Sherman County eNews #237

CONTENTS

  1. Letter to the Editor: Memorable Museum Fundraising Event

  2. Letter to the Editor: Thank You, Wasco Market and Shell Station

  3. Mission: Possible – Benefit for Scholarships for Women, Oct. 6

  4. Short-Circuit Worry

  5. Walden, Wyden, Merkley Press Feds on Large Air Tankers

  6. Leanna Jean Bennett 1951-2019

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


As I think of the word “gratitude,” I recall that all the really great things in life are expressed in the simplest words: “purpose and meaning, friends and family, caring and community, love and work, appreciation and gratitude.” ~James R. Bradley


1. Letter to the Editor: Memorable Museum Fundraising Event

pencil.sharpKudos to Chris and Carrie Kaseberg and their entire crew … Gail Macnab, Jonathan and Kalie Rolfe and the Sherman County Historical Society sponsors for the fundraising gala on the 14th. They thought of everything to provide a memorable afternoon and evening. It is wonderful to see the younger generation volunteering and interested in keeping our museum funded. Thank you, everyone!

Sincerely,

Dorothy Benson

Moro


2. Letter to the Editor: Thank You, Wasco Market and Shell Station

pencil.sharpWasco Market and Shell Station at Biggs Junction, thank you for looking out for the health of our youth!

Sherman County Drug and Alcohol Prevention Coalition congratulates two Sherman County businesses that successfully passed a tobacco “sting” operation earlier this year.  That means that these two businesses DID NOT sell tobacco or tobacco related products to minors and checked ID for adults even though they looked over 21.

If your business needs assistance with proper age identification or signs for your store and register areas stating the legal sale age in Oregon or warning that you will check ID, please contact the Prevention Department at 541-565-5036. Again, thank you and congratulations to Wasco Market and Shell Station!  Your diligence is appreciated!

Amy Asher

Sherman County Drug and Alcohol Prevention Coalition

Moro


3. Mission: Possible – Benefit for Scholarships for Women, Oct. 6

arrow.blueswishTake a walk…Gather the clues…Win the Prize!

Join us this fall for The Dalles P.E.O. Chapter EJ’s fun family event, benefiting scholarships for women, so their missions can become possible.

  • Sunday, October 6, 2019
  • 1-4 p.m.
  • Registration 12-1 p.m.
  • Awards 4-5 p.m.
  • Starting at The Dalles City Park, ending at Clock Tower Ales

Team Details:  $60 for a team, with three people to a team.  If more than three people, it’s $20 additional.  Kids 10-18 are $10 and under 10 are free.  For pre-registration forms and more information, go to Facebook: The Dalles PEO Chapter EJ /Events “Mission Possible.”


4. Short-Circuit Worry

Most of us worry a bit from time to time, and there are probably a lot of us worrying about the state of the world these days. But you know, too much worry is a dangerous thing. You see, our awareness of the future is an important part of our search for meaning and purpose in life. However, when awareness of the future becomes dominated by uneasiness, then restlessness, fear and worry take over.

One of the staples in the Institute’s library is by J. Ruth Gendler, “The Book of Qualities.” While it was first published in 1988, much of it is relevant today. (And yes, it is still available.) It the book, Gendler makes “Worry” into a person who seems very real:

“Worry etches lines on people’s foreheads when they are not paying attention. She makes lists of everything that could go wrong while she is waiting for the train. She is sure she left the stove on, and the house is going to explode in her absence. When she makes love, her mind is on the failure rates and health hazards of birth control. The drug companies want worry to test their new tranquilizers, but they don’t understand what she knows too well: no drug can ease her pain. She is terrified of the unknown.”

That is the bad news. The good news is that, just as we manufacture stress by repeatedly looking forward in fear, we can learn to build new habits that replace worry with more constructive, positive thoughts. And in taking charge of our own thoughts, we are less at the mercy of other voices that seek to decide, for us, how we think and what we think about. Let’s face it, there is a lot of manipulation going on these days. We want to be very careful to avoid falling into a worry pit.

We can short-circuit the downward spiral of worry and fear and substitute images that will work for us instead of against us. We can learn to do this, because it is happening every day, all over the world.

Today seems like a good place to start. ~The Pacific Institute


5. Walden, Wyden, Merkley Press Feds on Large Air Tankers

American flag2U.S. Representative Greg Walden (R-Hood River) and U.S. Senators Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Jeff Merkley (D-OR) today pressed the Forest Service to explain why it has failed to award any ”call when needed” (CWN) contracts to providers of wildfire-fighting large air tankers (LAT).

The Oregon lawmakers noted in a letter to Forest Service Chief Vicki Christiansen that the “call when needed” solicitation was originally issued in July 2018 and closed several months ago in April 2019.

“As you are aware, CWN awards allow the Forest Service to put approved aircraft into service when those aircraft are needed, and do not require the Forest Service to pay for those aircraft when they are not needed,” Walden, Wyden, and Merkley wrote in their letter. “We are particularly concerned that LAT companies have responded to this solicitation in good faith, but have been left in limbo now for several months due to inaction by the United States Forest Service.”

They also noted that failure to award the contracts hurts the Forest Service’s firefighting work both because it lacks access to several next-generation large air tankers, and because several next-generation tankers are available at lower rates than current aircraft in use that could save taxpayer money.


6. Leanna Jean Bennett 1951-2019

flower.rose.starLeanna Jean Bennett was born September 1, 1951, in Hood River, Oregon, and was raised by her grandparents, Evelyn Viola (Graber) and Cecil Anderson Bennett. She graduated from Portland State University with B.S. degrees in History and Sociology, with emphasis on Middle East and African American studies. She did her graduate work at Portland State University and University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Leanna died on September 12, 2019, in Eugene, Oregon. She enjoyed quilting and genealogy, and during the 1980s she worked as a genealogical research assistant at the Oregon Historical Society.

Her great-great-grandparents, Craig and Isabelle (Comstock) Bennett, came west from Page County, Iowa, in 1883, to settle at Kent in Sherman County, Oregon. Children who lived to maturity were Abel Comstock Bennett, Ralph Craig Bennett, Frank L. Bennett, Jennie Cummings Bennett who married Joseph Patterson, Milton H. Bennett who married Maggie Trotter, Walter H. Bennett who married Ella A. Craig, and Isabelle Bennett who married Ormond C. Hogue.

Her great-grandfather, Milton Bennett, secured land near Kent 1886-1890, built a grain warehouse at Kent, and in 1903, bought the E. Oregon Trading Company and served as Kent postmaster from 1887 for many years. His wife, Maggie Trotter, was the daughter of Sarah (Wheeler) Trotter, who took a homestead on which the town of Kent was subsequently built. In 1901 she platted the town site. Milton and Maggie were parents of Bessie, Earl, Cecil and Ross Bennett.

Leanna is survived by Graber and Bennett cousins, and by more distant Sherman County cousins, Eilene (Hogue) Eslinger, John Fields, Sharon (Coelsch) Spencer, Leo Coelsch, Sherry (Woods) Kaseberg, and Janet, Bruce and David Pinkerton.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbCharleston Sweetgrass Basket Artist Mary Jackson

PragerU.com Video: Goodbye America

PragerU. Short Videos. Big Ideas.

OSU-Cascades study: Hoary bat numbers falling fast

Salmon Bounty

Oregon Business: Hemp Growth Divides Communities

The Other Oregon, A Voice for Rural Oregon [magazine]


 

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Sherman County eNews #236

CONTENTS

  1. Dear Mom and Dad: Cool It

  2. Would you care to dance? Learn the steps!

  3. You have a story to tell! It’s time to share it

  4. Effectively Managing Anger

  5. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week’s news, by the numbers

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Dear Mom and Dad: Cool It

By Karissa Niehoff and Peter Weber

If you are the mother or father of a high school athlete here in Oregon, this message is primarily for you.

When you attend an athletic event that involves your son or daughter, cheer to your heart’s content, enjoy the camaraderie that high school sports offer and have fun. But when it comes to verbally criticizing game officials or coaches, cool it.

Make no mistake about it. Your passion is admired, and your support of the hometown team is needed. But so is your self-control. Yelling, screaming and berating the officials humiliates your child, annoys those sitting around you, embarrasses your child’s school and is the primary reason Oregon has an alarming shortage of high school officials.

It’s true. According to a recent survey by the National Association of Sports Officials, more than 75 percent of all high school officials say “adult behavior” is the primary reason they quit. And 80 percent of all young officials hang up their stripes after just two years of whistle blowing.

Why? They don’t need your abuse.

Plus, there’s a ripple effect. There are more officials over 60 than under 30 in many areas. And as older, experienced officials retire, there aren’t enough younger ones to replace them. If there are no officials, there are no games. The shortage of licensed high school officials is severe enough in some areas that athletic events are being postponed or cancelled—especially at the freshman and junior varsity levels.

Research confirms that participation in high school sports and activities instills a sense of pride in school and community, teaches lifelong lessons like the value of teamwork and self-discipline and facilitates the physical and emotional development of those who participate. So, if the games go away because there aren’t enough men and women to officiate them, the loss will be infinitely greater than just an “L” on the scoreboard. It will be putting a dent in your community’s future.

If you would like to be a part of the solution to the shortage of high school officials, you can sign up to become a licensed official at HighSchoolOfficials.com. Otherwise, adult role models at high school athletic events here in Oregon are always welcome.

(Editor’s note: Karissa Niehoff is Executive Director of the National Federation of State High School Associations and Peter Weber is Executive Director of the Oregon School Activities Association, c.2018)


2. Would you care to dance? Learn the steps!

girl.hopDo you love to dance? Are you looking for an enjoyable way to exercise? Beginning this month, Columbia Gorge Community College non-credit community education classes will teach you the steps. The college offers courses in Beginning Tap, Jazzallet and Mindfulness Movement. Cost is $70 per course. Classes meet once a week for 12 weeks. Check online at cgcc.edu/community-ed for times and to register. Or call (541) 506-6011 for more information.


3. You have a story to tell! It’s time to share it

pencil.spiralEveryone has a story to tell. Maybe it’s your own. Maybe it’s someone else’s. Maybe it’s an issue you’re passionate about. This fall, learn how to share stories with others.

Columbia Gorge Community College is offering the non-credit class “Writing: Introduction to Creative Nonfiction Writing.” The class meets every Tuesday from Sept. 24 to Nov. 12 at the college’s Hood River – Indian Creek Campus from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Cost is just $75. To register, visit cgcc.edu/community-ed or call (541) 506-6011.


4. Effectively Managing Anger

Anger is a normal emotion and all of us feel angry every now and then. If you use it well, anger can be the fuel that drives effective and useful action. But if you use it badly, it can result in needless pain, destruction and frustration. Very few situations get remedied successfully with explosive anger.

How you express your anger is especially important if you have children around, because whether you like it or not, they will use you as a role model as they learn how to handle their own strong feelings.

Even if you were raised around people who routinely blew up and lost control of themselves whenever they got mad at each other, you can learn to do it differently yourself. You don’t have to lose control, just because that is all you’ve seen in your life.

When you feel that your rights are being ignored or that someone is treating you with disrespect, assert yourself calmly, politely, but firmly. When you do, you will be giving your children a wonderful example to follow and you will feel good about your ability to take control of your feelings instead of letting them take control of you.

Daily mental rehearsals, where you picture the way you intend to behave, will help this new behavior become almost automatic for you. Affirm yourself in words as you create these mental pictures, saying something like, “I handle potentially stressful situations quietly and calmly, even when I feel angry.” “Before I say anything, I take a deep breath, let it out slowly, and compose my calm responses as the air leaves my body.”

If your intention is clear and you use mental rehearsal daily, you will be very pleased with the results. Everyone else will notice, and their estimation of you will rise, as your confidence in yourself goes up, as well. It’s a win-win all the way around! ~The Pacific Institute


5. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week’s news, by the numbers

Oregon.Flat.poleHere are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon news stories.

  • 18: Months Oregon’s first Public Records Advocate, Ginger McCall, had been on the job before announcing this week that she was stepping down due to political pressure from Gov. Kate Brown’s office.
  • 1: Transgender people who have run for state legislative office in Oregon as of this week, according to Paige Kreisman, a trans woman who filed to run for a state house seat in Portland on Thursday.
  • 161: Active volcanoes in the United States, according to The New York Times.
  • 7: Number, out of the ten most dangerous volcanoes in the U.S., that are located in the Cascade Range.
  • 6: Number, out of those seven, that are not “adequately monitored,” the Times reports.
  • $37 million: Amount the Oregon Lottery expects to profit from sports gaming in the first three years of the application’s debut, according to The Oregonian. The Lottery, which originally hoped to roll out the sports betting application in time for the start of football season, is now delaying it until the end of September or mid-October.
  • 39: Percent of Oregon cannabis users who used a vaporizer pen to smoke pot in the past year, according to Willamette Week. The Trump administration has moved to ban flavored “vape pens” in an effort to cut down on youth vaping.
  • 6: Deaths in the U.S. connected to vaporizer pens this year.
  • 1,855: Oregonians who died from alcohol-related causes in 2016, according to The Oregonian.
  • $600 million: Sales of Oregon wine in 2018, according to The Oregonian.

6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do 

Sherman County eNews thanks subscribers who contribute interesting and thought-provoking Links which may or may not be the opinions of the editor. 

Two Centuries of U.S. Immigration

Media Bias Fact Check: The Most Credible Media Sources

Capital Chatter: Transparency flap is a doozy

Brilliant Maps: Top 100 International Tourist Destination Cities By Country

Oregon Public Records Advocate On Why She’s Resigning

Project Gutenberg…a mother of all ebook sites. Free eBooks

Internet Archive… free access to digital or digitized content: books, images, videos, or audio files.

The Economist 1943: Handwriting: An Elegy

“Directo a Mexico” via U.S. Government Banking System

9/11 Truth: Why Do Good People Become Silent About the Documented Facts that Disprove the Official 9/11 Narrative

Global Research: Who is Osama Bin Laden


 

Sherman County eNews #235

CONTENTS

  1. Fasten Emergency Information on Your Child’s Car Seat

  2. Smart Phone Camera Tips Offered in Upcoming Class

  3. Classes: Fiber Arts, Knitting, Leather Jewelry, Photography, Pottery & Sculpture

  4. Calling all aspiring poets! Online Poetry Classes Beginning, Sept. 23

  5. Corps of Engineers officials: Bonneville navigation lock to return to service Sept. 30

  6. Greg Walden Statement on EPA’s Revision to Waters of the United States

  7. A Vintage Evening Benefit at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, Oct. 5

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Fasten Emergency Information on Your Child’s Car Seat

boy.telephonetalkWay too often do firefighters come upon a car wreck with child(ren) in the car who are too young to have any info and parents are unconscious. It takes 2 minutes of your time to write out child’s name, DOB, parents names, DOB, emergency contacts and any medical conditions, any meds your child is on and even child’s doctor, then stick it to the child’s car seat. This helps EMS a ton and can also help save your child’s life. ~Rose City Fire Department, Michigan


2. Smart Phone Camera Tips Offered in Upcoming Class

Smartphone cameras are a powerful tool, if you know how to use them and discover all the photography apps for even more versatility. This fall, Columbia Gorge Community College offers “Phone and Tablet Photography and Video,” a non-credit class through Community Education. The class is designed to help you make the most of your smartphone camera. Learn how to take higher quality images and edit like a pro with in-phone apps. This course covers everything from the basics of composition and stabilization, to using specific apps to edit and score video. The cost is $75. Classes are Oct. 18 and Oct. 19 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Hood River – Indian Creek Campus.  Visit online at cgcc.edu/community-ed to register. Or call (541) 506-6011 for more information.


3. Classes: Fiber Arts, Knitting, Leather Jewelry, Photography, Pottery & Sculpture

lana-architetto-francesc-01Autumn is full of color. What a perfect time to explore your artistic side!  Columbia Gorge Community College Community Education offers non-credit art classes beginning in September. Explore your creative side by taking classes in such topics as Fiber Arts, Gourd Art, Knitting, Leather Jewelry, Photography, Pottery and Sculpture. Check online at cgcc.edu/community-ed for times and to register. Or call (541) 506-6011 for more information.


4. Calling all aspiring poets! Online Poetry Classes Beginning, Sept. 23

pencil.sharpColumbia Gorge Community College is offering three online poetry classes this fall. “Poetry Writing: Inspired by the Pacific Northwest,” “Poetry Writing: Haiku” and “Poetry Writing: Poetic Forms” are all offered on-line beginning Sept. 23. Take these online non-credit classes from anywhere, any time that works for you during the 12-week term. Each course is $100. To learn more and register, visit cgcc.edu/community-ed or call (541) 506-6011.


5. Corps of Engineers officials: Bonneville navigation lock to return to service Sept. 30

Portland, Ore. — The Bonneville navigation lock will return to service, allowing vessels to pass through the lock, beginning 10 a.m. Sept. 30, according to officials at the Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

“It’s important to recognize the patience from our Columbia River users, who depend on this critical piece of infrastructure to run their businesses,” said Portland District Commander Col. Aaron Dorf.

“This lock closure is significant, which is why our engineers, experts and contractors are working tirelessly to ensure we get the locks back in service as quickly as possible. It is not lost on anyone in the Portland District that this outage has tremendous impacts to Columbia River users,” he said. “Between now and Sept. 30, our teams will be working around the clock to construct the new sill to restore Columbia River traffic.”

The navigation lock was closed on Thursday, Sept. 5 after lock operators detected problems with the lock during operation.

Engineers “dewatered” the lock Sept. 6, performed an inspection and discovered that the downstream concrete sill, a structure against which lock gates create a water-tight seal, had cracks. The Corps then closed the lock to vessels on the river.

According to the Portland District engineering team, the damage they observed was unusual, and the annual inspections of the dam, last performed January 2017, did not reveal any abnormalities.

Portland District awarded the emergency repair contract to Advanced American Construction, based here in Portland, and crews began demolition and removal of the concrete sill, which measures approximately 5 ft. tall, 9 1/2 ft. wide and about 100 ft. long.

Work on the lock will include demolition, drilling holes for rebar, forming the new sill structure and allowing time for the concrete to cure.

For the duration of the repairs, the Bradford Island Visitor Center, as well as recreation areas on Bradford and Robins islands, (Oregon side) are temporarily closed due to the navigation lock issue.

The fish hatchery at Bonneville is unaffected by the navigation lock and open to visitors; officials encourage visitors to be aware of construction traffic while driving through the Bonneville Dam project area. The Corps’ Washington Shore Visitor Complex is also open, and features interactive exhibits, powerhouse tours and fish viewing.

For the latest information, photos and updates on the Bonneville navigation lock repair, visit the Portland District website at <https://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/&gt;, our Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/PortlandCorps <file:///C:\Users\g2pa9kls\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\INetCache\Content.Outlook\15WUXW2S\www.facebook.com\PortlandCorps> or twitter <https://twitter.com/PortlandCorps&gt;.


6. Rep. Greg Walden Statement on EPA’s Revision to Waters of the United States [WOTUS]

Today, Representative Greg Walden (R-Hood River) released a statement applauding the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for repealing the Obama-era rules concerning “Waters of the United States” (WOTUS).

Walden has heard concerns from many farmers and ranchers across Oregon that the 2015 Obama Administration WOTUS ruling was overreaching and would negatively impact their work. The old WOTUS ruling greatly expanded the EPA’s jurisdiction and control over local land use decisions. Under the 2015 ruling, the EPA could potentially regulate bodies of water such as irrigation and drainage ditches on farmland, causing uncertainty for farmers who potentially faced litigation or onerous permit requirements under the previous “Waters of the United States” definition.

“Farmers and ranchers across Oregon have expressed their concerns with the overreaching Obama-era definition of Waters of the United States (WOTUS),” said Walden. “They worried that the intermittent stream or irrigation ditch would be subject to burdensome new federal regulation. The EPA’s release of the final rule, which abolishes the Obama-era rule, is welcome news across rural Oregon. I applaud President Trump and his administration for listening to our farmers and ranchers and acting to repeal the flawed original rule and appropriately redefine Waters of the United States.”

The Administration’s new and final rule abolishes the previous heavy-handed WOTUS rules and replaces it with improved guidelines that take into consideration the well-being of rural Americans.


7. A Vintage Evening Benefit at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, Oct. 5

Columbia Gorge Discovery Center hosts A Vintage Evening “Boots, Hoots & BBQ” auction fundraiser, Saturday, Oct. 5, 2019. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., BBQ dinner starts 6:30 p.m. at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, 5000 Discovery Drive in The Dalles. Enjoy music by DJ Randy Haines, sample from the whisky, wine & beer bar, and help raise funds for the museum through this live and silent auction. Tickets $45 per person, $400 per table for 10. This is a 21 and older event. Tickets on sale now at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center. Call 541-296-8600 x 201 or visit http://www.gorgediscovery.org for more information.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Journey Through Time Scenic Byway

Oregon Fast Facts

Heritage Foundation: 8 Stubborn Facts About Gun Violence

Eastern Oregon Minnow Removed From The Endangered Species List


 

Sherman County eNews #234

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

eNEWS POLICIES:

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life. Your willingness to put it into words is all that is necessary. ~Margaret Cousins 

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

SHERMAN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM. A Night at the Museum. Limited tickets available for this fundraiser event. Local brews and local catering for a great Night at the Museum. VIP ticket holders will be bused to a surprise location in the county, receive a special brew sample with appetizers, an exclusive tour of the mystery venue and then bused back for the main event. It will be a great event showcasing local breweries that are bringing their favorite brews and an evening at the museum with dinner provided. There will also be a silent auction. VIP tickets $50 & Regular tickets $35. Call 541-565-3232. Thank you in advance for supporting this event and we will see you Sept. 14th! 

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

VOLUNTEER FOR QUILTS FOR COPS WORKSHOP. 8 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, Or 97065. 9/13

EMPLOYMENT:

CHILD CARE PROVIDERS. ABC Huskies Child Care currently has available two (2) full-time and two (2) part-time Assistant Provider positions. Applicants must be able to work flexible hours and experience is preferred but will train. For an application and further details, you may contact Mika at 541-442-5024 or email abchuskies@yahoo.com. Employment application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com.  If you love children, this is a great opportunity to work with professional child care providers in a home-like environment!  9/13 

SERVICES: 

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY     https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE:

BOOK. Now available at The Sherman County Museum Store, Jane Kirkpatrick’s brand new book, “One More River to Cross.” $15.99 | Sherman County Historical Museum | Open 10-5 May through October | 541 565 3232. 10/18

LAWN MOWER. Husqvarna 23hp riding lawn mower with 48″ mower deck, only 47 hours and new battery. $1,000 or OBO. Contact: (541) 980-3406. 9/27

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/ 

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

 

 FOR RENT OR LEASE:  

FREE:

OREGON TRAVEL GUIDES. Sherman County Visitor Center at Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro. State and local visitor information.

LOST OR FOUND:

Volunteer Smile

WANTED:

VOLUNTEERS FOR QUILTS FOR COPS WORKSHOP. 8 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, Or 97065.

YOUR STORIES. Sherman County: For The Record Calls for Stories: AFS Exchange Students! Editor Gladys Wesley is working on the next issue of Sherman County: For The Record and needs your stories. She would like to receive stories from AFS exchange students about where they were from, their time in Sherman County, life after Sherman County and what they are doing now. She has one from Penny which was on FB and is a good example of what she is looking for. Please send the stories to Gladys at the email address info@shermanmuseum.org with subject line FTR Story. ~Sherman County Historical Society

SHERMAN COUNTY ARTISTS & CRAFTERS! It is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information.


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

 The Times-Journal published the fall sports schedules and results! 

food.sack1SEPTEMBER

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 A Night at the Museum – Sherman County Historical Society Benefit 541-565-3232

14 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Meeting 10:30 Discovery Center

16 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

17 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

17 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 4 The Dalles

17 Wasco City Council 7

18 Sherman County Court 9

20 Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting 10

21 Sherman High School Multi-Class Reunion 501-258-7299

21 Quilts for Cops Workshop 9-4:30 Wasco School Events Center

23 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

23 Sherman County Photography Club 6pm

23 Sherman County Photography Club OSU Extension Bldg Moro

24 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

24 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

24 Sherman County School Dental Screening

24 Mid-Columbia Community Action Council Meeting 5:30 The Dalles

25-26 Eastern Oregon Nonprofit Conference, Ontario

26 Association of Oregon Counties District 3 Meeting 10-2 Boardman

27 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board Meeting 2

27-29 Tygh Valley Bluegrass Jamboree

flower.sunflower1OCTOBER

1 Moro City Council 7

2 Sherman County Court 9

2 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Church of Christ social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

3 Sherman County Fair Board Meeting 7

5 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

5 Car is King at Maryhill Museum 10-4

7 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation Meeting 10-12 Sherman

7 Grass Valley City Council 7 City Hall

8 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

9 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

9 Rufus City Council 7

9 Sherman County Scholarship Association 5:30 Library

11 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 COLUMBUS DAY

14 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

15 Frontier Regional 911 Board Meeting 1:30

15 Tri-County Community Corrections Board Meeting 3:30 Gilliam County

15 Wasco City Council 7

16 Sherman County Court 9

19 Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Celebration

20 Afternoon of Sherman County Talent (art show, silent auction) 2-5 Wasco School Events Center

23 Tri-County Court Meeting 10-2 Fossil

31 HALLOWEEN


 

Sherman County eNews #233

CONTENTS

  1. Notice. Sherman County Board of Property Tax Appeals Board Openings

  2. Notice. Sherman County Court Session, Sept. 18

  3. Museum Day Live! at Maryhill Museum, Sept. 21

  4. Oregon Heritage introduces Sharing the Value of Heritage Toolkit

  5. Oregon Heritage grant deadline approaches on Oct. 1

  6. The Cynics Among Us

  7. Hat Etiquette

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


 “Eight million tons of cargo move inland on the Columbia and Snake rivers each year, and 53% of U.S. wheat exports were transported on the Columbia River in 2017 … About $2 billion in commercial cargo travels the entire system annually, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and it’s the No. 1 export gate in the U.S. for wheat and barley and the No. 2 export gate for corn.” ~Associated Press


1. Notice. Sherman County Board of Property Tax Appeals Board Openings

The Sherman County Board of Property Tax Appeals (BOPTA) has board openings for the 2019-20 tax year. These positions are open to non-office holding residents of Sherman County. A non-office holding resident cannot be: a member of the county governing body, a member of the governing body of any taxing district within the county, an elected official within the county, a person employed in or hired by the county or any taxing district within the county, a former county assessor, or any appointee acting in the place of the assessor that held the office or was appointed during the tax year subject to appeal to BOPTA, or a person previously employed in or hired by the office of the assessor during the tax year subject to appeal to BOPTA.

Board members hear petitions for reduction of the real market, maximum assessed, specially assessed, and assessed value of property placed on the roll by the county assessor as of January 1, 2019. The board will also consider requests to waive penalties assessed for the late filing of real and personal property returns.

An initial training session is required for new members and for those members returning after a break in service. Board members are required to attend training approved by the Department of Revenue at least every other year unless no petitions are filed. The BOPTA board generally meets for one or two sessions during the year between February and June. The one-year term ends on June 30, 2020.

If you are interested in being considered for the BOPTA board, please contact Jenine McDermid at 541-565-3606 or by email at: countyclerk@shermancounty.net no later than Friday, September 27. BOPTA pool members will be appointed by the county governing body on October 2, 2019.


2. Notice. Sherman County Court Session, Sept. 18

The Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, September 18th, at 9:00 a.m.  This session will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039. Agenda topics include Transportation Plan, Resident Incentive Payment Amount, Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA), County Speed Bumps, Commissioners’ Reports and Consent Agenda. The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at http://www.co.sherman.or.us.


3. Museum Day Live! at Maryhill Museum, Sept. 21

In the spirit of the Smithsonian Institution, whose museums offer free admission every day, Museum Day Live! is an annual event created by Smithsonian magazine. Participating museums, including Maryhill, give free admission to anyone presenting a Museum Day Live! ticket on Saturday, September 21.

The Museum Day ticket provides free admission for two people on Saturday, September 21, 2019. Visit here<https://www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/museum-day-2019/&gt; to get your ticket and more information.

There are 20 Oregon museums participating so be sure to visit here to find an Oregon museum near you to visit: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/search/?q=&states=US::OR&.


4. Oregon Heritage introduces Sharing the Value of Heritage Toolkit

newspaper-arrowOregon Heritage is launching the Sharing the Value of Heritage Toolkit<https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/Pages/Communications%20Toolkit.aspx&gt;. The toolkit is a set of adaptable resources to help heritage groups recognize and communicate the value of their work. The more we all articulate heritage values and impacts, the more we strengthen public perception of heritage efforts, expand funding opportunities, and encourage long-term support for Oregon’s heritage.

Tools will be added on an on-going basis to provide state and national data, resources to collect and guidance on how to use each tool. Access Initial Tools:

Value of Heritage Message Platform<https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/docs/ValueofHeritageMessagePlatform.pdf>-Making the connection between your heritage work and its impact on the community is essential for building support and understanding. This guide will help you communicate both what you organization does and why it matters.

Cultural Value of Heritage Flyer<https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/docs/CulturalValueofHeritageFlyer.pdf>- Stories are powerful ways to illustrate the impact of you heritage preservation and outreach efforts. Use this flyer as an example of how your organization can pair a message, a story, and an image to demonstrate cultural value.

Visit: https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/Pages/Communications%20Toolkit.aspx for ideas on how to adapt each resource and take action.


5. Oregon Heritage grant deadline approaches on Oct. 1

wheel.wagon1The Oregon Heritage grant funds qualified projects for the conservation, development and interpretation of Oregon’s cultural heritage. Awards typically range between $5,000 and $20,000. Projects can include anything related to Oregon heritage, and priority will be given to projects that preserve, develop or interpret threatened heritage resources or heritage resources of statewide significance.

To learn a little more about an Oregon Heritage grant project, check out the most recent post on the Oregon Heritage Exchange Blog<https://oregonheritage.wordpress.com/2019/09/06/walking-tour-of-south-portland/&gt;. It features the Oregon Jewish Museum and Holocaust Education Center’s new walking tour, a 2017 Oregon Heritage Grant project.

For more information on the grant, visit https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/FINASST/Pages/grants.aspx#Oregon_Heritage_Grant_Program. Oregon Heritage grants program staff is happy to discuss projects and review applications in advance.


6. The Cynics Among Us

Some people think it is smart and sophisticated to be cynical. We see a lot of this in the world today. It’s an easy mindset to fall into, evidenced by checking any one day’s social media feed. The trouble is, cynicism does not help solve the challenges before us.

Do you know anyone with a cynical attitude? Most likely, you do. Cynics believe that people are motivated by selfishness. Cynics come off as scornful and contemptuous of anything that looks like virtue or integrity. Cynics pride themselves on having a “realistic approach” and mock those with a more optimistic view. But have you ever noticed that cynics, more than likely, are unhappy people? They are not only unhappy, but they seem dead to the spiritual values that give life meaning.

You might have heard cynics described as failed idealists who commit a kind of intellectual suicide. Now that may seem a bit extreme, but think about it. Cynics build no bridges, make no discoveries, and expect people to behave badly. They see no room for improvement, so they abandon hope and, in the process, give up their power to act and bring about change. In effect, cynics give up on themselves before they give up on everyone else.

Now, our minds are nourished by a continual supply of new ideas, which we then put to work with a purpose in mind. But if there are no worthwhile new ideas, as the cynic believes, the mind becomes stagnant. A stagnant mind is a danger to its owner and worse than useless to the community at large. It’s also a tremendous waste of possibility and potential.

So, refuse to be influenced by the nay-sayers and cynics in your midst. Hold to your hope and humor, your ideals and dreams, your compassion and imagination. For it is these things that give life meaning and bring us all a better world. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Hat Etiquette

cowboy6Do you know the proper hat Etiquette?

The popularity and function of headwear in society has changed significantly over time, and consequently, so has hat etiquette. Please refer to the guidelines below to better understand proper hat-wearing behavior.

Men Can Leave Hats On When

  • They are outside
  • At an athletic event, indoors or out
  • In public buildings like post offices, airports, or hotels
  • On public transportation
  • In elevators

Men Should Take Off Hats When

  • They are sitting down to eat a meal
  • In a house of worship unless required by religion
  • Public buildings like schools, town halls, and libraries
  • When the National Anthem is playing
  • In restaurants and cafes

~The Matador Ranch


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.bookWhy are books that shape? From Codices to Kindles, why this rectangle stays golden

Bonneville Dam Lock Closure Stops Inland Northwest Grain Exports To Global Markets

Diary of a Fit Mommy: The Invisible Mother

Oregon Schools Slowly Rolling Out Indigenous Studies Curriculum


 

Sherman County eNews #232

CONTENTS

  1. A Night at the Sherman County Historical Museum, Sept. 14

  2. Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle

  3. Help Wanted – ABC Huskies Child Care

  4. Jane Kirkpatrick’s new book, “One More River to Cross,” at The Museum Store

  5. Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series – Dowen Jones Photography

  6. Broken Columbia lock means commerce chokehold

  7. Make a Better World? Make a Better You

  8. 142nd Fighter Wing to conduct temporary night flying operations

  9. Solar Saturday at the Discovery Center, Sept. 28

  10. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. A Night at the Sherman County Historical Museum, Sept. 14

The Sherman County Historical Society invites you to the first annual Night at the Museum benefit dinner and auction. On September 14th, the Society will showcase local breweries that will bring their favorite brews for an evening dinner at the museum.

A limited number of VIP ticket holders will board a bus bound for a secret location in the county where they will be served a special brew sample and appetizers along with an exclusive tour of this mystery venue. They will return to the museum for the dinner event. VIP tickets are $50.

Dinner and auction tickets are $35, and may be purchased at the museum or from event committee members, Johnathan and Kalie Rolfe, Chris and Carrie Kaseberg or Gail Macnab. All ticket holders will receive free admission to the museum.

The evening will feature dinner and an amazing silent auction to benefit museum operations and improvements.

The Sherman County Cultural Coalition, Mid Columbia Producers, Wheatland Insurance and RDO Equipment are Porter level sponsors; Bank of Eastern Oregon and Apex Truck Repair are Ale level sponsors.

If you wish to contribute to the auction, we will be over-the-top grateful! Please call 541-565-3232, or deliver your donation to the museum with your name, the value of your donation, and anything else we will need to know. Thank you in advance for supporting this event. We hope to see you on September 14th.  ~Sherman County Historical Society Event Committee


2. Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle

Grant applications are now being accepted for the Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: September 30, 2019

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County. Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:
Sherman County Cultural Coalition
P.O. Box 23
Moro, OR 97039
Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com
Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


3. Help Wanted – ABC Huskies Child Care

sign.helpwantedFull-time and part-time Assistant Provider positions are currently available at ABC Huskies Child Care. Applicants must be able to work flexible hours and experience is preferred but will train. For an application and further details, you may contact Mika at 541-442-5024 or email abchuskies@yahoo.com. Employment application is available on our website at http://www.abchuskiesdaycare.com. If you love children, this is a great opportunity to work with professional child care providers in a home-like environment!


4. Jane Kirkpatrick’s new book, “One More River to Cross,” at The Museum Store

Now available at The Museum Store, Jane Kirkpatrick’s brand new book, “One More River to Cross.” $15.99 Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro | Open 10-5 May through October | 541 565 3232.


5. Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series – Dowen Jones Photography

Moro, OR – The Sherman County local Artist Series is featuring photography by Dowen Jones for the month of September at the Sherman County Historical Museum. Dowen has been part of the Sherman County community for years and is currently mayor of the small town of Rufus, Oregon. Dowen is an electrician traveling up and down the Columbia River Gorge as well as all over the Pacific Northwest.

Dowen has a huge appreciation for nature and the beauty in this area. With his cell phone in hand, he captures some of the most scenic views and interesting close-ups around our local communities. All of Dowen’s photos were taken with his cell phone and the quality is impressive!

The photos we have on display in the lobby of the Sherman County Historical Museum are just the tip of his large collection. The variety of photos on display are color, black and white and panoramic. Dowen is the photographer that makes the extra effort to take a photo from the angle you might not see and scenic views from places you may never hike!

Please visit the museum to see photography by Dowen Jones. There is no charge for this exhibit which is on display in the lobby of the museum for the month of September. The award-winning Museum at 200 Dewey Street in Moro is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through October. For more information call 541-565-3232 or visit our Facebook page and website https://www.shermanmuseum.org/


6. Broken Columbia lock means commerce chokehold

A critical navigation lock at the mighty Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River has shut down because of cracked concrete, meaning huge barges that transport millions of tons of wheat, wood and other goods from the inland Pacific Northwest to the Pacific Ocean for export are at a standstill.


7. Make a Better World? Make a Better You

How do we build a better society, a better world? There are a lot of ideas out there, and it can be quite the challenge to sift through them. Here is one prescription for a better world, for your consideration.

We’ve been talking a lot about raising our children to help them become efficacious adults. We’ve talked about handling conflict and adversity, and the need for perseverance and resiliency as we face challenges. We’ve talked about self-esteem and self-respect, and how important they are to each of us releasing our untapped potential. These are individual pursuits, and can easily be applied to any organization of people. But how can we build a better world?

Lou Tice was always glad to answer this question. In fact, for most of his career, he had been talking about it all along. And he was correct when he said, if we want a world with more intelligence, more clear thinking and honesty, more goodwill and brotherhood, what we need to do is cultivate these qualities in ourselves first.

There is a natural progression in social advancement from the individual to the family, then out to the community, the nation and the world. The line of progress can move in no other direction. Every time we show tolerance and understanding, all of us live in a more tolerant world. Every time you do something for no other reason than to lighten the load another person is carrying, you improve at least two lives – yours and theirs.

Every time you reach out to help someone in need or show kindness to another, with no thought of personal gain, you improve the quality of society in general. Every time you grow as a person, as a parent, as a co-worker, as a human being in community with others around you, you change the delicate balance of life on earth.

The most important thing you can do, to make a better world, is make a better you. Each and every one of us makes a better world when we step up, raise our game, and become more than we were yesterday. We don’t need to wait until the weekend, or next Monday. There is no time like the present. There is no line, no queue, no waiting – just you and your commitment to be more.

If you want to make a better world, make a better you. Starting now. ~The Pacific Institute


8. 142nd Fighter Wing to conduct temporary night flying operations

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Air National Guard’s 142nd Fighter Wing will conduct routine F-15 night training missions September 10-12, 2019. Night training allows the Citizen-Airmen pilots based at the Portland Air National Guard Base to stay current with mandatory Air Force requirements. Night flying is conducted as an essential training requirement for nighttime maneuvers. Training flights will be completed each evening before 10:30 p.m.


9. Solar Saturday at the Discovery Center, Sept. 28

sun.circleBob Yoesle will present a solar viewing free to the public Saturday, September 28 from 11 am to 4 pm at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center in The Dalles. Using special safely-filtered telescopes you can view the surface of the sun. This event is free, and will be held, weather and clouds permitting, on the museum lawn. Museum admission still applies for visitors who wish to see the exhibits. For more information visit http://www.gorgediscovery.org.


10. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do 

bird.owl3Oregon insight: Working moms carry most of the parenting load

E-cigarette deaths climb as officials confirm some illnesses caused by oil in lungs from vaping marijuana 

To Prevent Teen Vaping, Give Kids The Facts, Not Misinformation


 

Sherman County eNews #231

CONTENTS

  1. Tygh Valley Bluegrass Jamboree, Sept. 27-29

  2. Suicide Awareness and Prevention Week September 8-14

  3. What do you say?

  4. Howard Zinn’s American Holocaust: A People’s History of the United States

  5. Western Oregon University Alumni Gathering, Oct. 1

  6. Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators, Sherman, Wasco & Hood River Counties, Sept. 17

  7. Cemetery Tales, 10th Annual Performance at Idlewilde Cemetery, Sept. 20, 21, 22

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Tygh Valley Bluegrass Jamboree, Sept. 27-29

music.notes (2)Tygh Valley Bluegrass Jamboree

September 27-29, 2019

Wasco County Fairgrounds

Celebrating 20 years of Bluegrass music in North Central Oregon

2019 theme is “Thanks for the Memories”

FRIDAY from 6 to 9 pm

Open Mic & Stage Show

SATURDAY from 9 am to 9:30 pm

Workshops (9am), Band Scramble (10am) ,

Open Mic & Slow Jam (2pm)

AFTERNOON BLUEGRASS SHOW (3 to 5 pm) 

Dinner Break – 5 to 6:30 

Shaniko Preservation Guild Fundraiser BBQ, featuring Oregon Country Beef  $10 plate or two for $18, child $5 (12 & under)

BLUEGRASS  EVENIN’ ROUNDUP

6 to 9

9 pm Drawings, Grand Prize & Lifetime pass

SUNDAY, BLUEGRASS/GOSPEL FINALE

10 am to 2 pm – a Free day

Admissions—Music pass required on grounds- $30 weekend pass at Gate

Daily rates inquire at the gate

Call 541-489-3434 for more information

Camping extra, only hookup reservations are needed, call Joanne at 541-546-4502

Plenty of dryland and tent camping areas

Sponsored by the Shaniko Preservation Guild


2. Suicide Awareness and Prevention Week September 8-14

Be aware. Get involved.

September 8th-14th Follow the Sherman County Prevention page for info all week long.

https://www.facebook.com/Sherman-County-Alcohol-and-Drug-Prevention-133311610687300/


3. What do you say? 

What do you say to a friend who has had a death in the family? While this might seem an odd choice for a daily e-mail message, it is something that affects us all at one time or another. Loved ones die every day, and odds are that many of you reading this have recently dealt with this very situation.

Many people feel bewildered when it comes to the etiquette of death. Because we don’t know what to say or do, it’s easier to do nothing. But even discomfort and ignorance are not good reasons for ignoring friends or acquaintances at this difficult time.

Flowers and notes cannot be sent too soon, and commercial sympathy cards are fine if you add a personal note. If you are puzzled about what to say, look through the cards and find two with messages you like. Buy one card, and write the message from the other inside. Better yet, just look into your heart and write the words and feelings you find there.

At the funeral or memorial service, take your behavior cues from the family. Refrain from suggesting that the deceased is better off, and refrain from imposing your religious beliefs on the mourners. At this time, nerves and emotions are at their rawest, and for some, pain is barely held at bay. Remember, grieving is a process that takes time, and bereaved parents or spouses may not be able to respond to your sympathy at first.

Follow up on your card or note with a phone call, another note, or social invitation in a few weeks or months. And no matter how awkward you may feel, how distant the relative or casual the friend, death should never be ignored. The life did not deserve to be ignored, and neither does the passing of it. ~The Pacific Institute


4. Howard Zinn’s American Holocaust: A People’s History of the United States

If anyone wonders why youngsters today are less patriotic and more inclined toward socialism, they need look no further than the most popular “history” textbook in the United States, Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States — a one-sided work written from the perspective of a Communist activist that contains a plethora of distortions and outright lies.  In 2012, the director of the American Textbook Council noted that Zinn’s text had sold two million copies and was the “best-selling survey of American history.”  By 2018, it was estimated that the book had sold more than 2.6 million copies… … … continue here:  https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2019/09/howard_zinns_american_holocaust.html


5. Western Oregon University Alumni Gathering, Oct. 1

With a RSVP deadline of September 25th, Western Oregon University alumni & friends are invited to a 6:00-8:00 p.m. gathering, Tuesday Oct. 1st, at the Shoreline Room at the Hood River Best Western Inn. Enjoy beverages, food, conversation, connecting with former classmates, raffle drawings & hearing from WOU President Rex Fuller.  Please RSVP to Emily Lafon, Alumni Relations Coordinator, at 503-838-8710 or online at wou.edu/alumni.


6, Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators, Sherman, Wasco & Hood River Counties, Sept. 17

Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators, will hold their first meeting of the year noon, Tuesday the 17th, at the Portage Grill in the Shilo Inn, The Dalles.  This organization is open to all persons interested in K-12 education from Sherman, Wasco and Hood River Counties.  If not on a telephone tree, make your luncheon reservations by calling 541-478-3429 by the 15th


7. Cemetery Tales, 10th Annual Performance at Idlewilde Cemetery, Sept. 20, 21, 22

The 10th Anniversary Performance of this wildly popular event will be held September 20, 21, and 22. In keeping with the History Museum’s mission of preserving and telling the stories of former Hood River County citizens, Cemetery Tales will once again take place in Hood River’s Idlewilde Cemetery.

The hearts and souls of this year’s selected Idlewilde residents will come alive as local actors, dressed in period costumes, tell the life stories of those former citizens. The event begins at Down Manor, 1950 Sterling Place in Hood River, where you will be taken in a passenger van to the cemetery nearby.  Tickets are NOW on sale through http://www.brownpapertickets.com or at The History Museum in Hood River, (541) 386-6772.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limb20 reasons to love Pendleton, the Old West capital of eastern Oregon

Let’er Buck! How to navigate the Pendleton Round-up

Marijuana Risk to Youth

The Bend Bulletin: Guest column: The Bulletin and climate hysteria

A Hurricane By Any Other Name: What Tropical Cyclones Are Called Around The World

Border agents arrest 25 at New Hampshire immigration checkpoint