Sherman County eNews #81

CONTENT

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


 1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)  

newspaper-arroweNEWS POLICIES:

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.   Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers. 

NEWS RELEASES. Please submit event and information news, meeting notices and calendar dates by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, how & why with contact or source information. As appropriate, follow up with news of event results. Links are welcome. No posters or flyers. Keep it relevant, no longer than 350 words. 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. We encourage letters to the Editor that focus on ideas and opinions about public issues and events rather than personalities or private matters. We reserve the right to change policies at any time and to reject or edit any Letter to the Editor.

  • Keep it short, no longer than 350 words.
  • Keep it simple with one or two clear points. No attachments.
  • Keep it fresh with no more than one letter per writer per month.
  • Keep it civilized, in good taste and free from libel.
  • Keep it relevant; focus on a local event, previous letter or issues of general concern – not personalities.
  • Letters must be signed, name and town. Anonymous letters will not be posted.
  • Please submit Letters to the Editor by using the Submit News page.

 THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

 JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

Volunteer Smile “Volunteerism is the answering of a calling, an inner drive to be part of something great to bring something good to the world through some gesture, great or small.” ~Lions Club Thessaloniki Heraklea

 

SHERMAN COUNTY PUBLIC/SCHOOL LIBRARY BOARD POSITION. Sherman County Public/School Library has a Board position open for a community representative. The mission of SCP/SL is to provide access to informational materials, technologies, and programs for all residents of the community, birth through senior citizens. Meetings are bi-monthly. Anyone interested in serving on the Library Board may pick up an application at the library, e-mail shermanlibrary@sherman.k12.or.us, or call 541-565-3279.   4/12

SEEKING INTERIOR COURTHOUSE PHOTOGRAPHS 1899-1930. In search of pictures taken inside of the original Sherman County Courthouse, during and shortly after construction, dating between 1899-1930. Any help locating pictures would be sincerely appreciated. Please contact Ross Turney at 541-565-3505 or at turneyr@shermancounty.net with any information. – Lee Langston, Community Member

SHERMAN COUNTY REPRESENTATIVE for COMMUNITY ACTION COUNCIL. Mid-Columbia Community Action Council is a non-profit organization that works with low-income families and we are looking for a person from Sherman County to serve on our Board of Directors. We would like to have someone from Sherman County who represents a group or organization, but does not have to. The Board meetings are held every other month in The Dalles and usually last about an hour and a half. Would you be interested in helping your community, then contact Jim at MCCAC and he can fill you in on more details. 541-298-5131 or js@mccac.com

YOUR STORIES for SHERMAN COUNTY: FOR THE RECORD. The Sherman County Historical Society invites you to share your Sherman County stories or records. Contact the Sherman County Historical Society, P.O. Box 173, Moro, Oregon 97039 or contact editor Gladys Wesley at 541-565-3232. Information from diaries, letters, autograph albums, records and stories are welcome!  See a content summary for Sherman County: For The Record 1983-2018: https://www.shermanmuseum.org/publications-for-the-record/  or http://shermancountyoregon.com/sherman-county/sherman-county-for-the-record/

EMPLOYMENT:

ASSISTANT CHILD CARE PROVIDER: Part-time position available at ABC Huskies Child Care in Wasco. Experience preferred but will train. Must be a team player, child oriented and able to work flexible hours. For application and further details: 541-442-5024, email abchuskies@yahoo.com.  Employment Application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com. 4/12

 WATERSHED PROGRAM ASSISTANT. Applications are now being accepted for a full time Watershed Program Assistant at the Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District in Moro, Oregon. Benefits included, pay DOE. Duties include assisting the execution of day to day management, outreach, education, and administrative tasks for the Sherman County SWCD and Watershed Council. The Program Assistant will provide support for the SWCD and Watershed Council meetings, grant submittals and tracking, project implementation and NRCS Farm Bill support. Send cover letter and resume to Sherman County SWCD, 302 Scott Street, Moro, Oregon 97039, or email amanda.whitman@or.nacdnet.net.  For more information, call (541) 565-3216 ext. 109. Applications will be accepted until position is filled. Full job description and application instructions can be found at http://www.shermancountyswcd.com.  The SWCD is an equal opportunity employer and service provider. 4/12

FARM SERVICE AGENCY PROGRAM TECHNICIAN. The Gilliam-Wheeler County Farm Service Agency (FSA) is accepting applications for a permanent, full-time Program Technician in Condon, Oregon. Applications will be accepted beginning Thursday, March 21 and closing Wednesday, April 3rd. Salary range of $26,587 – $53,773 per year based on qualifications and experience. Responsibilities include: Carrying out office activities and functions pertaining to one or more of the program areas administered in the county, interpreting and explaining procedures, program regulations and forms to producers and other agency personnel, utilizing various web-based software applications to maintain producer data and processing automated forms, using a high degree of initiative and judgment in planning and carrying out assigned tasks and resolving problems encountered. A copy of the vacancy announcement and application may be obtained online by visiting: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/527939800.  For more information, please contact the Oregon FSA State Admin Specialist Martin Nguyen at 503-404-1127 or email at martin.nguyen@or.usda.gov3/29

CLEANING SERVICE. Sherman County is requesting proposals to provide cleaning services for 5 hours/week at the Senior and Community Center located in Moro, OR. Cleaning products and basic equipment will be supplied. Cleaning schedule will be flexible but developed based on the monthly activity calendar for the facility. Proposals with a resume and a letter of interest will be accepted until 5pm on March 27th and may be sent to Kari Silcox at the Sherman County Senior & Community Center PO Box 352 Moro, OR 97039, kari@shermancounty.net, 541-565-3191.  3/22 

HELP GILLIAM AND SHERMAN COUNTY STUDENTS SUCCEED. Do you know someone with time to spare, who loves to drive, and help others? Refer them to Mid Columbia Bus Company! Once the person you refer becomes certified and drives a full route for at least 30 days, we will donate $1000.00 to a school organization of your choice. What we offer: $13.30 an hour, Paid training, Flexible schedule, Dental, Vision, Medical Plan, 401 K … And more! Qualifications: Pass a criminal history check, Have a good driving record, Have a valid Oregon driver’s license, Ability to obtain Class B CDL with training. Contact Mid Columbia Bus Company and tell us where to make a donation today: ~Amberlena Shaffer, RecruiterOFFICE: (541) 567-0551CELL: (541) 303-5093Email: amberlena@MidCoBus.com www.MidCoBus.com   4/26

SERVICES:

SHERMAN COUNTY PRESCHOOL OPEN ENROLLMENT. Sherman County Preschool is looking ahead to next school year.  We will be holding an open enrollment at 6pm on April 5th in the preschool.  We encourage anyone interested in their child attending preschool to complete an enrollment packet.  Space is limited to 20 children and Head Start spots are limited as well.  To be eligible for the 2019-2020 preschool year your child must be 3-5 years of age on or before September 1st, 2019 and be potty trained.  We contract with both North Central ESD and Umatilla Morrow Head Starts to provide Head Start services to qualifying families.  They are both wonderful agencies with great employees who love to help kids and their families, but again spots are limited so you don’t want to miss out on signing up.  Most, if not all, spots will be filled by early summer. Sherman Co. Preschool is a QRIS 5-star program with a Director (Carrie Somnis) & 3 Teachers (Brenda Massie, Sarah Goodenough & Miranda Owens) who love children and have over 30+ years of combined teaching experience.  Sherman Co. Preschool is located in Moro in the elementary wing of the Sherman County School.  We introduce preschoolers to learning in a warm and caring environment that encourages children to learn through play and structured small group activities.  We offer transportation services in the afternoon with stops in Moro and Wasco at each daycare.  If you are unable to make the open enrollment but are interested in your child attending preschool next year please send an email to shermanpreschool@yahoo.com with your name, mailing address, and child’s age/name as of September 1st, 2019.  Feel free to call the preschool directly with any questions.  The phone number is (541) 565-3320, hours are 7:30am-2pm Monday-Thursday.  During preschool hours (8am-12pm) we are busy with kids & may not answer, but please leave a message and someone will return your call as soon as possible. 4/5

LOCAL GENERAL CONTRACTOR, HANDYMAN & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Ready for spring projects, large and small, indoors or out. Please call Kevin at 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 4/24

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE:

HANDCRAFTED INDOOR & OUTDOOR FURNITURE. Considerately handcrafted one-of-a-kind indoor and outdoor furniture and gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels, old barn wood and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders accepted. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com | Facebook | 5/17

GRASS VALLEY LOT. Grass Valley lot for sale. $50,000. 1.43 acres within city limits. Zoned residential/farming. All new utilities in place (septic system, underground electric and water lines from city meter). Ready to build or place manufactured home. Please contact Margaret at 503-349-8158 for additional information. 3/22

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY   https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

 FOR RENT OR LEASE:

 FREE:

 LOST OR FOUND:

newspaper-wantedWANTED:

 SEEKING INTERIOR COURTHOUSE PHOTOGRAPHS 1899-1930. In search of pictures taken inside of the original Sherman County Courthouse, during and shortly after construction, dating between 1899-1930. Any help locating pictures would be sincerely appreciated. Please contact Ross Turney at 541-565-3505 or at turneyr@shermancounty.net with any information. – Lee Langston, Community Member

HOST FAMILY. Host a Foreign Exchange Student. ASSE Student Exchange Programs is now looking for American families to host high school students from Asia. These personable and academically select exchange students speak English, are bright, curious, and eager to learn about this country through living as part of a family for an academic year and attending high school. Your support of these students reinforces the United States’ commitment to education and opportunity throughout the world.  ASSE is currently seeking host families for these well-qualified, bright, motivated and well-screened students coming from Japan, China, Thailand, Taiwan, Mongolia, and South Korea. By living with local host families and attending local high schools, the students acquire an understanding of American values and build on leadership skills.  The exchange students arrive from their home country shortly before school begins and return at the end of the school year. Each ASSE student is fully insured, brings his or her own personal spending money and expects to bear his or her share of household responsibilities, as well as being included in normal family activities and lifestyles. At the same time the student will be teaching their newly adopted host family about their own culture and language.   If you are interested in opening your home and sharing your family life with a young person from abroad, please contact us today for more information, call (800) 733-2773, go online at www.ASSEhosts.com or email asseusawest@asse.com  4/26


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html 

Sun-Symbol-YellowMARCH

23-31 Spring Whale Watch 10-4 Depoe Bay

25 Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors 10 Sherman County Courthouse

25 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Building Moro

25-29 Sherman County School Spring Break

27 Sherman County SWCD & Watershed Council Annual Meeting 5:30

27-28 Roots of Resilience Grazing Conference, Pendleton

27-April 3, 10, 17 & 14 Still Life Painting Class – Maryhill Museum of Art

28 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board 4 Hood River

31 Congressman Walden’s Town Hall, Anderson Building 11 Condon

31 Congressman Walden’s Town Hall, Wasco School Events Center 2:30 Wasco

starCircleAPRIL

1 Grass Valley City Council 7

2 Moro City Council 7

2-3 Oregon Wheat Day Events at the Capitol

3 Sherman County Court 9

3 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Church of Christ social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

4 Sherman County Fair Board 7

5 Sherman County Preschool Open Enrollment 5:30 Preschool

6 Equine Mania LLC Advanced Sorting Clinic w/Kristi Siebert (541) 980-7394

6 Great Electrifying Event at Bonneville Lock and Dam 10-3

6-7 Spring Farming Days & Ag Museum, Pomeroy, Washington

7 Kent Baptist Church & Mud Springs Gospel Band 6 Kent

9 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

9 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

10 Sherman Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

10 Rufus City Council 7

10-11 Sherman County Budget Committee Meeting

12 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

13 Grass Valley’s Annual Egg Hunt, Reptile Zone & Skate Party 10 Pavilion

14 Wasco County Historical Society Benefit 40-mile long Poker Run 541-980-0918

14 PALM SUNDAY

16 Frontier Regional 911 Board of Directors Meeting 1:30

16 Tri-County Community Corrections Board 3:30 Gilliam County

16 Wasco City Council 7

17 Sherman County Court 9

18 Sherman County Book Club 6 Sherman County Public/School Library

19 Frontier TeleNet Board Meeting TBA

19 GOOD FRIDAY

21 EASTER SUNDAY

24 Tri-County Courts 10-2 Sherman County Courthouse

26 N. Central Livestock Assoc. Bull Tour to Gilliam County starts 9 Wasco School


 

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Sherman County eNews #80

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County High School Baseball Schedule Update, April 4

  2. Do You Understand the Electoral College?

  3. Columbia Gorge Chapter of Women for Agriculture Offer Scholarship

  4. Notice. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting, March 25

  5. Notice. Sherman County Court at Frontier TeleNet Meeting, March 25

  6. Notice. Farm Service Agency Accepts Applications for Program Technician, Updated

  7. Harney County Migratory Bird Festival, April 11-14

  8. Substantial Self-Esteem

  9. Congressman Walden’s Town Hall Schedule

  10. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“When we become more fully aware that our success is due in large measure to the loyalty, helpfulness, and encouragement we have received from others, our desire grows to pass on similar gifts. Gratitude spurs us on to prove ourselves worthy of what others have done for us. The spirit of gratitude is a powerful energizer.” — Wilferd A. Peterson


1. Sherman County High School Baseball Schedule Update, April 4

sport-baseball1Sherman added the following 2 baseball games vs. The Dalles JV:

Thursday April 4 @ Wahtonka Field in The Dalles- 3PM and 5PM

~Mike Somnis, Athletic Director


2. Do You Understand the Electoral College?

American flag2It’s in the news again. Do you understand what the Electoral College is? Or how it works? Or why America uses it to elect its presidents instead of just using a straight popular vote? Author, lawyer and Electoral College expert Tara Ross does, and she explains that to understand the Electoral College is to understand American democracy.  See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6s7jB6-GoU&feature=youtu.be.


3. Columbia Gorge Chapter of Women for Agriculture Offer Scholarship

pencil.spiralGraduating high school senior in your family or circle of friends?  Let them know about a $500 scholarship sponsored by the Columbia Gorge Chapter of Oregon Women for Agriculture.

Scholarship Application Rules

  1. Student must be / have been a resident of Hood River, Wasco, Sherman or Gilliam County a minimum of two years during their high school education.
  2. Preference goes to a student pursuing a major in agricultural studies, with a 3.0 GPA or higher, female.
  3. Money is expected to be used for tuition and/or books.
  4. Applications must be postmarked no later than May 1 of the given year.

Contact school guidance office for application or contact Cindy Brown, 541-565-3230 cindy.brown@oregonstate.edu


4. Notice. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting, March 25

Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting

Monday, March 25 at 10 a.m.

Sherman County Courthouse

Teleconference Dial-in (669) 900-6833

Meeting ID 953-867-046

Agenda is posted here:

https://frontiertelenet.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/2019-Mar-25-FTN-Bd-Mtg-Agenda-jrd-03-21-2019_fn_sec.pdf


5. Notice. Sherman County Court at Frontier TeleNet Meeting, March 25

ShermanCoLogoA quorum of the County Court may be present at the Frontier TeleNet meeting to be held on Monday March 25, 2019 at 10am in the Commissioners Meeting Room – 500 Court Street, Moro, OR. 97039.

 


6. Notice. Farm Service Agency Accepts Applications for Program Technician, Updated

NOTICE OF PERMANENT VACANCY. Gilliam-Wheeler County Farm Service Agency Program Technician. The Gilliam-Wheeler County Farm Service Agency (FSA) is accepting applications for a permanent, full-time Program Technician in Condon, Oregon. Applications will be accepted beginning Thursday, March 21 and closing Wednesday, April 3rd. Salary range of $26,587 – $53,773 per year based on qualifications and experience. Responsibilities include: Carrying out office activities and functions pertaining to one or more of the program areas administered in the county, interpreting and explaining procedures, program regulations and forms to producers and other agency personnel, utilizing various web-based software applications to maintain producer data and processing automated forms, using a high degree of initiative and judgment in planning and carrying out assigned tasks and resolving problems encountered. A copy of the vacancy announcement and application may be obtained online by visiting: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/527939800.  For more information please contact the Oregon FSA State Admin Specialist Martin Nguyen at 503-404-1127 or email at martin.nguyen@or.usda.gov.


7. Harney County Migratory Bird Festival, April 11-14

bird.eagleThe Harney County Migratory Bird Festival was first held in 1981 ​to celebrate the large annual migration of birds passing through Harney Basin on the Pacific Flyway. Harney Basin is one of the three most important areas left in the western United States for spring migratory birds stopping on their way north.

Over 300 species of birds use the refuge throughout each year, making Harney Basin a bird watcher’s paradise. Today, we continue to celebrate the migratory birds’ return each year with guided tours led by experts, workshops, and fun activities for youth and adults.  See https://www.migratorybirdfestival.com/bird-tours-schedule


8. Substantial Self-Esteem

Is an intense desire for personal growth and development a selfish thing? Some people think it is, but that’s not necessarily so. Today, let’s give this a little deeper thought.

Human beings are social beings. We feel the most lasting satisfaction and meaning from our relationships with other people. We have a strong need to belong, to love and be loved, to feel needed and accepted. But how much love you can give – and accept – depends on how you feel about yourself.

Long before you can improve your relationships with others, you must first improve your relationship with yourself. If you don’t value and care for yourself, it is difficult to value and care for others. Remember, it is our inner thoughts, our inner beliefs, that get played out in the world around us.

Also, did you know that having a high sense of self-worth is contagious? You see, when your self-esteem is high, you almost automatically nurture and mentor those around you, as well. Think back. In your years of working or playing in groups of people, large or small, who have you gravitated toward? Has it been those folks who unselfishly give to and support those around them? Has just being in their presence given a lift to your own sense of self?

To sum it up, how you feel about yourself directly affects how you live life and how you relate to others. So, it’s far from selfish to want to grow as a person and to feel a healthy, substantial sense of self-esteem. In fact, a higher self-esteem will make you more generous. Most of us do unto others as we do unto ourselves, so to speak.

And when you live with a storehouse of quiet, deep gladness in your heart, you’ll be in a far better position to share, reach out, give and receive from others. ~The Pacific Institute


9. Congressman Walden’s Town Hall Schedule

Oregon.Flat.poleSecond District, Representative Greg Walden (R-Hood River) announced today he will hold town halls in Wallowa, Union, Baker, Grant, Wheeler, Gilliam, and Sherman counties next week. Details on the meetings are included below.

“I’m looking forward to hearing from people across eastern Oregon at these town halls and providing them with an update on the issues I’m working on back in Congress. These forums are another important way for me to listen and answer questions, just as are telephone town halls, Facebook, Twitter, emails, phone calls, and regular old letters. Last year, I responded to more than 67,000 phone calls, letters, and emails from people across the Second District. It’s good to have people engaged in the process and willing to share their views,” said Walden.

Walden held town halls across eight counties in southern, central, and eastern Oregon in January and held town halls in Lake and Morrow counties in February. Just last week, Walden held town hall meetings in Hood River, Wasco, and Umatilla counties, bringing his town hall total to 161 since 2012. Walden’s upcoming town hall meetings next week will bring his town hall total to 168 since 2012, and Walden will have held town hall meetings in all 20 counties of Oregon’s Second District in the first three months of 2019.

Sunday, March 31, 2019

WHAT: Gilliam County Town Hall

WHEN: 11:00 a.m. PT

WHERE: Anderson Building/Wheatland Insurance, 307 S Main Street, Condon

WHAT: Sherman County Town Hall

WHEN: 2:30 p.m. PT

WHERE: Wasco School Events Center, 903 Barnett Street, Wasco


10. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owlDo you understand the Electoral College?

Gorge Grown Food Network & Farmers’ Markets

Harney County Migratory Bird Festival, April 11-14

Marvel at the beauty of California’s wildflower super bloom as seen from space

The Right Way to Overhaul Our Health Care System

Climate Change: What’s So Alarming?

Problems With Aging Wind Farms

U.S. Wheat sees ‘good growth potential’ in key markets 


 

Sherman County eNews #79

CONTENTS

  1. Bernice Gibbs 1926 – 2019

  2. Community College Class: “Facilitating: Collaborative Meetings & Decision Making”

  3. Community education course teaches all about golf

  4. Tri-County Veteran Benefit and Resource Fair, June 8

  5. On the Subject of Talent

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

  7. Oregon Historical Society Free for Youth During Spring Break, March 23-31

  8. Greg Walden applauds $4 million in new grants to combat opioid crisis in Oregon


“History is a ribbon, always unfurling. History is a journey. And as we continue our journey, we think of those who traveled before us . . .”  ~William J. Bennett, The American Patriot’s Almanac: Daily Readings on America


1. Bernice Gibbs 1926 – 2019

flower.rose.starBernice Gibbs was born the 4th of 9 children to Clifford and Rufus Bennett, October 18, 1926 in Lakeland, Florida. Her mother was a homemaker; her father was later a ferryboat captain who transported vacation guests like the Fords and Rockefellers from Brunswick, Georgia to the Jekyll Island Resort, where he was also the caretaker. Bernice and two of her sisters also worked on the island in the summers. She had eight siblings: Lillian, Mildred, Doris, Rufus, Clifford, Ada, Virginia and David.

She met her husband Jim Gibbs while he was in the Army, stationed in Georgia and she was working as a waitress in Brunswick. They married May 20, 1945. Bernice and Jim lived in Georgia as well as Idaho and had three daughters: Geneva, Bonnie and Mary. The family eventually moved to Coos Bay, Oregon where they raised their daughters.

Bernice was a homemaker and later one of the first women to be hired at the Georgia Pacific Mill in the early ‘60s. In 1973 they moved to Eugene and Bernice retired. As she continued with her hobbies of gardening, crocheting and bowling… she still found time for Jim’s newfound love of perfecting bread making and tofu. Together they ground wheat & soybeans and she canned, pickled, dried and jellied anything they could find.

Bernice was widowed in 1988 but made new friends bowling, playing cards and at the monthly Friendship Club…but family always came first. She became a rabid Blazer basketball fan in the early ‘90s and always watched the games. She was a wonderful wife, mother, grandmother and a beautiful soul who never said no to anyone in need.

Bernice passed away March 12th at the age of 92. She is survived by Geneva and Jessy Sutton of Wasco, Bonnie Dawson of Eugene and Mary & Jim Burke of Eugene; grandchildren Brenda Teekell of Natchitoches, Louisiana; Sylvia Reiten and Jessie Führer of Wasco, Oregon; Cheryl Kirnber, Billy Hall, Corrine Koke and Ami Smith of Eugene; many great and great-great-grandchildren, and her sister, Virginia Bassford of Payette, Idaho. Funeral services will be held Saturday, March 23rd at 11am at Lane Memorial Gardens, 5300 W. 11th Ave. Eugene, OR 97402. ~The Register-Guard, Eugene, Oregon


2. Community College Class: “Facilitating: Collaborative Meetings & Decision Making”

In an age of divisiveness, it is more important than ever to communicate effectively. If you attend meetings, serve on a committee or board of directors, or simply want to learn how to be heard and collaborate with others, the techniques of effective facilitation are invaluable.

Columbia Gorge Community College Community Education offers “Facilitating:  Collaborative Meetings & Decision Making” on Tuesdays, April 3, 17 and 24 from 6 to 9 p.m. on the Hood River – Indian Creek Campus.

This nine-hour Community Education course covers the basics of group dynamics including facilitating organizational and team meetings, and cooperative decision-making. Class fee is $99. Call CGCC at (541) 506-6011 in Hood River or (541) 308-8211 in The Dalles to register, or for more information.


3. Community education course teaches all about golf

golf2Are you interested in learning golf? Columbia Gorge Community Education has just the class for you.

Students will learn the difference between a birdie and a bogey, a hook and a slice, and which clubs are needed for a variety of routine shots. Receive hands-on experience, and learn the basics of the game with a qualified golf instructor at The Dalles Country Club.

Classes are Tuesdays from April 2-23, 1:30 to 2:30 daily. Cost is $105 with a class limit of eight players. People are invited to register online at cgcc.edu or call CGCC Community Education, (541) 308-8211.


4. Tri-County Veteran Benefit and Resource Fair, June 8

Veteran Benefit and Resource Fair

June 8, 2019 – 9:00 am – 3:00 pm

Earl Snell Memorial Park, Arlington, Oregon

Free event for veterans! Come learn about benefits, sign up for giveaways, and most importantly, apply for the benefits you’ve earned through your military service.

Please contact Tri County Veteran Service Officer Bryan Hunt at bhunt@ncesd.k12.or.us or cell 541-993-9144 with any questions. Sponsored by Tri-County Veteran Services, PO Box 168, Moro, OR 97039,


5. On the Subject of Talent

Are you a talented person? Whether you see yourself that way or not, you need to know that you have at least one natural talent.

It is easy for us to look at a famous musician or artist or dancer and say, “Wow, that person is really talented.” But if someone were to ask you whether you, yourself, are talented, you’d be inclined to say, “Well, no, not really.”

You see, most of us who don’t have brilliant careers in the arts have been trained to see ourselves as lacking in talent. Oh, we may be hard workers, and we may be willing to learn what we have to learn in order to do well in our jobs, but we don’t see ourselves as particularly talented.

The fact is, though, we are wrong. All of us have some natural talent. Now, it may not be musical or artistic talent, but maybe we have an affinity for remembering numbers, or maybe we can visualize solid shapes and are good at thinking in three dimensions. Maybe we are very good at handling small tools with precision, or maybe we are a whiz with computers and the latest electronic gadgets on the market. Perhaps we have no trouble breaking down an idea into its component parts.

You see, there are many kinds of talent, just as there are many kinds of people, and all are valuable. So, don’t sell yourself short if you can’t compose a symphony or paint like the Old Masters. And don’t sell your kids short, either. Instead, encourage them to find their natural gifts and not worry about the things they’re not so good at. You’ll be helping them to build high self-esteem and create highly individual, satisfying lives.

What are your natural talents? Take some time, and give yourself a good look. Our talents may be a challenge to recognize at first, because of how we’ve been conditioned to define “talent,” but they are there! It is a guarantee. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Editorial: No special treatment for the press [public records legislation]

Editorial: Taxpayers should not have to fund candidates they don’t like

Brazil move opens door to U.S. wheat imports

 Oregon lawmakers consider raising own pay by 63 percent to boost diversity

Solenodons: A Tiny Mammal, No Bark But Plenty of Venomous Bite

Three Big Differences Between Conservatives and Progressives

Soros-Funded PR Shop Constructing Media Echo Chamber To Push Impeachment


7. Oregon Historical Society Free for Youth During Spring Break, March 23-31

Portland, OR – Are you planning a stay-cation this spring break? A trip to the Oregon Historical Society is the perfect adventure to get the kids out of the house — and, the Oregon Historical Society will be offering free admission for youth 18 and under during Oregon’s spring break week beginning Saturday, March 23 through Sunday, March 31.

The Oregon Historical Society’s museum is full of new and exciting exhibitions, including:

Experience Oregon

Last month on Oregon’s 160th birthday, the Oregon Historical Society transformed its museum with the opening of a brand new 7,000 square foot permanent exhibition. Taking over the third floor of the museum, Experience Oregon spotlights the countless people, places, and events that have shaped Oregon. Families can discover stories from the past in animated “Stories from the Archives” tablet games, learn how to build a canoe, walk through a covered-wagon replica, and take sides in historical debates.

History Hub

The Oregon Historical Society’s first permanent exhibit designed specifically for youth, History Hub, invites families to explore the topic of diversity through fun, hands-on elements. With puzzles, touch screen activities, and board games, History Hub asks youth to consider questions like “Who is an Oregonian?,” “How has discrimination and segregation affected people who live in Oregon?,” and “How can you make Oregon a great place for everyone?”

Barley, Barrels, Bottles, & Brews: 200 Years of Oregon Beer

Now through June 9

Don’t be fooled by the name – this exhibit has something for everyone, even those under 21! This original exhibit tells the stories of the many people and businesses that have influenced the laws, agriculture, and prolific expansion of the brewing industry. Highlights include a glass carboy that traveled across the Oregon Trail and an interactive hop smelling station. Before you visit, learn about the making of the exhibit on the OHS blog with Curator Lori Erickson.

Museum hours are Monday – Saturday from 10am – 5pm and Sunday from 12pm – 5pm. General admission is $10, and discounts are available for seniors and teachers. Admission is free every day for OHS members and Multnomah County residents!


8. Greg Walden applauds $4 million in new grants to combat opioid crisis in Oregon

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Representative Greg Walden (R-Hood River) today applauded new resources to combat the opioid crisis in Oregon. As part of newly released grant funding from the Trump Administration, Oregon will receive more than $4 million though the State Opioid Response grant program, which helps communities expand access to opioid abuse and addiction treatment services.

“We lose more Oregonians to drug overdoses than car accidents and this opioid crisis has hit every community in our state. Combating opioid abuse in Oregon requires an all-hands-on-deck approach,” said Walden. “These needed resources will provide support to the medical providers and treatment advocates on the front lines of this fight in Oregon to boost prevention efforts, increase access to medication assisted treatment, and expand recovery options for patients. Paired with my legislation that is now law — the SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act — and the past funding Oregon has received through similar federal programs, this new funding will bolster our efforts to tackle the opioid crisis from all angles for victims and families in our communities. While we made great strides last Congress, our work is far from done, and I will continue to work alongside my colleagues and people on the ground in Oregon to stem the tide of addiction and save lives.”

The $4,109,241 Oregon will receive is part of an additional $487 million to supplement first-year funding through the State Opioid Response (SOR) grant program. The grants are part of the Trump Administration’s Five-Point Opioid Strategy to combat the opioid crisis.

Walden’s legislation, the SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act (H.R. 6), is a bipartisan bill that was signed into law last year and authorized billions of dollars to combat the opioid crisis, including $1.5 billion authorized for the State Targeted Response program. Over the last two years, Oregon received more than $17 million through the State Targeted Response program to combat the crisis.

Walden’s legislation will help in our overall efforts to combat the opioid crisis by advancing treatment and recovery initiatives, improving prevention, protecting our communities, and bolstering our efforts to fight deadly illicit synthetic drugs like fentanyl.

Walden has been at the forefront of the Congressional response to the opioid crisis, leading efforts to pass landmark legislation to combat opioid abuse and investigate the bad actors contributing to the spread of the crisis.


 

Sherman County eNews #78

CONTENTS

  1. CorrectedSherman County Preschool Open Enrollment, April 5

  2. Two Centuries of Immigration Visualized

  3. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Spring Grant Cycle

  4. Wasco County Historical Society Poker Run to Benefit Society Programs, April 14

  5. Sherman County Court Notes for February 20

  6. Sherman County Court Notes for March 6

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Corrected: Sherman County Preschool Open Enrollment, April 5

Sherman County Preschool is looking ahead to next school year.  We will be holding an open enrollment at 6pm on April 5th in the preschool.  We encourage anyone interested in their child attending preschool to complete an enrollment packet.  Space is limited to 20 children and Head Start spots are limited as well.

To be eligible for the 2019-2020 preschool year your child must be 3-5 years of age on or before September 1st, 2019 and be potty trained.  We contract with both North Central ESD and Umatilla Morrow Head Starts to provide Head Start services to qualifying families.  They are both wonderful agencies with great employees who love to help kids and their families, but again spots are limited so you don’t want to miss out on signing up.  Most, if not all, spots will be filled by early summer.

Sherman Co. Preschool is a QRIS 5-star program with a Director (Carrie Somnis) & 3 Teachers (Brenda Massie, Sarah Goodenough & Miranda Owens) who love children and have over 30+ years of combined teaching experience.  Sherman Co. Preschool is located in Moro in the elementary wing of the Sherman County School.  We introduce preschoolers to learning in a warm and caring environment that encourages children to learn through play and structured small group activities.  We offer transportation services in the afternoon with stops in Moro and Wasco at each daycare.

If you are unable to make the open enrollment but are interested in your child attending preschool next year please send an email to shermanpreschool@yahoo.com with your name, mailing address, and child’s age/name as of September 1st, 2019.

Feel free to call the preschool directly with any questions.  The phone number is (541) 565-3320, hours are 7:30am-2pm Monday-Thursday.  During preschool hours (8am-12pm) we are busy with kids & may not answer, but please leave a message and someone will return your call as soon as possible.


2. Two Centuries of Immigration Visualized

See an amazing animated map here:

http://metrocosm.com/us-immigration-history-map.html.


3. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Spring Grant Cycle

arrow-rightApplications for the 2019 Spring Grant Cycle for Sherman County’s Cultural Coalition are now being accepted. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: March 29, 2019

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: https://www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:

Sherman County Cultural Coalition
P.O. Box 23
Moro, OR 97039

Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


4. Wasco County Historical Society Poker Run to Benefit Society Programs, April 14

cargreencoupeWasco County Historical Society invites the public to join them in their Sunday, April 14th, 40-mile long “Poker Run”.  Registration is 10:00-1:00 in the parking lot at the Discovery Center & Museum.  Ten dollars per “hand” with multiple hands available.

The route follows the Historical Hwy. into Mosier, back into The Dalles over Sevenmile Hill, with optional stops along the way.  All motorized vehicles are welcome with the entire route being paved roads.  It’s a fun way to explore our history!

Additional details may be obtained from John Brookhouse at 541-980-0918.


5. Sherman County Court Notes for February 20

By Administrative Assistant Kayla von Borstel

*NOTE:

– This is a very brief outline ONLY of topics considered “public interest”.

– These are NOT OFFICIAL MINUTES. For official minutes and full details, please see the approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us after the next Court session. Thank you.

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on February 20, 2019, and in conducting the business of the County,

  • agreed to amend the proposed draft resolution in the County Court of the State of Oregon in and for the County of Sherman County in the matter of requesting that the Oregon Business Development Department designate a Rural Renewable Energy Development Zone (RREDZ) in Sherman County Oregon with the County of Sherman setting the amount of real market value (RMV) for qualified property that may be exempt in this RREDZ from $50 million to $250 million, based on the RMV of property for the assessment year at the start of the exemption immediately after property is placed in service;
  • approved the resolution as amended during Sherman County Court in the County Court of the State of Oregon in and for the County of Sherman County in the matter of requesting that the Oregon Business Development Department designate a Rural Renewable Energy Development Zone (RREDZ) in Sherman County Oregon, and authorized the County Court to sign;
  • discussed the Coordinating Care Organization (CCO) Boundary Change;
  • appointed Janet Pinkerton to the Senior Center Advisory Board for a term of 3 years to expire December 31, 2021;
  • appointed Gary Thompson to the Sherman County Grant Housing Review Committee;
  • appointed Roger Whitley to the North Central Public Health District Board for a term of 2 years to expire December 31, 2020;
  • removed Linda Thompson from the North Central Public Health District Board;
  • removed Kari Silcox from the Mid-Columbia Community Action Council (MCCAC);
  • approved the Association of Oregon Counties (AOC) County College tuition for Commissioner Bird in the amount of $750 for the 2019 year;
  • approved Oregon State University (OSU) proposal for an Ag Extension Agent to be housed in Sherman County, with total County cap set at $120,431.00 for the position;
  • approved the Biggs Service District Ordinance #11-7-18, in the County Court of the State of Oregon in and for the County of Sherman for an ordinance establishing regulations regarding connections, operations, and rates for water services for the Biggs Service District;
  • noted that Cindy Heater-Judah, Senior Center Head Cook, will be retiring soon, and Kari Silcox, Senior Center Manager, placed an ad for her replacement, it was stated Commissioner Bird would sit in on the hiring committee to represent the County Court.

6. Sherman County Court Notes for March 6

By Administrative Assistant Kayla von Borstel

*NOTE:

– This is a very brief outline ONLY of topics considered “public interest”.

– These are NOT OFFICIAL MINUTES. For official minutes and full details, please see the approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at http://www.co.sherman.or.us after the next Court session. Thank you.

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on March 6, 2019, and in conducting the business of the County,

  • met as the Compensation Board;
  • approved a 2.8% Cost of Living Adjustment (COLA) increase for County Employees for fiscal year 2018-2019;
  • agreed to continue Employee insurance benefits at the current level;
  • entered into Executive Session in Accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (i) Personnel;
  • approved Compensation Board Merit Decisions, approved step increases for those eligible with the following written requests: Travis West, Kyle Pfeifer, Paul Yoon, Solomon Jacobson, Bruce Olsen, Gary Shull, Richard Jauken Jr., and Amy Asher, with Amy’s weekly hours increasing from 20 hours to 25 hours per week;
  • approved step increases for the following County Employees: Kristi Brown, Daniel Son, Magee Kennedy, Drew Messenger, Kayla von Borstel, Kari Silcox, Dan Aldrich, and the RV Camp Host to increase from $350 per month to $400 per month, as requested by Georgia Macnab;
  • approved the Weed Control Intergovernmental Agreement between the State of Oregon, and Sherman and Wasco Counties, as the State wishes to utilize County resources to provide vegetation and noxious weed abatement within the State jurisdiction and right of way, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign;
  • appointed Sharon Spencer to the Senior Center Advisory Board for a term of 3 years to expire December 31, 2021;
  • appointed Dan Aldrich to the Special Transportation Committee for a term of 3 years to expire December 31, 2021;
  • proclaimed the week of April 7-14, 2019, as Sherman County Crime Victims’ Rights Week and authorized Judge Dabulskis to sign;
  • approved the Sherman County Public Transportation Advisory Committee proposed Bylaws amendment, and authorized County Court to sign;
  • approved the submittal for the Special Transportation Grant Application for the 2019-2021 Biennium;
  • approved the grant submittal form for the Special Transportation 5310 Grant Application for the 2019-2021 Biennium;
  • heard Commissioner McCoy present the Court with County projections from 2018 to 2025, with 2017 actual figures, to aid in planning for special projects using Strategic Implementation Program (SIP) funds during the next seven years, which included one year after the SIP funds cease, and the last scheduled payments to the Sherman County School District and reserves would be due. His projection sheets summarize all County expenditures and revenue.

7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbOregon House Bill 2297 | Preliminary Summary | Maintains Oregon Daylight Savings Time

The Morning Brew: News Deserts or Communities with Little or No Local Reporting

Subscribe to The Morning Brew

Two Centuries of Immigration, Animated

 “We do not believe any group of men adequate enough or wise enough to operate without scrutiny or without criticism. We know that the only way to avoid error is to detect it, that the only way to detect it is to be free to inquire. We know that in secrecy error undetected will flourish and subvert”. – J Robert Oppenheimer.

Global Research. New Study on Species Extinction

The Advent of Extreme Weather Events and Climate Tipping Points

Media Bias Fact Check


 

Sherman County eNews #77

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County 4-H News Reports: The Tiny Teaspoons

  2. Charlotte Lenore (Ruggles) Barnett 1917-2019

  3. Sherman County Preschool Open Enrollment, April 5

  4. Farm Service Agency Accepts Applications for Program Technician

  5. Unearned Guilt

  6. The Morning Brew: News Deserts or Communities with Little or No Local Reporting

  7. Oregon House Bill 2297 | Preliminary Summary | Maintains Daylight Savings Time

  8. College readies surplus sale March 29-30


1. Sherman County 4-H News Reports: The Tiny Teaspoons

4-H clover1The Tiny Teaspoons 4-H club met on March 18, 2019 at 3:30pm at the Cranston’s house. Attending were Lexi, Coral, Maddie, Addie, Bella, Ava, Savannah B, Savannah D. Special guests were Gail Macnab and Debbie Bird. Pledge of Allegiance was led by Bella and the 4-H Pledge was led by Savannah D. Today we made Irish Soda Bread from a recipe out of It’s All Relative, Favorite Recipes of the Macnab Sisters, Family and Friends and Irish Soda Scones. While we were baking those, we each made a Shamrock Pretzel Pop and made tea.  When we were tasting the food, we played a game with kitchen verbs. After we played, we were talking about what we made. Our next meeting will be in April. Meeting was adjourned at 5:30pm. Signed Alexis Holt and Maddie Cranston.


2. Charlotte Lenore (Ruggles) Barnett 1917-2019

flower.rose.starCharlotte Barnett passed away peacefully Saturday, March 16, 2019, at Flagstone in The Dalles, Oregon.

Charlotte was born May 27, 1917, in Moro, Oregon, at her Grandparent Hulse’s home to Oscar and Allie (Hulse) Ruggles. She joined two siblings, Orville and Zela (McKinney) and the family soon moved to their place at Finnegan. They attended the Liberty School three miles from home and then went to the Grass Valley School when Charlotte was in the sixth grade through high school where she excelled in sports.

Charlotte married Willard Henry Barnett when she was 18 on August 29, 1935. They bought the ranch two miles north of Grass Valley where she lived until after she turned 99, when she moved to The Dalles. Charlotte and Willard’s son Keith was born November 11, 1936.

She is survived by Keith & Marilyn (Smith) Barnett, grandson Lee Barnett & Laurie Booth, great-grandchildren Brandan & Abigayle Barnett and Morgan Barnett, and two great-great-grandchildren, Addyson Mae and Wyatt Benjamin.

Charlotte’s funeral will be held at 11:00 a.m., Friday, March 22, 2019, at the Grass Valley Baptist Church. A potluck meal will follow the service at the church. Please bring a side dish or dessert.


3. Sherman County Preschool Open Enrollment, April 5

boy.telephonetalkSherman County Preschool is looking ahead to next school year. We will be holding an open enrollment at 5:30pm on April 5th in the preschool. We encourage anyone interested in having their child attend preschool to complete an enrollment packet. Space is limited to 20 children and Head Start spots are limited as well.

To be eligible for the 2019-2020 preschool year your child must be 3-5 years of age on or before September 1st, 2019 and be potty trained. We contract with both North Central ESD and Umatilla Morrow Head Starts to provide Head Start services to qualifying families. They are both wonderful agencies with great employees who love to help kids and their families, but again spots are limited so you don’t want to miss out on signing up. Most, if not all, spots will be filled by early summer.

Sherman County Preschool is a QRIS 5-star program with a Director, Carrie Somnis, and three teachers, Brenda Massie, Sarah Goodenough and Miranda Owens, who love children and have over 30+ years of combined teaching experience. Sherman County Preschool is located in Moro in the elementary wing of the Sherman County School. We introduce preschoolers to learning in a warm and caring environment that encourages children to learn through play and structured small group activities. We offer transportation services in the afternoon with stops in Moro and Wasco at each daycare.

If you are unable to attend the open enrollment but are interested in your child attending preschool next year please send an email to shermanpreschool@yahoo.com with your name, mailing address, and child’s age/name as of September 1st, 2019. Feel free to call the preschool directly with any questions. The phone number is (541) 565-3320, hours are 7:30am-2pm Monday-Thursday. During preschool hours (8am-12pm) we are busy with kids & may not answer, but please leave a message and someone will return your call as soon as possible.


4. Farm Service Agency Accepts Applications for Program Technician

The Gilliam-Wheeler County Farm Service Agency (FSA) is accepting applications for a permanent Program Technician in Condon, Oregon. Applications will be accepted beginning Thursday, March 21 and closing Wednesday, April 3rd. Salary range of $26,587 – $53,773 per year based on qualifications and experience. A copy of the vacancy announcement and application may be obtained on line by visiting: https://www.usajobs.gov/ and searching for “Farm Service Agency” and location “Condon, OR.” For more information, please contact the FSA Office at 541-384-4251 ext 2. The Federal Service offers a comprehensive benefits package. Explore the benefits offered to most Federal employees at: https://www.usa.gov/benefits-for-federal-employees.


5. Unearned Guilt

People who would never think of trying to drive a car with the brakes on often do something very similar to themselves.

A wise and funny woman once said, “Show me a person without guilt, and I’ll show you a person without a mother!” Now, she herself was a mother and guilt, when it’s appropriate, is a useful function of a healthy conscience.

The point she was making through humor is that all of us suffer from at least a touch of guilt and feelings of unworthiness. When these feelings grow large enough to take over, it’s like trying to drive a car with the brakes on. You may go forward in fits and starts, but you won’t go very far.

Guilt and unworthiness are things we were taught to feel as children by well-intentioned, but misguided adults who probably didn’t realize the damage they were doing. By the time we became adults, these feelings were so ingrained that they became automatic responses – part of our self-image.

That’s the bad news. The good news is that you can take yourself off automatic and bring your consciousness to bear on these feelings. You can learn how to refuse to accept unearned guilt and forgive the people who unwisely taught you to feel unworthy. Chances are, they too were taught that way. But you can break that cycle.

A commitment to get rid of unnecessary guilt is a great place to start. Seek out resources – counselors, teachers, friends, classes, books, online video resources – that can help you feel the peace and personal power that is your birthright. Appropriate guilt is one thing, but unearned guilt is a whole other ballgame – and one we don’t need to play. ~The Pacific Institute


6. The Morning Brew: News Deserts or Communities with Little or No Local Reporting

newspaper-arrowLast year, Facebook released Today In, an initiative to highlight local news stories. Yesterday, Facebook launched This Is Actually Terrible, showing that in many places in the U.S., there isn’t enough local news to fuel Today In.

The report: Facebook (-3.32%) teamed up with academic researchers to measure news deserts, or “communities with little or no local reporting.” Here’s what they found:

  • About one-third of Facebook’s U.S. users live in areas that do not have sufficient local reporting to support Today In.
  • There’s not much regional bias, either. 26% of users in the West and 35% in the Midwest, Northeast, and South suffer from a lack of local news.

This map does a good job of illustrating the problem. The more green, the more local news. The less green…the less you know of the delights of reading a small town police blotter.  Read the rest at https://www.morningbrew.com/stories/the-facebook-post/.


7. Oregon House Bill 2297 | Preliminary Summary | Maintains Daylight Savings Time

https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2019R1/Downloads/CommitteeMeetingDocument/174052

clock.793WHAT THE MEASURE DOES:

Abolishes annual one-hour change in time from standard time to daylight saving time and maintains Oregon on daylight savings time.

BACKGROUND:

Daylight saving time is the practice of setting the clock one hour forward for 34 weeks of the year, allowing for more daylight in the evening hours. The United States used daylight saving time at times during World War I and II, with some state and local governments persisting in the practice. The Uniform Time Act of 1966 standardized

the practice nationwide, and allowed states to exempt themselves. Hawaii and Arizona, with the exception of the Navajo Nation, do not observe daylight saving time. Measures introduced in Congress, California, and Washington would end the twice-yearly time change and permanently maintain daylight saving time. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 26 states have introduced measures ending the practice of twice-yearly time changes.

A 2008 study concluded that the time spent changing clocks represented a $1.7 billion opportunity cost to the U.S. population. Another study found that daylight saving time costs the U.S. economy more than $433 million each year in the form of cardiac incidents, workplace injuries in the mining and construction sectors, and “cyberloafing”

in office settings. A 2014 study found a 6.3 percent increase in fatal automobile accidents over the six days following the time change. Senate Bill 320 ceases the one-hour time change and places Oregon permanently on daylight saving time. The measure is referred to voters for their approval or rejection the next regular general

election. Senate Joint Memorial 6 urges Congress to allow states to permanently maintain themselves on daylight saving time.


8. College readies surplus sale March 29-30

Every homeowner knows the feeling: You look around the house and realize other folks might find a better use for stuff you’re just not using anymore.

Staff at Columbia Gorge Community College recently completed a materials inventory and learned the college, too, needs to do a little spring cleaning. People are invited to see the results when the college hosts a Surplus Sale on Friday, March 29, from noon to 5 p.m. and Saturday, March 30, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Fort Dalles Readiness Center. The Readiness Center is located on The Dalles Campus at 402 East Scenic Drive.

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, which has offices on the college campus, is also participating in the event. All items are priced to sell; sale of college items will benefit the college’s general fund, while sale of surplus items from Oregon DEQ will benefit the college foundation’s general scholarship fund. Surplus items are posted on the college’s website, and include projectors, fire-proof safes, arc welders and welding hoods, a laser printer, desks, laptops, computers, office chairs, lecterns, shelving, book cases … even a set of barn doors.

For details, visit the college website, www.cgcc.edu.


 

Sherman County eNews #76

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County High School Tennis Update, March 19

  2. The Quality of Your Thoughts

  3. Notice. Sherman County Court, Opportunities Analysis Meeting Quorum, March 20

  4. Sherman County 4-H Camp Wins Awards

  5. NOTICE OF ELECTION OF DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS, FILING DEADLINE, March 21

  6. Looking for a summer job? Cottonwood Canyon, Deschutes Recreation Area Positions


1. Sherman County High School Tennis Cancelled, March 19

LogoShermanCoSchoolThe tennis match at White Salmon on March 19 has been cancelled due to ongoing snow issues.

 

 

 


2. The Quality of Your Thoughts

Can the mind help cure disease? What role do the emotions play in preventing illness?

What is the relationship between the thoughts you think, the feelings you experience, and the overall health and well-being of your body? This is a very old question, but modern science has developed some innovative ways to determine the answers. And, while what they are finding may startle some people, it doesn’t come as a big surprise.

It turns out that improving the quality of your life lowers your chances of developing serious mental and physical illness and also improves the speed and likelihood of your recovery. And if you want to improve the quality of your life, you must start by improving the quality of your thinking.

You see, the quality of what happens to you in life – all of your accomplishments, all your behaviors and activities, all your relationships – are rooted in and based on what goes on in your mind. Your beliefs and expectations determine what you try or don’t try, how hard you try, and whether you give up or ultimately succeed.

Your thoughts about who you are and what you are like determine those with whom you associate, what you take into your body and how you care for yourself and others. So if you are interested in improving your likelihood of living a long and healthy life, take a long and careful look at your belief system and spend some time examining your thoughts and values, as well.

If you don’t like what you see, remember, you can change it. You have it within you. You always have. ~The Pacific Institute


3. Notice. Sherman County Court, Opportunities Analysis Meeting Quorum, March 20

ShermanCoLogoA quorum of the County Court may be present at the Opportunities Analysis meeting to be held on Wednesday March 20, 2019 at 630pm in the Burnet Building – 66365 Lonerock Road, Moro, OR. 97039. For questions please call Carrie Pipinich at 541-296-2266.


4. Sherman County 4-H Camp Wins Awards

4-H clover1Sherman County 4-H Camp won two awards at the recent Oregon State University Family Community Health conference held March 11-14 in Corvallis.  “Healthier Food on the Menu at Sherman 4-H Camp” was recognized for the Innovation in Programming Award and the Communications Awards for Educational Publication.  These awards were accepted by Sherman 4-H educator Cindy Brown on behalf of Program Secretary Sue Mabe, Camp Cook Shelly Bird, and herself.  This recognition was given to Sherman County 4-H Camp because of staff efforts to make the camp menu healthier by incorporating Oregon State University Food Hero healthy recipes into meals, and sending home a recipe booklet for families.

Cindy Brown, Educator

Oregon State University

OSU Extension Service – Sherman County

College of Public Health & Human Sciences

4-H Youth Development & SNAP-Ed

P: 541-565-3230 | C: 541-993-5291

extension.oregonstate.edu/sherman


5. NOTICE OF ELECTION OF DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS, FILING DEADLINE, March 21

Filing Deadline is 5:00pm Thursday, March 21, 2019

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 an election will be held in Sherman County, Oregon for the purpose of electing board members to fill the following positions and terms, including any vacancy which may exist on the boards of the following districts:

KENT WATER DISTRICT:
Position 3 – 4 Year Term
Position 5 – 4 Year Term

MORO RURAL FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT
Position 1 – 4 Year Term
Position 4 – 4 Year Term

NORTH CENTRAL EDUCATION SERVICE DISTRICT:
Zone 3 (Rufus & Wasco) – 4 Year Term
Zone 4 (Moro, Grass Valley & Kent) – 2 Year Term

NORTH SHERMAN COUNTY RURAL FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT:
Position 2 – 4 Year Term
Position 3 – 4 Year Term

SHERMAN COUNTY HEALTH DISTRICT:
Position 1 – 4 Year Term
Position 2 – 4 Year Term

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT:
Position 1 – 4 Year Term
Position 5 – 4 Year Term

SOUTH SHERMAN FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT:
Position 1 – 4 Year Term
Position 2 – 4 Year Term
Position 3 – 4 Year Term
Position 5 – 2 Year Term

This election will be conducted by mail. Each candidate for an office listed above must file a District Candidate Filing form (SEL 190) including a $10 filing fee, or file a District Candidate Filing form, Candidate Signature Sheet(s) Nonpartisan (SEL 121) with signatures of eligible Sherman County voters, and Petition Submission form (SEL 338) at the Sherman County Clerk’s Office no earlier than February 9, 2019 and no later than 5:00 p.m. on March 21, 2019. The Sherman County Courthouse is located at 500 Court Street in Moro, Oregon. If you have any questions, please contact the Clerk’s Office at 541-565-3606.


6. Looking for a summer job? Cottonwood Canyon, Deschutes Recreation Area Positions

Looking for a summer job? We have just that! Cottonwood Canyon State Park and Deschutes State Recreation Area are looking to hire multiple Park Ranger Assistants for the summer season.

Spring and summer in Oregon State Parks is the busiest time of the year, and park staff turn to their reliable Park Ranger Assistants for help. Ranger Assistants are the small-time heroes of any park operation. They use a varied skillset and a can-do attitude to get the job done, while at the same time learning valuable on-the-job skills from their Ranger peers. Please consider joining our group of dedicated, fun-loving people who are passionate about serving our visitors, protecting special places and providing great experiences.

As a Park Ranger Assistant, you will assist year-round State Park staff in the protection, maintenance, operation and repair of state park lands, natural and cultural resources, structures, facilities, equipment and systems. Park Ranger Assistants typically perform basic tasks in a single area of park operations (e.g.: janitorial work, landscape maintenance, interpretation or visitor services), although some positions will require performing tasks in a variety of areas. Some work may require the most elementary skills in building trades, including carpentry, electrical, plumbing, painting and landscape maintenance. In addition, specialized skills in basic park maintenance and operations may be required. Park Ranger Assistants, on a task specific basis, may guide the work of individuals or teams composed of volunteers, seasonal, and/or temporary state park employees.

For more information, and to apply, visit the Oregon State Parks hiring page.

Other open positions with Oregon State Parks can be found here.


 

Sherman County eNews #75

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County 4-H News: Sherman County Swine Club Report

  2. Moro Church Congratulates Emma Witherspoon

  3. Grass Valley’s Annual Easter Egg Hunt, April 13

  4. 80th OREGON LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY–2019 Regular Session Senate Bill 928

  5. From Won’t Power to Will Power

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

  7. Oregon’s state art collection featured on new Oregon Arts Commission website


1. Sherman County 4-H News: Sherman County Swine Club Report

4-H clover1The Sherman County Swine Club met on March 10, 2019 at the Sherman County Extension Office @ 5:00 P.M.   Attending were Dillan, T’Sharra, Coral, Addie, Bailey, Cadence, Savannah, Michael, Allison, Ellery, Austin and Quinton. Addie led the Pledge of Allegiance and T’Sharra led the 4-H pledge. During this meeting we played a game to get acquainted, we elected officers, talked about purchasing a pig, a pop quiz and how to care for pigs. We also talked about our presentations, club shirts and our record books. Our next meeting will be on Monday, April 1st at Brennah’s house and it will be at 6:00 PM. The meeting was adjourned at 6:00 PM. ~Signed: Bailey Coelsch


2. Moro Church Congratulates Emma Witherspoon

music-notesEmma Witherspoon was selected to participate in the All Northwest Wind Symphony which performed on February 17th at the Portland Convention Center in Portland, Oregon. Emma was encouraged to apply by her Sherman County High School band teacher, John Gronberg, by an on-line video audition. Participants were selected to join this elite and talented group of young artists.

Emma stated, “It was a privilege to be surrounded by others who have the same drive and passion that I have. We were able to make the music uniquely our own. The concert was by far my favorite personal event in which I’ve had the honor to participate.  I thank all the people who supported me, especially my family and friends.”

Emma is a valuable member of the Moro Presbyterian Church family and helps with many church activities. ~Submitted by Carol MacKenzie on behalf of the Moro Presbyterian Church.


3. Grass Valley’s Annual Easter Egg Hunt, April 13

EasterBasketBoy

Grass Valley’s Annual Easter Egg Hunt!

No charge!

Ages 0 – 12 (or 6th grade)

Saturday, April 13th – the week before Easter

10 a.m. at Grass Valley Park & Pavilion

Prize for each child, gold & silver egg prizes.

Coloring contest winners announcement.

10 a.m. – Egg Hunt Begins

10:20 (approximately) The Reptile Zone – Hands-on & Educational

Learn about the Reptiles

Made possible by a generous grant from Sherman County Cultural Coalition.

Please bring a lunch to eat while we are setting up for the Skate Party!

11:15 a.m. until 2 p.m. Skate Party, all ages welcome! Skates are available for use.

Questions? Please call Jeanne at 541-714-5740 or City of Grass Valley at 541-333-2434 (Mon-Wed 9-4)


4. 80th OREGON LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY–2019 Regular Session Senate Bill 928

Oregon.Flat.poleThis could be one of the most significant bills of the current session, especially if some version of the carbon reduction bill, HB 2020 passes. Governor Brown will introduce the bill on March 21st at Senate Environment and Energy Committee, 1 PM HR C.

See the entire bill at   https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2019R1/Downloads/MeasureDocument/SB928/Introduced

“Sponsored by COMMITTEE ON ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES

SUMMARY

The following summary is not prepared by the sponsors of the measure and is not a part of the body thereof subject to consideration by the Legislative Assembly. It is an editor’s brief statement of the essential features of the measure as introduced. Establishes Oregon Climate Authority. Establishes Oregon Climate Board. Transfers greenhouse gas reporting program from Department of Environmental Quality to Oregon Climate Authority. Abolishes State Department of Energy. Transfers duties, functions and powers of State Department of Energy related to issuance of loans for small scale local energy projects to Oregon Business Development Department. Transfers remaining duties, functions and powers of State Department of Energy to Oregon Climate Authority. Modifies permissible uses of energy supplier assessment. Abolishes Sustainability Board and Oregon Global Warming Commission. Establishes Energy Program Review Task Force. Becomes operative January 1, 2020. Declares emergency, effective on passage. A BILL FOR AN ACT Relating to the Oregon Climate Authority; creating new provisions; amending… … …”


5. From Won’t Power to Will Power

Has anyone ever called you stubborn? Would you describe yourself that way? If so, you may be in luck when it comes to making positive changes.

Some people find themselves in trouble a lot because of a personality characteristic that they call stubbornness. You have heard of “will power.” Well, stubbornness is a kind of “won’t power.” It causes you to dig in and refuse to budge, and sometimes it drives other people crazy. And sometimes, it keeps you from growing closer to the person you want to be.

But, as Roger and McWilliams pointed out in their book series, Life 101, “Just as fear is also excitement, stubbornness is also determination. It’s simply a matter of shifting the focus from ‘won’t power’ back to ‘will power.’ Rather than, ‘I won’t get fat,’ change it to ‘I will keep a healthy, slim body.’ Rather than, ‘I won’t be around people who don’t support my efforts,’ say ‘I will seek out people who help me do what I want to do in life.’

“It’s a matter of finding the positive opposite and focusing on that, rather than aligning yourself with a negative. Stubbornness, if you use it to advantage, will stand you in good stead when it comes to achieving your goals and living out your values.”

Imagine yourself stubbornly refusing to accept anything but the best in life. Imagine yourself stubbornly holding on to your program of self-improvement and personal growth no matter what. It’s locking on to what you want, and not locking on to what you don’t want. If you shift your energy from stubbornness to determination, you’ll be doing yourself a big favor.

You will also become a positive role model for those around you. So prepare yourself for an up-tic in your influence, because your positive stubbornness just may turn you into a sought-after mentor. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.Envelope80th OREGON LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY– Senate Bill 928

Five things I’ve learned about farmers and ranchers

representUs | End Corruption | Defend the Republic 

The State of Oregon Art Collection

State of Oregon Art Collection at Ft. Dalles Readiness Center

Uber, Lyft and oil frackers: Tech mirages, not real businesses

U.S. Energy Information Administration. Oil: Crude & Petroleum Products – Explained Use of Oil

Watch Your Language: Sweet p is silenced by Greeks


7. Oregon’s state art collection featured on new Oregon Arts Commission website

art.toolsOregon’s public collection of more than 2,400 artworks acquired and commissioned since 1975 is now featured on a searchable website for all to view. The State of Oregon Percent for Art Collection includes paintings, works on paper, photography, sculpture, ceramics, glass, mosaics, murals, textiles and both site-specific and structurally integrated art installations by over 800 artists. A number of commissioned temporary works can also be found on the website.

The artworks, installed across the state, can be found in public buildings from La Grande to Corvallis and Medford to Portland, including on campuses of higher education at University of Oregon, Portland State University, Oregon State University, Southern Oregon University, Eastern Oregon University, Western Oregon University and Oregon Institute of Technology.

The new online interface allows Oregonians or visitors to experience the state’s art collection remotely or to plan visits to view art in person. Robust search capabilities allow tailored searches—for a teacher creating class curriculum, a student doing research or a curious member of the public.

Highlights of the collection include:

  • Two- and three-dimensional works by seminal Oregon artists including Louis Bunce, Sally Haley, Manuel Izquierdo, George Johanson, James Lavadour and Lucinda Parker.
  • Temporary artworks, including “Information Studio” (2008) by Tahni Holt, an interactive dance installation created during a month-long residency at Portland State University. The site-specific work transformed a glass enclosed meeting room at the Smith Memorial Student Union into a stage where performers followed directions via headphones to realize Holt’s choreography.
  • Integrated works like Henk Pander’s “The Road” (2006), a largescale painting of an imagined traffic accident based on the artist’s experiences riding along with various Oregon police, sheriff and fire departments. The painting was commissioned for the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem.
  • Memorials, such as Lead Pencil Studio’s “OSH Patient Memorial” (2014) at the Oregon State Hospital in Salem, which respectfully commemorates more than 3,400 individuals who passed away in Oregon state institutions from 1913 to 1970. The memorial includes a building displaying the historical metal canisters that held the ashes of individuals not claimed by family members. Facing this, a columbarium wall holds newly created ceramic urns with the inscribed names and living dates of the remains represented within.
  • Recent commissions include “Lessons from a Falling Star” (2018) by Garrick Imatani, installed at the University of Oregon. This project traces the legacy of “Tomanowas” (The Willamette Meteorite), which came to Oregon via the Missoula Floods approximately 15,000 years ago. The artist worked with the Clackamas tribe (part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde), who consider “Tomanowas” a sacred object, to 3D scan the meteorite and photograph current tribe members with a 3D printed replica in response to archival images showing the meteorite as discovered. A second aluminum replica of the meteorite is suspended in the atrium of Straub Hall in front of a mural showing water levels during the Missoula Floods.

Oregon was one of the first states in the nation to pass Percent for Art legislation, setting aside no less than 1 percent of funds for the acquisition of public-facing artwork in all state building construction projects with budgets over $100,000. Since 1975, the Percent for Art program has placed high-quality, accessible and mostly permanent art in public places. Over 275 state construction projects have qualified for Percent for Art funds and more than 2,000 Oregonians have taken part in the selection of artwork for their state’s higher education campuses and government facilities. The program, managed by the Oregon Arts Commission, remains dedicated to the enhancement of public environments and the improvement of the character and quality of state buildings.

Link to State of Oregon Percent for Art Collection websitehttp://state-of-oregon-art-collection.org/final/Portal.aspx