous grant from Sherman County Cultural Coalition.

Please bring a lunch to eat while we are setting up for the Skate Party!

11:15 a.m. until 2 p.m. Skate Party, all ages welcome! Skates are available for use.

Questions? Please call Jeanne at 541-714-5740 or City of Grass Valley at 541-333-2434 (Mon-Wed 9-4)


4. 80th OREGON LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY–2019 Regular Session Senate Bill 928

Oregon.Flat.poleThis could be one of the most significant bills of the current session, especially if some version of the carbon reduction bill, HB 2020 passes. Governor Brown will introduce the bill on March 21st at Senate Environment and Energy Committee, 1 PM HR C.

See the entire bill at   https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2019R1/Downloads/MeasureDocument/SB928/Introduced

“Sponsored by COMMITTEE ON ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES

SUMMARY

The following summary is not prepared by the sponsors of the measure and is not a part of the body thereof subject to consideration by the Legislative Assembly. It is an editor’s brief statement of the essential features of the measure as introduced. Establishes Oregon Climate Authority. Establishes Oregon Climate Board. Transfers greenhouse gas reporting program from Department of Environmental Quality to Oregon Climate Authority. Abolishes State Department of Energy. Transfers duties, functions and powers of State Department of Energy related to issuance of loans for small scale local energy projects to Oregon Business Development Department. Transfers remaining duties, functions and powers of State Department of Energy to Oregon Climate Authority. Modifies permissible uses of energy supplier assessment. Abolishes Sustainability Board and Oregon Global Warming Commission. Establishes Energy Program Review Task Force. Becomes operative January 1, 2020. Declares emergency, effective on passage. A BILL FOR AN ACT Relating to the Oregon Climate Authority; creating new provisions; amending… … …”


5. From Won’t Power to Will Power

Has anyone ever called you stubborn? Would you describe yourself that way? If so, you may be in luck when it comes to making positive changes.

Some people find themselves in trouble a lot because of a personality characteristic that they call stubbornness. You have heard of “will power.” Well, stubbornness is a kind of “won’t power.” It causes you to dig in and refuse to budge, and sometimes it drives other people crazy. And sometimes, it keeps you from growing closer to the person you want to be.

But, as Roger and McWilliams pointed out in their book series, Life 101, “Just as fear is also excitement, stubbornness is also determination. It’s simply a matter of shifting the focus from ‘won’t power’ back to ‘will power.’ Rather than, ‘I won’t get fat,’ change it to ‘I will keep a healthy, slim body.’ Rather than, ‘I won’t be around people who don’t support my efforts,’ say ‘I will seek out people who help me do what I want to do in life.’

“It’s a matter of finding the positive opposite and focusing on that, rather than aligning yourself with a negative. Stubbornness, if you use it to advantage, will stand you in good stead when it comes to achieving your goals and living out your values.”

Imagine yourself stubbornly refusing to accept anything but the best in life. Imagine yourself stubbornly holding on to your program of self-improvement and personal growth no matter what. It’s locking on to what you want, and not locking on to what you don’t want. If you shift your energy from stubbornness to determination, you’ll be doing yourself a big favor.

You will also become a positive role model for those around you. So prepare yourself for an up-tic in your influence, because your positive stubbornness just may turn you into a sought-after mentor. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.Envelope80th OREGON LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY– Senate Bill 928

Five things I’ve learned about farmers and ranchers

representUs | End Corruption | Defend the Republic 

The State of Oregon Art Collection

State of Oregon Art Collection at Ft. Dalles Readiness Center

Uber, Lyft and oil frackers: Tech mirages, not real businesses

U.S. Energy Information Administration. Oil: Crude & Petroleum Products – Explained Use of Oil

Watch Your Language: Sweet p is silenced by Greeks


7. Oregon’s state art collection featured on new Oregon Arts Commission website

art.toolsOregon’s public collection of more than 2,400 artworks acquired and commissioned since 1975 is now featured on a searchable website for all to view. The State of Oregon Percent for Art Collection includes paintings, works on paper, photography, sculpture, ceramics, glass, mosaics, murals, textiles and both site-specific and structurally integrated art installations by over 800 artists. A number of commissioned temporary works can also be found on the website.

The artworks, installed across the state, can be found in public buildings from La Grande to Corvallis and Medford to Portland, including on campuses of higher education at University of Oregon, Portland State University, Oregon State University, Southern Oregon University, Eastern Oregon University, Western Oregon University and Oregon Institute of Technology.

The new online interface allows Oregonians or visitors to experience the state’s art collection remotely or to plan visits to view art in person. Robust search capabilities allow tailored searches—for a teacher creating class curriculum, a student doing research or a curious member of the public.

Highlights of the collection include:

  • Two- and three-dimensional works by seminal Oregon artists including Louis Bunce, Sally Haley, Manuel Izquierdo, George Johanson, James Lavadour and Lucinda Parker.
  • Temporary artworks, including “Information Studio” (2008) by Tahni Holt, an interactive dance installation created during a month-long residency at Portland State University. The site-specific work transformed a glass enclosed meeting room at the Smith Memorial Student Union into a stage where performers followed directions via headphones to realize Holt’s choreography.
  • Integrated works like Henk Pander’s “The Road” (2006), a largescale painting of an imagined traffic accident based on the artist’s experiences riding along with various Oregon police, sheriff and fire departments. The painting was commissioned for the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem.
  • Memorials, such as Lead Pencil Studio’s “OSH Patient Memorial” (2014) at the Oregon State Hospital in Salem, which respectfully commemorates more than 3,400 individuals who passed away in Oregon state institutions from 1913 to 1970. The memorial includes a building displaying the historical metal canisters that held the ashes of individuals not claimed by family members. Facing this, a columbarium wall holds newly created ceramic urns with the inscribed names and living dates of the remains represented within.
  • Recent commissions include “Lessons from a Falling Star” (2018) by Garrick Imatani, installed at the University of Oregon. This project traces the legacy of “Tomanowas” (The Willamette Meteorite), which came to Oregon via the Missoula Floods approximately 15,000 years ago. The artist worked with the Clackamas tribe (part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde), who consider “Tomanowas” a sacred object, to 3D scan the meteorite and photograph current tribe members with a 3D printed replica in response to archival images showing the meteorite as discovered. A second aluminum replica of the meteorite is suspended in the atrium of Straub Hall in front of a mural showing water levels during the Missoula Floods.

Oregon was one of the first states in the nation to pass Percent for Art legislation, setting aside no less than 1 percent of funds for the acquisition of public-facing artwork in all state building construction projects with budgets over $100,000. Since 1975, the Percent for Art program has placed high-quality, accessible and mostly permanent art in public places. Over 275 state construction projects have qualified for Percent for Art funds and more than 2,000 Oregonians have taken part in the selection of artwork for their state’s higher education campuses and government facilities. The program, managed by the Oregon Arts Commission, remains dedicated to the enhancement of public environments and the improvement of the character and quality of state buildings.

Link to State of Oregon Percent for Art Collection websitehttp://state-of-oregon-art-collection.org/final/Portal.aspx


 

Sherman County eNews #74

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Emergency Services Activity Reports

  2. Community Representative Sought for Sherman County Public/School Library Board

  3. Public Notice. Sherman County Public/School Library Board Meeting, March 19

  4. Public Notice. Watershed Program Assistant Position Open

  5. Resource Education & Agricultural Leadership (REAL) Program

  6. Sound character begins with keen self-respect.

  7. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week in Salem, by the numbers


1. Sherman County Emergency Services Activity Reports

~Shawn Payne, Sherman County Emergency Services

Sherman County Ambulance

February 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
2/03 1:40 AM Motor Vehicle Crash-LE Standby Rufus
2/06 6:10 PM Chest Pain Grass Valley
2/07 2:05 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP#99
2/08 2:14 PM Chest Pain Moro
2/11 3:29 AM Weak and Dizzy Grass Valley
2/11 4:23 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 110
2/11 5:07 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 107
2/11 8:32 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 114
2/11 8:48 PM Sick Person Pilot in Biggs
2/12 12:21 PM Weak Moro
2/12 4:36 PM Unknown Illness Grass Valley
2/13 9:38 PM Possible Stroke Wasco
2/14 12:04 AM Semi-Truck Rollover US 97  MP# 42.5
2/15 9:50 PM Semi-Truck Rollover US 97  MP# 42.5
2/16 8:06 PM Fall Injury/Difficulty Breathing Grass Valley
2/20 7:40 PM Breathing Problem Wasco
2/21 7:26 PM Possible Poisoning I-84  MP# 104
2/25 7:17 AM Motor Vehicle Crash – Rollover I-84  MP# 114
2/25 9:27 AM Sick Person Moro
2/25 8:26 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP#99
2/26 10:11 AM Fall Injury Rufus
2/26 5:03 PM Motor Vehicle Crash – Rollover US 97  MP# 41
2/27 5:38 PM Semi  Rollover US 97  MP# 33

Moro Fire Department

February 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
2/26 5:03 PM Motor Vehicle Crash – Rollover US 97  MP# 41

North Sherman County RFPD

January 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
1-02 12:37 PM Medical Assist Rufus
1-10 2:57 PM Medical Assist Wasco
1-16 8:52 AM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 9
1-16 9:37 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 104
1-16 10:15 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 105
1-16 10:17 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 103
1-18 6:46 AM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 102
1-26 10:18 AM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 109
1-27 9:58 AM Medical Assist Wasco

February 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
2-03 1:40 PM Law Enforcement Assist I-84  Rufus Area
2-07 2:05 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 99
2-11 4:19 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 110
2-11 5:05 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 97
2-11 6:22 PM Medical Assist Wasco
2-11 8:41 PM Medical Assist Biggs at Pilot
2-11 8:48 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 114
2-20 7:40 PM Medical Assist Wasco
2-21 7:25 PM Medical Assist Biggs Junction on ramp
2-25 7:19 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 100

2. Community Representative Sought for Sherman Public/School Library Board

Sherman County Public/School Library has a Board position open for a community representative. The mission of SCP/SL is to provide access to informational materials, technologies, and programs for all residents of the community, birth through senior citizens. Meetings are bi-monthly. Anyone interested in serving on the Library Board may pick up an application at the library, e-mail shermanlibrary@sherman.k12.or.us, or call 541-565-3279.


3. Public Notice. Sherman County Public/School Library Board Meeting, March 19

The Sherman County Public/School Library will be holding a regular board meeting on Tuesday, March 19 at 6:00 p.m.


4. Public Notice. Watershed Program Assistant Position Open

APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED for a full time Watershed Program Assistant at the Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District in Moro, Oregon. Benefits included, pay DOE. Duties include assisting the execution of day to day management, outreach, education, and administrative tasks for the Sherman County SWCD and Watershed Council. The Program Assistant will provide support for the SWCD and Watershed Council meetings, grant submittals and tracking, project implementation and NRCS Farm Bill support. Send cover letter and resume to Sherman County SWCD, 302 Scott Street, Moro, Oregon 97039, or email amanda.whitman@or.nacdnet.net. For more information, call (541) 565-3216 ext. 109. Applications will be accepted until position is filled. Full job description and application instructions can be found at http://www.shermancountyswcd.com. The SWCD is an equal opportunity employer and service provider.


5. Resource Education & Agricultural Leadership (REAL) Program

What is REAL OREGON?  Resource Education & Agricultural Leadership Program

Oregon is a diverse state with many industries based in natural resource use and development.

REAL OREGON is a leadership program that brings future leaders from agriculture, fishing, and forestry together to learn leadership skills and gain a greater understanding of Oregon through a series of statewide sessions.

REAL Oregon is an annual leadership development program that exposes a cross- section of representatives from Oregon’s natural resources community to the diversity of Oregon’s geography, economy and cultures through training in:

  • Board governance
  • Communication skills
  • Strategic planning
  • Conflict resolution
  • Government interaction and public policy
  • Media relations
  • Natural resource industries co-existence
  • Professional presentation
  • Public speaking
  • Strength assessment
  • Urban-rural relationship building

Class members visit five different locations across the state to gain leadership skills and gain an in-depth understanding of the agriculture and natural resource sectors that define Oregon’s economy.

REAL Oregon begins in November and concludes in March the following year, with the leadership group meeting one time per month. Class members will spend approximately 2.5 days in each of these locations.

Agricultural and natural resource producers and allied industry members are encouraged to apply. Class size is limited to 30 participants.  Applications are available herehttp://realoregon.net/about-us/.


6. Sound character begins with keen self-respect.

No one really knows for sure how we develop self-respect, but the experts believe it begins at a very early age. Parents who show their children that they love them unconditionally — just because they are who they are — build a foundation of healthy self-respect that will sustain the children for the rest of their lives. From this foundation comes the moral and ethical structure known as character. Healthy self-respect should not be confused with egotism. An egotist loves himself for the most superficial of reasons, while a self-respecting person takes pride in qualities of character that he or she has worked hard to develop. ~The Napoleon Hill Foundation


7. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week in Salem, by the numbers

Oregon.Beaver~ http://oregoncapitalinsider.com/

Here are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon political stories.

50-44: Final score in Wednesday’s basketball game between the House and Senate. The House won.

34.3: Percent of Oregon millennials who have a college or advanced degree, according to Willamette Week.

43: Percent of Oregon millennials who moved from other states who have a college or advanced degree.

30: Percent of Oregon millennials born here.

1,500: Refugees who moved to Oregon in 2015, according to OPB.

$4.5 million: Amount in extra funding the Legislature might provide to support refugees who settle in Oregon, OPB reports.

14: Calls that a state hotline set up to take reports of workplace violations from strippers received over the course of three years, according to Willamette Week.

75: Years old Smokey Bear will turn this August 9.

08/01/19: Day the Oregon DMV will start issuing Smokey Bear “Keep Oregon Green” license plates, according to KMTR.

38: Members of Gov. Kate Brown’s new Wildfire Council, including ex officio members. The council’s first meeting is March 18.


 

Sherman County eNews #73

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

church.family1Envy Destroys

My wife and I were away the first part of the week at an conference in association with the Kent and Grass Valley churches. At one of the sessions the keynote speaker addressed issues that get in the way of connectedness in partnerships and relationships.

In doing this he pointed to envy that he felt was the greatest hurdle. Looking at this he went to a relationship that I touched on in the last post that of Jonathan and David as well as Jonathan’s father King Saul. Last time we looked at the positives in the relationship. Here we are looking at the negative.

David had been engaged in battle on behalf of King Saul and met with great success. In response the people began to sing his praise. We read in 1 Samuel 18:8-9, “Then Saul became very angry, for this saying displeased him; and he said, “They have ascribed to David ten thousands, but to me they have ascribed thousands. Now what more can he have but the kingdom?” Saul looked at David with suspicion from that day on.” (1 Samuel 18:8–9, NASB95) We see in this account that Saul hear the comparison and it weighed heavy on him. He desired to have the glory given to David for himself, and from that point forward he viewed David with resentment.

Envy is said to be a green monster. We see in this record and what followed that it began to consume Saul and he spent an exhaustive amount of time trying to bring David down so that he might have that recognition for himself. It robbed him of joy as it festered in him and consumed his thoughts and energies, even leading to his destruction. In contrast to this his own son Jonathan chose to lay aside his own glory in lieu of the one that God had raised, and rather than being consumed by what he did not have he chose to giving, sacrifice and love. He chose freedom over bondage.

Joe Burgess
Pastor, Kent Baptist Church


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)  

eNEWS POLICIES:

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.

Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

JOYFUL NEWS!  

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

“Volunteering is the ultimate exercise in democracy. You vote in elections once a year, but when you volunteer, you vote every day about the kind of community you want to live in.” — unknown

SHERMAN COUNTY REPRESENTATIVE for COMMUNITY ACTION COUNCIL. Mid-Columbia Community Action Council is a non-profit organization that works with low-income families and we are looking for a person from Sherman County to serve on our Board of Directors. We would like to have someone from Sherman County who represents a group or organization, but does not have to. The Board meetings are held every other month in The Dalles and usually last about an hour and a half. Would you be interested in helping your community, then contact Jim at MCCAC and he can fill you in on more details. 541-298-5131 or js@mccac.com

YOUR STORIES for SHERMAN COUNTY: FOR THE RECORD. The Sherman County Historical Society invites you to share your Sherman County stories or records. Contact the Sherman County Historical Society, P.O. Box 173, Moro, Oregon 97039 or contact editor Gladys Wesley at 541-565-3232. Information from diaries, letters, autograph albums, records and stories are welcome!  Consider recording your interviews of local story tellers – ask what they know or heard tell of brick yards, rodeos, movie theaters, the Grant-Maryhill ferry, fishing on the rivers or county events. Develop a short story around a series of photographs of a family, athletic or community event. See a content summary for Sherman County: For The Record 1983-2018: https://www.shermanmuseum.org/publications-for-the-record/  or http://shermancountyoregon.com/sherman-county/sherman-county-for-the-record/

EMPLOYMENT: 

CLEANING SERVICE. Sherman County is requesting proposals to provide cleaning services for 5 hours/week at the Senior and Community Center located in Moro, OR. Cleaning products and basic equipment will be supplied. Cleaning schedule will be flexible but developed based on the monthly activity calendar for the facility. Proposals with a resume and a letter of interest will be accepted until 5pm on March 27th and may be sent to Kari Silcox at the Sherman County Senior & Community Center PO Box 352 Moro, OR 97039, kari@shermancounty.net, 541-565-3191.  3/22 

CITY WATER OPERATOR/MAINTENANCE. The City of Grass Valley is seeking applicants to fill the position of: WATER OPERATOR/MAINTENANCE. Applicant is responsible for maintaining and operation of the public water system according to the City Council and according to all Oregon Health Division requirements. This position is also responsible for all maintenance on all city owned properties and/or property in the care of the City. For a full job description, please contact City Hall. City of Grass Valley is an EOE; Salary is DOE; part-time, no benefits. If interested in this position, please return a Letter of Interest, resumé and three references to City Administrator, Whitney Cabral or Mayor Pattee by March 15, 2019. Letters and information can be dropped off at City Hall, e-mailed to  cityofgv@embarqmail.com  or mailed to: PO Box 191, Grass Valley, OR 97029. Position open until filled. Please contact City Hall with any questions at 541-333-2434. 3/15

HELP GILLIAM AND SHERMAN COUNTY STUDENTS SUCCEED

Do you know someone with time to spare, who loves to drive, and help others? Refer them to Mid Columbia Bus Company! Once the person you refer becomes certified and drives a full route for at least 30 days, we will donate $1000.00 to a school organization of your choice.  What we offer: $13.30 an hour, Paid training, Flexible schedule, Dental, Vision, Medical Plan, 401 K… And more! Qualifications: Pass a criminal history check, Have a good driving record, Have a valid Oregon driver’s license, Ability to obtain Class B CDL with training. Contact Mid Columbia Bus Company and tell us where to make a donation today: ~Amberlena Shaffer, Recruiter, OFFICE: (541) 567-0551, CELL: (541) 303-5093, Email: amberlena@MidCoBus.com, www.MidCoBus.com   4/26

GRAIN OPERATIONS LABORER. MCP is seeking two applicants to join our team as a Grain Operations Laborer. This full-time position will be based in either Sherman, Gilliam or Wasco County. As a Grain Ops Laborer you will have the opportunity to perform a wide variety of jobs within the department. Including but not limited to maintenance, housekeeping, inventory management and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility. Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. 3/15

SALES & MARKETING REPRESENTATIVE. MCP is hiring a regional Sales and Marketing Representative. We are looking for an individual to service our customers in the Eastern Oregon region. As a Sales and Marketing Representative, you will solicit new prospects, sell products and services, and assist existing clients as necessary. The ideal candidate will have a strong working knowledge in one or more of these areas: Cardlock, Bulk Lube products, Grain Origination as well as Sales and Marketing. Applications are available for download in the career opportunities section of our website www.mcpcoop.com or contact Human Resources at 541-565-2277.  3/15

OREGON RACEWAY PARK COURSE MARSHAL, SECURITY, WORK STAFF. Watch the races and get paid for it too. ORP has a wide variety of openings for the 2019 season! Course Marshal: Candidates must be 18 years of age, able to climb ladders, have the ability to be outdoors (sometimes in harsh conditions), have good verbal communication skills and be able to react calmly and quickly to emergency situations.  Security: Crowd control, have guests sign liability release waiver and issue a colored wrist band as they arrive and enter ORP premises. Day and night shift available. Working Personnel: This is for all other duties that need to be done at ORP on a regular basis.  Orientation Day: Is held March 16, 2019 from 9am-5pm at 93811 Blagg Lane, Grass Valley, OR 97029. If interested in any of the positions please contact Brenda Pikl: 541-333-2452 email: info@oregonraceway.com  3/15

SERVICES:

LOCAL HANDYMAN’S SERVICES. Handyman, General Contractor & Equipment Operator. Large and small projects, indoors or out. Please call Kevin at 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 3/15 

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE:

GRASS VALLEY LOT. Grass Valley lot for sale. $50,000. 1.43 acres within city limits. Zoned residential/farming. All new utilities in place (septic system, underground electric and water lines from city meter). Ready to build or place manufactured home. Please contact Margaret at 503-349-8158 for additional information.

VEHICLES. Public Auction. Trans-Tow Towing will hold a Public Auction on Saturday, March 16, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. Viewing of these vehicles will be available the morning of the Auction beginning at 9:00 a.m. | 1997 Geo Metro, 1996 Chevrolet GMT-400, 1999 Hyundai Sonata, 2006 Honda Civic, 2003 Honda Odyssey, 2001 Olds Alero, 2003 Ford Explorer. The Auction will be held at 1007 1st Street in Moro. If you would like more information, please contact us at 541-565-3005.

HANDCRAFTED FURNITURE & GIFTS. Considerately handcrafted one-of-a-kind indoor and outdoor furniture and gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels, old barn wood and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders available.  ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com | Facebook | 3/15

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

 SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

FOR RENT OR LEASE:  

FREE:

LOST OR FOUND: 

WANTED: 

HOST FAMILY. Host a Foreign Exchange Student. ASSE Student Exchange Programs is now looking for American families to host high school students from Asia. These personable and academically select exchange students speak English, are bright, curious, and eager to learn about this country through living as part of a family for an academic year and attending high school. Your support of these students reinforces the United States’ commitment to education and opportunity throughout the world. | ASSE is currently seeking host families for these well-qualified, bright, motivated and well-screened students coming from Japan, China, Thailand, Taiwan, Mongolia, and South Korea. By living with local host families and attending local high schools, the students acquire an understanding of American values and build on leadership skills. | The exchange students arrive from their home country shortly before school begins and return at the end of the school year. Each ASSE student is fully insured, brings his or her own personal spending money and expects to bear his or her share of household responsibilities, as well as being included in normal family activities and lifestyles. At the same time the student will be teaching their newly adopted host family about their own culture and language.   If you are interested in opening your home and sharing your family life with a young person from abroad, please contact us today for more information, call (800) 733-2773, go online at www.ASSEhosts.com or email asseusawest@asse.com  4/26


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

clover4MARCH

15 Maryhill Museum of Art Opens for the Season

15 Sherman County School – Missoula Children’s Theatre 7 Cafeteria

16 Sherman County School – Missoula Children’s Theatre 3 Cafeteria

16 Trans-Tow Towing Public Auction 10 Moro

17 ST. PATRICK’S DAY

19 Wasco City Council 7

19 Unit 20 Oregon Retired Educators’ Meeting 12 Hood River Valley Adult Center

19 Sherman County Public/School Library Board Meeting 6

20 Biggs Service District Public Meeting 8:30 Sherman County Courthouse

20 Sherman County Court 9

23 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Tree & Shrub Sale 8-12 Moro

23-31 Spring Whale Watch 10-4 Depoe Bay

25 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Building Moro

25-29 Sherman County School Spring Break

27 Sherman County SWCD & Watershed Council Annual Meeting 5:30

27-28 Roots of Resilience Grazing Conference, Pendleton

27-April 3, 10, 17 & 14 Still Life Painting Class – Maryhill Museum of Art

28 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board 4 Hood River 

flowers.daffodilAPRIL

1 Grass Valley City Council 7

2 Moro City Council 7

2-3 Oregon Wheat Day Events at the Capitol

3 Sherman County Court 9

3 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Church of Christ social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

4 Sherman County Fair Board 7

6 Equine Mania LLC Advanced Sorting Clinic w/Kristi Siebert (541) 980-7394

6 Great Electrifying Event at Bonneville Lock and Dam 10-3

6-7 Spring Farming Days & Ag Museum, Pomeroy, Washington

7 Kent Baptist Church & Mud Springs Gospel Band 6 Kent

9 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

9 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

10 Sherman Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

10 Rufus City Council 7

10-11 Sherman County Budget Committee Meeting

12 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 PALM SUNDAY

16 Frontier Regional 911 Board of Directors Meeting 1:30

16 Tri-County Community Corrections Board 3:30 Gilliam County

16 Wasco City Council 7

17 Sherman County Court 9

19 Frontier TeleNet Board Meeting TBA

19 GOOD FRIDAY

21 EASTER SUNDAY

24 Tri-County Courts 10-2 Sherman County Courthouse

26 N. Central Livestock Assoc. Bull Tour to Gilliam County starts 9 Wasco School


 

Sherman County eNews #72

CONTENTS

The Missoula Children’s Theatre Presents “Peter & Wendy”- March 15 & 16

Beware of Universals

Wasco County Pioneer Association Annual Meeting, May 4

Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Opinion. Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction


1. The Missoula Children’s Theatre Presents “Peter & Wendy”- March 15 & 16

The Missoula Children’s Theatre performances of “Peter and Wendy” will be held on Friday, March 15th at 7:00pm and Saturday, March 16th at 3:00 pm and will be presented in the cafeteria at Sherman County School.  We have 55 of our k-12th grade students performing in this production. These students have put in many hours of work on this production this week.  Please come and support our kids.

The Missoula Children’s Theatre is a non-profit organization based in Missoula, Montana.  This coming year more than 65,000 cast members across the globe will take to the stage to the delight and applause of their families, friends, community, neighbors and teachers!


2. Beware of Universals

One of the most important ways we communicate is with language. However, if our language is fuzzy, our communications will be too. And when communications are fuzzy, misunderstandings abound.

If you want to communicate effectively, you’ll also want to make your language as effective and clear as it can be. One way to do this is to be very careful about using words known as “universals” or “absolutes” – words like “always,” “never,” “all” and “every.”

Now, universals are fine, when they’re true. If you say, “Everyone must die someday,” or “All the people in our family have brown eyes,” you are talking about facts. But what about when you see an old person struggling with a walker and you say, “Gosh, it’s awful to be old!” Or you read about an elected official who’s been convicted of fraud and you say, “Politicians are all crooked.” In both cases, you have moved from a specific truth to a general untruth. You have generalized from particulars, and in so doing you distort a fact that is true, into an opinion that isn’t.

So, the next time you hear a universal term, ask yourself, “Is this a fact or an opinion or a generalization?” Watch and listen closely to those running for office, especially when they talk about their opponents or the state of affairs. Are they stating facts or a cleverly worded opinion? The same goes for news outlets or anyone attempting to grab the spotlight. It is vital that all of us sharpen our critical listening skills.

Listen for the words “all,” “every,” “always,” “never,” and “none,” and let them serve as red flags for you. Ask yourself, “Is this strictly true? Are there exceptions?” If you avoid these universals except when they are really true, you will dramatically improve your communications, as well as create a better sense of trust in you by those who listen to you. ~The Pacific Institute


3. Wasco County Pioneer Association Annual Meeting, May 4

wheel.wagon1The Annual Meeting of the Wasco County Pioneer Association will be held on Saturday, May 4, 2019.

The Meeting will be held at:
The Fort Dalles Readiness Center
402 East Scenic The Dalles, Oregon 97058
on the Columbia Gorge Community College Campus (East of Sorosis Park).

Doors are open and Registration begins at 9:30
Come early so that you can view the Historic Picture Boards
Lunch is at 11:30am
Annual Meeting and Program to follow lunch at 1:00pm
Annual Dues: $12.50
Lunch is $15.00
The Public is welcome at this meeting.

The Oregon Territorial Legislature created Old Wasco County on January 11, 1854. The Dalles was designated the county seat with the creation of the county, and has been its only location. At the time of its creation old Wasco County was the largest county in the United States, consisting of 130,000 square miles that stretched from the Cascades to the Rocky Mountains.

When Dakota Territory (including present-day Wyoming) was created in 1861, Idaho Territory in 1863, and Montana Territory in 1864, the parts of Old Wasco County east of the present Oregon boundaries were ceded to those territories.  Other counties were formed – Baker in 1862, Umatilla in 1862, Grant in 1864, Lake in 1874, Crook in 1882, Morrow in 1884, Gilliam in 1885, Sherman in 1889, Hood River in 1908 and Jefferson in 1914.

The Wasco County Pioneer Association Celebrates Old Wasco County every year on the first Saturday of May!


4. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

cow.blueOpinion. Cows are not the enemy.

Rural Population Trends

Grocery Store Prices Rose for the First Time in 3 Years in 2018

No-till and Strip-till Are Widely Adopted but Often Used in Rotation With Other Tillage Practices 

Commentary. Give the border patrol a break.

Study reveals 5 biggest regrets people have before they die

Oregon Now Has A 2nd Measles Outbreak To Deal With


5. Opinion. Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction

Cal Thomas, The Patriot Post: “For young people who weren’t alive during the Cold War and the horrors that came from socialism and its evil twin, communism, the notion that they can get free stuff from the government is addictive. Having sacrificed little for their country (members of the military excluded), too many young people have bought into the idea that rich people and big corporations are evil because they have ‘stolen’ money from others, especially the poor. … Ironically, one of the top issues for Generation Z is the national debt, now at $22 trillion. Have young people considered that socialist programs will significantly add to the debt? Apparently not, because to them, it seems that feelings are more important than observable results. … Ronald Reagan said: ‘Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same.’ Will this be the generation that fulfills his prophecy? Much is riding on the 2020 election.”