Sherman County eNews #313

CONTENTS

  1. Photography Club Invites You, Your Camera & Flash, Oct. 23

  2. Sherman County School District Communication to the Community

  3. Sherman Development League Grant/Loan Applications

  4. Notice: Frontier Regional 911 Dispatch Board Meeting, Oct. 30

  5. Taking a Risk

  6. Oregonian’s Tax Surplus Credit, or “Kicker,” Corrected & Certified

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Photography Club Invites You, Your Camera & Flash, Oct. 23

camera.35mm.blueCome and meet with the Sherman County Photography Club on Monday, October 23. Meeting starts at 6pm at the Steve Burnet Extension building in Moro. Bring your camera and flash and learn about Flash Photography.

 


2. Sherman County School District Communication to the Community

 ShCoSchoolDist#18Communication10.17


3. Sherman Development League Grant/Loan Applications

Sherman Development League (SDL) grant application forms for projects and/or programs in Sherman County are available. Grants can be applied for by 501(c)(3) and other non-profit organizations. Organizations that have received a grant from SDL are not eligible to apply until their current grant requirements have been met. Revolving loan funds are also available to for-profit entities and businesses.

Applications will be accepted until November 15, 2017, and grants will be awarded by February 1, 2018.

To receive appropriate grant/loan application forms, please submit a letter of request which includes:

• A brief description of your project.
• State if the project is a capital expenditure, one-time program or pilot project, emergency assistance or a loan request.
• Identify the type of organization requesting funding.

Mail or email requests to:
Sherman Development League, Inc.
P.O. Box 11
Moro, OR 97039
shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com


4. Notice: Frontier Regional 911 Dispatch Board Meeting, Oct. 30

Frontier Regional 911 Dispatch Board of Directors Meeting

October 30, 2017

10:00 a.m.

Gilliam County Courthouse – Courtroom

Agenda:

1 –     Approve June 29, 2017 Minutes

2 –     Insurance/Benefits Package – Jeff Rasmussen

3 –     Checking Account Status – Sandy Speer

4 –     Succession Plan/Job Descriptions – Chris Humphreys/Renee Heidy

5 –     Manager’s Report – April Stream/Renee Heidy

6 –     Quarterly Meeting Dates/Times – Chris Fitzsimmons

  • If necessary, Executive Session may be held in accordance with ORS 192.660 (1)

(e) Property

(h) Legal Rights

(i) Personnel

  • As this is a regular meeting of the Frontier Regional 911 Board, other matters may be addressed as deemed appropriate by the Board.

Frontier Regional Board Members:

Sheriff Gary Bettencourt – sheriff@co.gilliam.or.us

Judge Steve Shaffer – steve.shaffer@co.gilliam.or.us

Sheriff Jim Adkins – jim.adkins@co.jefferson.or.us

Vice-Chair: Commissioner Mike Ahern – mike.ahern@co.jefferson.or.us

Sheriff Brad Lohrey – bradlohrey@yahoo.com

Commissioner Joe Dabulskis – joedab3jma@gmail.com

Chair: Sheriff Chris Humphreys – cghumphreys@co.wheeler.or.us

Judge Lynn Morley – lmorley@co.wheeler.or.us


5. Taking a Risk

Do you consider yourself a risk-taker? For a great many of us, the answer would be, “No!” In this day and age, that isn’t an unreasonable response. In myriad places around the world, taking a risk, and failing, sometimes requires the ultimate price to be paid. However, today, let’s take a slightly different look at this question regarding risk.

In one of his many books, Leo Buscaglia wrote that, “To laugh is to risk appearing a fool, to weep is to risk appearing too sentimental, to reach out for another is to risk involvement, and to expose feelings is to risk exposing one’s true self.

“To place your ideas and dreams before the crowd is to risk their loss, to love is to risk not being loved in return. To live is to risk dying, to hope is to risk despair, to try is to risk failure.

“But all risks must be taken because the greatest hazard in life is to risk nothing.

“The person who risks nothing also does nothing, has nothing, is nothing. If we avoid risk, we may avoid suffering and sorrow, but we simply cannot learn, feel, change, grow, love or live.”

By now, you are probably agreeing with Leo Buscaglia. If, out of our fears, we refuse to risk, we also forfeit our freedom because only a person who risks is truly free. Only a person who risks can grow, because all personal growth involves risk.

If you stay focused on the benefits of the risk, instead of putting all your energy into worrying about what could go wrong, and if you consistently affirm and visualize what achievement will look and feel like, it will be much easier for you to take the risks you need to take, in order to grow and to be the best you can be. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Oregonians’ Tax Surplus Credit, or “Kicker,” Corrected & Certified

Oregon.Flat.poleSALEM, Oregon–A corrected rate for Oregonians’ tax surplus credit, or “kicker,” for the 2016 tax year has been certified by the Office of Economic Analysis (OEA) since previous public announcements. The more than $463 million total tax surplus remains the same.

The surplus will be returned to taxpayers through a credit on their 2017 state personal income tax returns filed in 2018. No “kicker checks” will be issued as there were in the past, although a taxpayer’s kicker credit may make up some or all of a regular refund check.

To calculate the amount of your credit, multiply your 2016 tax liability before any credits–line 24 on the 2016 Form OR-40–by 5.6 percent. This is the corrected rate, as determined and certified by OEA. Taxpayers who claimed a credit for tax paid to another state subtract the credit amount to their liability before calculating the kicker.

You’re eligible to claim the kicker if you filed a 2016 tax return and had tax due before credits. Even if you don’t have a filing obligation for 2017, you still have to file a 2017 tax return to claim your credit. There will be detailed information on how to claim your credit in the 2017 Oregon personal income tax return instructions: Form OR-40 for full-year Oregon residents, Form OR-40-P for part-year residents, and Form OR-40-N for nonresidents. Composite and fiduciary-income tax return filers are also eligible.

Keep in mind that the state may use all or part of your kicker to pay any state debt you owe, such as tax due for other years, child support, court fines, or school loans.

A What’s My Kicker? calculator will be active on Revenue’s website for personal income tax filers when filing season opens in January. To calculate your kicker, you’ll enter your name, Social Security number, and filing status for 2016 and 2017.

You can visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get forms, check the status of your refund, or make payments. You can call (503) 378-4988 or (800) 356-4222 (toll-free) or email questions.dor@oregon.gov for additional assistance. For TTY for hearing or speech impaired, call (800) 886-7204.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl

The Disease of Being Busy

Capital Insider Index: This week in Salem by the numbers

Oregon Capital Chatter

Are The Names Of Some OSU Buildings Racist?

Charges brought against teen in Columbia Gorge fire

 

State says it’s too early to judge unpaid tax & fine collection efforts

Chris Farrell’s “On Watch”: The Latest on Huma Abedin, George Soros in Guatemala, & Corruption in the DOJ

 

  Unique & Authentic Oregon Ranch Bed and Breakfast

 

Crop Profile for Wheat in Oregon


 

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Sherman County eNews #312

CONTENTS

  1. Spiritual Matters

  2. Classifieds

  3. Calendar


1. Spiritual Matters

church.family1“LIGHT OF UNITY” CELEBRATIONS

Baha’is around the world are currently celebrating the 200th anniversary of the birth of Baha’u’llah, Founder of the Baha’i Faith.

Throughout history, God has sent Messengers with teachings that provided Guidance in different areas of the world at troubled times in history.  They represent all the major religions of the world and come from the same Source.  They represent successive chapters of one religion from God.

You are invited to these “Light of Unity” events in the Gorge:

October 21, Saturday 5:00pm – Neighborhood celebration at the Hannigans’ home in Hood River. Family friendly! Contact Jana for more info at jana.hannigan@gmail.com or 541-490-8086.

October 21, Saturday 5:00pm –  “Festival of Unity”  at the Lyle Lions club celebrating the Bicentenary of the Birth of Baha’u’llah!  Presentation of winning essays in the community essay contest on the theme  “So Powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth.” Multi-cultural meal, music and presentations.

October 22, Sunday – “Light of Unity Festival” 3-5:00pm  – A Celebration of the 200th Anniversary of the Birth of Baha’u’llah at the Wamic Community Center. 20-minute program, International Desserts, music and fellowship.

October 22, Sunday 2:00pm – “Light of Unity”celebration at the Miedemas’ home in Odell. Family friendly! Contact Luke and Denali for more 917-514-0915 or denaliandluke@gmail.com  Neighborhood focus but open to all.

October 22, Sunday 2-4:00pm – Neighborhood “Light of Unity Festival” – Open House Social at Ronica Smith home 317 W 21st Street, The Dalles.

October 28, Saturday 6:00pm – The movie “Light to the World” will be shown at Hood River Library.  The film describes aspects of the life and teachings of Baha’u’llah and illustrates how his message is effecting a transformation in the lives of individuals and communities.

Baha’i Faith

Pat & Erling Jacobsen

541-980-7772


2. Classifieds (new or corrected)

FRIDAY CLASSIFIEDS: Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and contact information, under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.

Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory notes and Joyful News here. ~ The Editor

applause1THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

CONGRATULATIONS to Ron Mobley and Wayne (& Lynn Rathbun) Hamersly upon your induction to the Western Oregon University Athletic Hall of Fame! 

JOYFUL NEWS! [births, birthdays, engagements, weddings & anniversaries]: 

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

EMPLOYMENT:

PETROLEUM DELIVERY DRIVER. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a Petroleum Delivery Driver.  This full time position is based in Moro, OR.  The role of the Petroleum Delivery Drivers is to safely transport petroleum products and render outstanding customer service to our patrons.  The deliveries will range from commercial/industrial accounts and home heating oil to bulk and packaged lubricants.  Product knowledge is a plus.  On Site training will be provided.      As a prominent agribusiness company, we offer a competitive salary and benefits package. Including health insurance premiums currently paid 100% for the employee and their dependents, dental, vision and Rx coverage, 401k with company match, robust profit sharing plan, paid vacation, sick, holidays, and more.   The complete employment listing and the employment application are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com.  Please send cover letter, application and resume to:

Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark

PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039.

Fax: (503)536-6875  PH: (541)565-2277

Brittany@mcpcoop.com  10/27

FOR SALE:

OPEN HOUSE 520 Columbia St., Wasco, Saturday, 3-5 P.M.; listing provided by Marcella Galloway, Keller Williams PDX 541-965-1146. 10/20

1.5 ACRE LOT. New Price on 1.5 acre lot just outside of Moro. A chance to own 1.5 acres close to town but in the country in Sherman County. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. $50,000. http://www.rmls.com/report/17410095 ~ Tiffany Hillman tiffany@drysideproperty.com  12/29
PROPERTY IN GRASS VALLEY. For sale by owner. Utilities are accessible. $60,000 or best offer. Contact Deb Miller deb.miller0530@gmail.com or 509-750-9707.  12/01

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

SERVICES:

PHOTOGRAPHY SESSIONS. Now is the time to book a photo session! The holidays are just around the corner! Schedule a session now to have prints available for the holiday season. Now is also the time to capture the fall colors before they are gone for the year. Photo sessions start at $150.00. Contact me soon for Senior pictures, family photo sessions, weddings, engagements, and more. Also check out the photos from football and volleyball this season: http://www.jeremylanthorn.com/2017-2018/Sherman-Fall-Sports   11/20

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION SERVICES & EVENTS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:  

WANTED:

FREE:

CHILDREN’S CLOTHING. Sherman County has gathered an assortment of children’s clothing through non-profit efforts, and are hoping to find a local home for them! The sizes range from 0-6 years old, some random items, and several warm winter jackets. This collection will be available Monday, October 23rd until the 27th, then it is headed to donation in The Dalles. Please contact Amber DeGrange at 541-565-3461 to make arrangements to browse. All are welcome and it’s free – first come, first serve!


3. Calendar (new or corrected)

Halloween.scare.sunOCTOBER

Burn Ban Lifted for North Sherman County Rural Fire Protection District

20 Sherman Booster Club Annual Homecoming BBQ – Sherman County School

20 Frontier TeleNet Board Meeting 10 Gilliam County Courthouse

20-21 Oktoberfest, Auction & Dinner in Arlington, A Benefit for The Woolery Project

21 Appraisal Fair 10-4 Maryhill Museum of Art

21 Columbia Gorge Genealogy Society Genealogy Jamboree 10 Discovery Center

21 Wasco County Historical Society Annual Meeting & Program

23 Sherman County Photography Club Meeting 6 Steve Burnet Extension Building, Moro

23 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 11 The Dalles

25 Tri-County Court Meeting 10 Steve Burnet Extension & Research Building, Moro

27 Sherman PTO Trunk ‘R’ Treat | Line Up 5:40 | Starts 6 Sherman County School

28 Maryhill Museum of Art Tango Party

31 HALLOWEEN

autumn.treesbareNOVEMBER

1 Sherman County Court 9

1 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Kent Baptist Church

3 Public Meeting re: Aging & People with Disabilities Program 12 Senior Center, Moro

3 Free Household Hazardous Waste Collection 10-2 Wasco

5 Daylight Saving Time Ends

5 Sherman Historical Society Dinner/Program: Camp Sherman: 100 Years  2 o’clock Wasco School Events Center

7 ELECTION DAY

8 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Group 12

11 VETERANS DAY

14-16 Association of Oregon Counties Conference

15 Sherman County Court will not be in session.

15 Hood River CORE Pesticide Training

16 Soil pH Workshop 8-4 Shilo Inn, The Dalles

18 Condon’s Fall Festival 10-2

23 THANKSGIVING DAY

28 Mid-Columbia Community Action Council

tree bareDECEMBER

6 Sherman County Court 9

6 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Wasco Methodist Church

7 PEARL HARBOR DAY, 1941

13 Mid-Columbia CORE Pesticide Training 9:30-3 CGCC

20 Sherman County Court 9

21 Winter Begins

24-20 Sherman County School District Christmas Vacation

25 CHRISTMAS DAY

30 Max Nogle Dinner Dance w/Countryfied, Grass Valley Pavilion


 

Sherman County eNews #311

CONTENTS

  1. It’s Homecoming Week at Sherman County School!

  2. Sherman County Government: The Citizen-Reporter

  3. Finding the Way

  4. Eagle Creek Fire: Hood River County District Attorney’s Office

  5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. It’s Homecoming Week at Sherman County School!

Logo.Sherman High SchoolThe annual Homecoming noise parade in Moro is scheduled for tonight starting at 8:00 pm followed by the Bonfire at the school for 9th through 12th grades only.  This will end at 9:30 pm.

Sherman County School would like to invite you to the Homecoming football game starting at 7:00 pm this Friday.  Sherman County School will honor our Senior football athletes just before the game and during half-time we will crown our Homecoming King and Queen.

The Sherman County Boosters Club will be holding their Annual Homecoming BBQ beginning at 5:45 pm until the end of half-time.  They will be serving burgers, chips, and a drink for $6.00.

Please don’t miss this exciting event and help us support our Huskies!


2. Sherman County Government: The Citizen-Reporter

Sherman County government’s newsletter:

http://www.co.sherman.or.us/documents/Reporter102017.pdf


3. Finding the Way

When you are presented with a serious challenge, how do you respond? When you have been dealt a difficult blow by life, what do you tell yourself? These are important questions that all of us are going to want to answer as we develop our personal and organizational philosophies.

Thorny issues have been around since the beginnings of human history, and the power to overcome them has been celebrated in song and story almost from the beginning. (Human beings are inveterate story-tellers. In fact, we learn best, and remember best, when stories provide the foundation.)

Take the nearly 2700-year old story of Homer’s “Odyssey” as we talk today about the power of optimism. Odysseus’ son is worried that his father will never come home from the wars. But Pallas Athene, the heroine of the story, gently reassures him by saying, “Your father will not be exiled much longer… trust Odysseus to get free. He always finds a way.”

This is an excellent description of option thinkers: No matter how tough the problem, no matter how great the odds, the option thinker always believes there is a solution. Option thinkers keep trying, experimenting, and looking. And eventually, one of their efforts bears fruit. They just refuse to give up when things get tough.

When Odysseus finally does make it home, in time to drive away his wife’s suitors and reunite his family, it is one of the great homecoming scenes in all literature.

So, what do you tell yourself when you are up against a wall? What do you say when you have been knocked down by life? Instead of looking for someone or something to blame, instead of falling silent in defeat and depression, why not remember Odysseus and tell yourself, “There is an answer, a solution. No matter what, I will find a way!” ~The Pacific Institute


4. Eagle Creek Fire: Hood River County District Attorney’s Office

“When the Eagle Creek fire erupted a criminal investigation was immediately begun by the Oregon State Police. US Forest Service investigators have been assisting the State Police in this ongoing investigation. As a result of the investigation legal proceedings have been commenced in the Hood River County Circuit Court. A fifteen year old boy recently appeared and was arraigned on a Juvenile Court Petition.

Allegations in the Petition include acts of Reckless Burning, Depositing Burning Materials on Forest Lands, Unlawful Possession of Fireworks, Criminal Mischief and Recklessly Endangering Other Persons. The charging petition was filed by the Hood River County Juvenile Department at the direction of the Hood River County District Attorney John Sewell. The Hood River County District Attorney’s office has been acting in cooperation with the Multnomah County District Attorney’s office. Although extensive damage caused by the wildfire occurred in both Hood River and Multnomah Counties, Oregon’s juvenile code dictates that legal proceedings be commenced in the county where the illegal act originally occurred, which is Hood River County.

The District Attorney’s office, the Oregon State Police and the Hood River County Juvenile Department will have no further comment until the case has been resolved.” 


 5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

 

1859 Oregon’s Magazine

Adventure on the Oregon Outback Bike Trail

 

The Citizen-Reporter, Sherman County Government

 


 

Sherman County eNews #310

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman Parent Teacher Organization Trunk ‘R’ Treat, Oct. 27

  2. Sherman County Court Minutes and Meeting Agenda, Nov. 1

  3. Columbia River Indian Autumn, Nov. 4

  4. Camp Sherman, Topic of Sherman County Historical Society Program, Nov. 5

  5. The Purpose Within

  6. RSVP Etiquette for Guests and Hosts

  7. South Sherman Fire & Rescue Plans EMT Basic Class for January

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman Parent Teacher Organization Trunk ‘R’ Treat, Oct. 27

HalloweenCat2Event: Trunk ‘R’ Treat
Date: Friday, October 27th
Location: Sherman County School Dist. Parking Lot
Vehicle Line-Up: 5:40 p.m. •Trick or Treating Begins: 6 p.m.
Parking area will be in the new paved parking area next to the school.

Sherman Elementary Trunk ‘R’ Treat is Parent Teacher Organization (PTO)-sponsored Halloween event. Children are given an opportunity to walk from trunk to trunk during the evening of Friday the 27th, each receiving individually wrapped goodies from costumed car owners. Community members will gather, parking their cars in the Sherman County School Parking lot in the designated area. This event provides a safe environment for trick or treaters. All vehicles are welcome! Car owners must complete a liability release form to participate which can be picked up at the school. No registration fee, activities are free.

1. All decorated vehicles must be kid friendly, scary and loud décor is prohibited. No open flames, fireworks, etc.

  1. Vehicles must remain parked during the entire duration of the event.
  2. Treats must be prepackaged. Homemade/baked goods are prohibited. Teal Pumpkin Project treats are also encouraged for those with children who may have food allergies. 4. No pets allowed, please leave your little friends at home.

2. Sherman County Court Minutes and Meeting Agenda, Nov. 1

ShermanCoLogoApproved minutes for the October 4, 2017 regular session and the October 5, 2017 special session are now available on the county website at www.co.sherman.or.us.

The most current draft agenda for November 1, 2017, and updates will be available on the website.

Please note: Sherman County Court only meets once in November. The next County Court meeting after the November 1 session will be December 6, 2017.

Thank you!

Lauren Hernandez

Administrative Assistant

(541)-565-3416

500 Court Street

P.O. Box 365

Moro, OR 97039


3. Columbia River Indian Autumn, Nov. 4

Don’t miss Columbia River Indian Autumn, Saturday, November 4, 2017, at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum, 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles, Oregon. Admission is free. The event will feature artisans, musicians and vendors throughout the day from our regional Native American community. For more information call 541-296-8600 ext. 201, or visit www.gorgediscovery.org.


4. Camp Sherman, Topic of Sherman County Historical Society Program, Nov. 5

Moro, OR – The Sherman County Historical Society invites you to dinner and a presentation, Camp  Sherman: 100 Years, November 5, 2017, at 2pm at the Wasco Events Center in Wasco, Oregon.  Special guests of the Camp Sherman Historical Society will share some history on how Camp Sherman came about and how this magical place became a special retreat for some of Sherman County’s early residents.  Please RSVP by November 3, 2017, with the Sherman County Historical Society at 541-565-3232.  Dinner is $15 per plate and we hope to see you there!

The Sherman County Historical Museum is located at 200 Dewey Street in Moro, Oregon.  For more information call 541-565-3232 or visit our Facebook page and website: www.shermanmuseum.org


5. The Purpose Within

If your life has an important purpose, does that make you a more valuable human being?

If you are familiar with the work of The Pacific Institute, you know that we believe a strong sense of purpose is important – in fact it is vital to fulfilling the promise of the potential that resides in all of us.

Purpose, or contribution beyond self – often for the good of a community of others – provides a not-so-subtle boost to our self-image or self-worth. It’s an internal boost, because we are not relying on others to validate our purpose. So, the challenge becomes to not make the mistake of confusing purpose with worth, as many do who are continually looking outside themselves to feel worthy.

When you determine your personal worth by your job, career, family, social position, income or appearance, you create a dilemma for yourself. The dilemma is that you must constantly work for approval, love, acceptance and control, in order to feel worthy.

If you lose your job, or your children grow up and leave home, or you retire and begin to look and feel older, you may find yourself feeling worthless or even depressed. You can spend a lifetime looking outside yourself to feel worthy. The truth is, all we really need to do is look within.

Every human being is worthy, simply because she or he exists. And because we exist, we have opportunity in every second of every day to find and fulfill the promise of purpose. You see, we want to look within to find our purpose and then look outside for ways to express it.

A sense of purpose will help you live a more satisfying life, but always remember that you give meaning to what you do – what you do does not give meaning to you. ~The Pacific Institute


6. RSVP Etiquette for Guests and Hosts

Excerpted from  Maralee’s Manners Mentor

What does RSVP mean exactly?

RSVP loosely translates from French as “Please Respond.” It’s an easy request. It just means that the hosts are asking us to let them know whether we’re coming to their party or event so that they can plan seating, food, and anything else they need to arrange for our needs and comfort.

How quickly should we RSVP?

Within 24 hours. Yep, just one day! The same day you receive the invitation is best.

Wow! That’s fast! What’s the hurry to RSVP?

A fast response signals that you’re excited to be included in the event! Think of it like this. If I held up a $100 bill and asked whether you wanted it, I doubt you’d wait for two weeks (or forget entirely!) to let me know you wanted the money. Instead, you’d probably very quickly say something like, “Thanks, Maralee! You’re the best!” That’s the same enthusiasm and quickness that is kindhearted to show when responding to invitations.

Can I wait until the “RSVP by” date to respond? 

You can, but it’s kind of like showing up late for the party. Did you know that, 50 years ago, no one put “RSVP” on invitations!  Why? Because it was considered really rude.

Rude? Why was it once rude to ask people to RSVP?  

Asking people to RSVP meant that hosts didn’t trust that people would do the right thing on their own without a special request from them. But times change and etiquette evolves to keep up with current sensibilities — and in this case, necessities. So sometime in the late 1960s or early 1970s, people started adding “RSVP” to their invitations as reminders because people started not responding.

Things in RSVP world have slid further downhill, and now most requests list an “RSVP by” date because people are slow to (or just don’t) RSVP. Please respond a long time before the date. Not doing so sends a signal that you’re waiting to make up your mind because the event doesn’t thrill you on first thought!

What if you don’t know whether your schedule is going to allow you to attend?

Go ahead and call the host to acknowledge the invitation the day you receive it. Then ask whether it would be an imposition if you waited to respond until you know your schedule. If you can explain what the event is that you’re waiting to hear about, go ahead and let the host know. “My sister is flying in some time that week for a visit, and I don’t know the dates for sure. As soon as she books her flight, I’ll let you know.” If it’s personal, you don’t need to mention it.

Do I have to respond to every invitation? What about parties at people’s homes where I’m supposed to buy something?

Yes, even sales parties should receive your RSVP within 24 hours. Typically, sales solicitations don’t need to be responded to, but since this one is being hosted by someone you know, it’s gracious to let her know whether she should set out a chair, provide refreshments, and do things just for you! It’s also very helpful to the person selling the product to know how many catalogs, samples, and such to bring to the party. 

If I RSVP that I’m not coming, the host will beg, and then I’ll feel awkward!

For the guest: Your best bet is to RSVP via email.

For the Hostess: If people are kind enough to RSVP and their answer is no, accept it without questioning the reason or asking whether they won’t reconsider. And don’t feel bad about small numbers … For sell-at-home companies, the average number of people at a party is six. Ten is considered significant. Twenty is enormous. It’s the same for almost all sell-at-home companies. 

What about writing “Regrets Only” on invitations?

People are no better at telling you they’re not attending than they are at letting you know they’re planning to join you. So you won’t get a better count asking for “Regrets Only.” 

What’s the etiquette for contacting people who don’t RSVP?

As the date approaches, and you need to know how many people to plan for, it’s fine to reach out to your guests who didn’t RSVP! Script your conversation/voice mail/text as something like this: “Debbie, I’m making the final arrangements for dinner on the 27th. I hope you and Doug received the invitation we sent you about two weeks ago and that you’ll be able to join us. Please let me know today whether you can.” When you say it nicely, the other person shouldn’t be offended; after all, you’re trying to prepare things for them. You’ll also more than likely get your reply — and the opportunity to share a subtle reminder of the social contract between a host and a guest. 

Special Grace Note

When a friend RSVPs and shares that she can’t attend, bite your tongue to avoid asking her why. There could be a million reasons, and half a million of them she might not want to share! If your friend says she can’t attend and doesn’t offer an explanation, the most gracious thing is to say, “You’ll be missed!”

Let’s make it our goal to call the same day! Our timely response is our outward expression of our inward consideration!

Let’s just keep repeating, “Within 24 hours! Within 24 hours! Within 24 hours!”


7. South Sherman Fire & Rescue Plans EMT Basic Class for January

South Sherman Fire and Rescue in conjunction with Columbia Gorge Community College is pleased to announce that we will be hosting an EMT Basic Class Starting in January 2018 located in Grass Valley. This class is a fast paced 5 month course that will be every First weekend of the month from 9-7pm and every Wednesday night from 5-10pm. This class is a regional class taught by Columbia Gorge Community College students wishing to attend must register with the College. Anyone interested that lives in South Sherman Fire and Rescue’s fire district may contact the district if they would like to be sponsored by the fire department. Students who are not sponsored by the fire department are responsible for class and book fees.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3RSVP Etiquette: America’s Manners Mentor

 

11 Mysterious, Famous Works of Art

Oregon ranchers petition for Supreme Court review

True Map of France: Republic On Which The Sun Never Sets


 

Sherman County eNews #309

CONTENTS

  1. Collection of Children’s Clothing Offered

  2. Sherman High School Volleyball Schedule Update, Oct. 19

  3. Appraisal Clinic at Maryhill Museum of Art, Oct. 21

  4. Gilliam, Sherman & Wheeler County Courts to Meet in Moro, Oct. 25

  5. South Sherman Fire & Rescue Annual Awards Banquet

  6. Jealousy

  7. Cascade Youth Choir Begins Rehearsals, Oct. 19

  8. Hood River CORE Pesticide Training, Nov. 15

  9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“Nothing is more essential to the establishment of manners in a State than that all persons employed in places of power and trust must be men of unexceptionable characters.” —Samuel Adams (1775)


1. Collection of Children’s Clothing Offered

book.girl.readSherman County has gathered an assortment of children’s clothing through non-profit efforts, and are hoping to find a local home for them! The sizes range from 0-6 years old, some random items, and several warm winter jackets. This collection will be available Monday, October 23rd until the 27th, then it is headed to donation in The Dalles. Please contact Amber DeGrange at 541-565-3461 to make arrangements to browse. All are welcome and it’s free – first come, first serve!


2. Sherman High School Volleyball Schedule Update, Oct. 19

Sherman High School Volleyball

Thursday, October 19th, 2017 – Sherman will compete at the League Playoffs in Condon starting at 5:00, bus departs at 3:00, class dismissal at 2:50.


3. Appraisal Clinic at Maryhill Museum of Art, Oct. 21

Saturday, October 21 | 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (break for lunch)

Learn more about objects you love, from family heirlooms to garage sale treasures, as leading regional art dealers and appraisers donate their time and expertise in the areas of American Indian art, jewelry, fine and decorative arts. The opinions and appraisals are informal but always educational. Cost: $10.00 for the first item; $25.00 for three (includes free museum admission). Proceeds support Maryhill Museum of Art.


4. Gilliam, Sherman & Wheeler County Courts to Meet in Moro, Oct. 25

Gilliam, Sherman & Wheeler County Courts

October 25, 2017

10:00 a.m.

OSU Extension/Experiment Station

66365 Lonerock Road

Moro, OR 97039

Agenda topics include Debbie McCuin, Program Analyst for Area Agency on Aging, Department of Human Services; Mark Long & Shane Sumption of Building Codes Division; Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Support; Restructuring of Association of Oregon Counties; and Frontier TeleNet.


5. South Sherman Fire & Rescue Annual Awards Banquet

South Sherman Fire and Rescue’s annual banquet was held on October 14th at the Grass Valley Pavilion with 30 people in attendance, including volunteers and their families. Chief Fluhr and Bob Harmon handed out awards.

Years of Service award: 
Ann Berry- 3 years 
John Goleman- 4 years 
Zack Fluhr- 7 years 
Amber Kuettel- 7 years 
Bert Norris- 9 years 
Loren Renhard- 10 years 
Jim Liddicoat- 10 years 
Chuck Baker- 13 years 
Warren Fluhr- 15 years.

Distinguished Service awards: 
JR Herlocker- Officer of the year 
Amber Kuettel- Top Responder of the year 
Bert Norris- Firefighter of the year 
Jeff Whitworth- Paramedic of the year 
Zack Fluhr- Rescue Technician of the year for his actions in February when he worked diligently to extricate two victims from a car involved in a head on collision with a semi truck. 
Zack Fluhr- Distinguished Service award for his actions August 12th during the Finnegan Road Fire where he single-handedly saved a residence while faced with wind driven flames and no other fire units in the area.

Stuart VonBorstel received an award thanking him for 20 years of service on South Sherman Fire and Rescue’s Board of Directors.

Loren Renhard received a special award for Excellence in developing a training program that benefited several firefighting agencies

South Sherman Fire and Rescue received this unit Citation for their work on the multi-vehicle accident on January 7th. The unit Citation award was issued by Oregon Health Authority in recognition of South Sherman Fire and Rescue’s organization and expert first responders in providing emergency pre-hospital care under extreme circumstances.

South Sherman is committed to providing top notch medical services to the citizens of our fire district and those who pass through.
Amber L. Kuettel, Administrative Assistant

South Sherman Fire & Rescue, 109 SW 2nd Street, P.O. Box 116, Grass Valley, Oregon 97029 |  541-705-7180

www.southshermanfire.com


6. Jealousy

Do you ever feel jealous? Most of us do every so often, but it is jealous behavior, not feelings, that cause us trouble. The feeling of jealousy in a relationship is normal, but the behavior that can result is often irrational and destructive.  If you want to avoid the trouble jealousy can cause, you can start by accepting responsibility for it.

Blaming others, for what they feel, is a mistake, because jealousy is most often a product of our own insecurity and low self-esteem. It happens because we see ourselves as having less to give than the object of our jealousy.

Soon, we become unable to see our own strengths and good points, which leads to feeling devalued, depressed and worthless. The tendency to “act out” in our behaviors becomes too easy to give in to, and others suffer. We forget the simple fact that because another person may not choose or be able to meet the conditions that have been agreed to in our relationship, our inner value as a person is not lessened, nor is theirs.

Jealously ceases to be a problem only when we regain a feeling of worth and self-respect, and when we remember that loyalty in relationships can only be offered, never demanded. (When we demand loyalty, it becomes a “have to” situation, and humans automatically push back, when we feel we are being pushed.)

Learning to let go of demands in any relationship, when we believe that love or affection is based on “holding on to,” is difficult but extremely worthwhile. When we conquer the extremes of jealousy, we emerge as better, stronger, happier people and our relationships inevitably improve. And it all starts with taking accountability for our own view of relationships. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Cascade Youth Choir Begins Rehearsals, Oct. 19

music.notes (2)Cascade Youth Choir begins rehearsals on Thursday, October 19, 3:30 to 4:30, at First United Methodist Church, 305 E 11th St. in The Dalles.

Eight to eighteen is the age range of Cascade Youth Choir.  All voices are welcome, unchanged, changing, changed, male and female.  Music activities are planned to accommodate every vocal range in young choristers, children through young adults.

Cascade Youth Choir will sing American national and folk songs, traditional rounds canons, partner and part songs, including 4-part harmony,  songs from around the world,  including different languages,  original songs, and songs from the pop world that have made their way into the “Standards” of American popular culture.

Cascade Youth Choir will collaborate with Cascade Singers Community Choir to present a series of programs throughout the year, including a winter holiday program, a St. Patrick’s Day program, and a Spring Sing program.

Requirements for the group are to fall in the 8 to 18 age range, like to sing, and like to share music with other people.  There are no fees to be a member of Cascade Youth Choir.  The group is directed by Lloyd Walworth.

For more information, contact Walworth at 541-340-9858, or

lloydwalworth@gmail.com


8. Hood River CORE Pesticide Training, Nov. 15

On Wednesday, November 15th from 1-5 pm, OSU Hood River Extension Service will offer a Core Pesticide Training session for $10.

Preregistration is required. Sign up by calling the Hood River office at 541-386-3343.

Four hours of Oregon and Washington recertification credits will be available for the training session. Participants must be present for the entire training to receive credit. 

Oregon State University Extension Service offers programs to all without discrimination.  Reasonable accommodations will be provided to persons with disabilities.  To request accommodations for any of these programs, contact me (steve.castagnoli@oregonstate.edu) by November 6, 2017.


9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbWhy save small towns?

Are the salt & pepper shakers at your favorite restaurant clean?

TedEd: Why is it so hard to cure cancer?

Puerto Rican Delegate: Trump Has Given Everything We’ve Asked For Regarding Hurricane Relief

Does your favorite restaurant keep the salt & pepper shakers clean?

When & how to plant bulbs in pots for spring blooms

Europe’s New Official History Erases Christianity, Promotes Islam

Misunderstanding America and Its Constitution


 

Sherman County eNews #308

CONTENTS

  1. Services for Seniors Will Continue

  2. Notice: Aging and People with Disabilities Public Meeting, Nov. 3

  3. Letter to Sherman County Residents: Wasco School Events Center

  4. Sherman 4-H Exchange Student to Speak at National Conference

  5. Western Oregon University Names Hamersly to Athletic Hall of Fame

  6. Slow and Steady

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day.


1. Services for Seniors Will Continue

Oregon.Flat.poleOn August 23, 2017 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board of Directors determined “that the Mid-Columbia Council of Governments cease providing services under all programs and contracts.” “Further MCOGS shall continue to provide services until such time that appropriate process and transitions may be undertaken by the parties in the best interest of the public, programs, employees and the organization as a whole.”

The Department of Human Services/Aging and People with Disabilities has initiated the public process of designating another entity to function as the Area Agency on Aging and deliver services, as outlined in the Older Americans Act, Oregon Revised Statute Chapter 410 and the Oregon Administrative Rules Chapter 411, Division 2.

Aging and People with Disabilities will be holding public meetings in Hood River, Wasco, Sherman, Gilliam and Wheeler counties to share information on the process and seek public input.

Hood River

Hood River Valley Adult Center

2010 Sterling Place

Hood River, OR  97031

Wasco

Mid-Columbia Senior Center

1112 W 9th St.

The Dalles, OR 97058

Wheeler

Fossil Senior Meal Site

Wheeler County Fairgrounds

702 3rd St.

Fossil, OR  97830

Gilliam

United Church of Christ

Condon Senior Meal Site

110 S. Church St.

Condon, OR 97823

Sherman

Sherman County Senior & Community Center

300 Dewey Street

Moro, OR  97039


2. Notice: Aging and People with Disabilities Public Meeting, Nov. 3

Oregon.Flat.poleAging & People with Disabilities will be holding a public meeting to gather input on designating a new Area Agency on Aging to deliver services to seniors in your area.

Where:                  Sherman County Senior & Community Center,  300 Dewey Street, Moro, OR 97039

Date and time:     Friday, November 3, 2017, 12:00 pm

For Transportation information, please call:

Mid-Columbia Council of Governments

541-298-4101


3. Letter to Sherman County Residents: Wasco School Events Center

October 18, 2017pencil.sharp

Dear Sherman County Residents:

The citizens of our county have had the good fortune to be able to use classrooms, the gymnasium, and the cafeteria at Wasco School Events Center (WSEC), formerly Wasco Annex, at no cost since 2009 when the elementary school there merged with the school in Grass Valley.   There have been recent changes that now require us to charge for the rooms that were once available at no cost.   We want to share with you why this has come about.

  • The City of Wasco took possession of the Wasco School Events Center (WSEC), formerly Wasco Annex, from the County on July 1 of this year.
  • The County will provide some funding for the first five years of ownership. The funding is to pay for electricity, garbage, maintenance, a part-time building manager, janitorial services, and supplies and equipment.
  • After the five years are up, the WSEC must be self-sufficient, as county funding will end. All money to continue to provide these rooms to you will come from office rents, building usage fees, donations, grants, and Fitness Center memberships.
  • The Board of Directors of WSEC has come up with rental rates for all rooms at the building, based on size of rooms as well as amount of time a room is rented for.
  • Everyone, with the exception of the American Legion, will pay to rent rooms beginning October 1. We have provided the Legion a small storage closet at no cost to them as a way of expressing gratitude to our county’s veterans.

These are the facts about the future of your Wasco School Events Center.     We are doing everything possible to make this a successful and popular site for all of Sherman County.    Our job is to generate steady income to offset monthly expenses.  But the reality is, if we aren’t self-sufficient in five years, the building, including the gym and fitness center, will close down completely.

We have been making lots of improvements in the buildings, and we invite each and every one of you to stop by and see what we have been doing.    The building is currently staffed with volunteers Monday thru Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.  Our facility’s manager is on site Thursdays from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., and 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays.

Please consider renting our venue for your next event.   Big or small, we can accommodate you.

Sincerely,

Wasco School Events Center Board of Directors


 4. Sherman 4-H Exchange Student to Speak at National Conference

4-H clover1Mana Chamoto, a 4-H international exchange student from Japan who is staying in Sherman County for the academic school year, has been selected as a student presenter for a national conference.  She applied and was selected to speak at the States’ 4-H Annual Conference in Portland, Oregon, which is held October 25-28, 2017. 

Ben Sommers, Senior Program Manager at States’ 4-H International Exchange Programs, wrote that Mana’s “application was really comprehensive and well-written, great job” and told Mana “We’re really looking forward to having you at the conference.” 

The mission of States’ 4-H is enhancing world understanding and global citizenship through high-quality 4-H international cultural immersion and exchange programs for 4-H aged youth.  States’ 4-H International Exchange Programs is a non-profit organization headquartered in Seattle, WA.  They work with 4-H Youth Development Centers of Cooperative Extension in the US and a network of international partners around the world to conduct cultural immersion and exchange programs. Since 1972, these exchanges have impacted nearly 60,000 youth and their families in 28 countries on 6 continents.

Mana is hosted by the Melissa and Izabella Montesanti family in Wasco, Oregon, and attending Sherman County High School as a sophomore.  She is playing volleyball and looking forward to experiencing Homecoming week this month with all the activities and spirit days. 


5. Western Oregon University Names Hamersly to Athletic Hall of Fame

The Western Oregon University Athletic Hall of Fame has announced its Hall of Fame Class of 2017 inductees: Bob Frantz, Toby Wolf, Ron Mobley, Bobby Pope, Jessica Jones (Hemsley), Shana Lavier (Hilyard) and Wayne Hamersly. This will be the twelfth induction class into the WOU Athletic Hall of Fame.

Wayne Hamersly is the husband of Lynn Rathbun Hamersly, formerly of Wasco and SHS Class of 1960 graduate. The Wayne & Lynn Hamersly Library at WSU opened in 2000 and they are both WSU graduates.

These individuals [were] recognized and honored for their outstanding contributions on October 14 at the WOU football and volleyball games and officially inducted during a ceremony between games. The ceremony [was] held at the conclusion of the football game in the Willamette Room in the Werner University Center. For more information contact the WOU athletic office at 503-838-8449.

2017 Hall of Fame Class:
Bob Frantz (Men’s Basketball and Baseball): A member of the Wolves basketball and baseball teams during his time at OCE. Frantz was inducted into NAIA District 2 Hall of Fame and named OCE’s Outstanding Athlete Award winner in 1954.

Toby Wolf (Men’s Basketball, Football and Track & Field): A member of three sports teams during his time at OCE, Wolf was a member of the famed McCullough’s Midgets basketball team that made the district playoffs in the 1962-63 season. He still holds a school record for making all of his 21 free throws in a game against Eastern Oregon in 1962. He led the team in 1962-63 in rebounding with 182 and averaged 9.6 per game. Wolf was named all-District 2 honorable mention in 1960-61 and first team in 1961-62.

Ron Mobley (Track & Field & Football): A dual-sport athlete in football and a member of the track and field team. He ranks seventh all-time with 16 touchdown receptions and eighth with an average of 17.6 yards per catch. At one point in his career, he held the Western Oregon single-game record for most reception yards in a game with 216 in a playoff game vs. Mesa State in 1985, which was a NAIA record. He finished his football career as a two-time all-conference selection. His jump of 24-0.75 in the long jump currently ranks sixth, and his time of 10.74 in the 100 meters is currently the eighth fastest in Western Oregon University Track and Field history.

Jessica Jones [Hemsley] (Volleyball): A standout setter who helped WOU compile a 151-41 regular season record, a 14-7 NAIA playoff record and competed in the NAIA National Tournament each of her four years as a Wolf. She was named third team All-American, AVCA All-Pacific NW Region and NAIA All-District 2/PNW Region first team in 1996 and 1997. She holds the Western Oregon record for career assists with 5,296 and ranks 10th for service aces with 127 and fourth for digs with 1,745 on the Wolves all-time top 10 list. She holds the single-match record in assists with 86 against Rockhurst in 1995.

Shana Lavier [Hilyard] (Softball and Volleyball): An athlete in volleyball and softball during her time at Western Oregon. In 1996, as a member of the softball team, she was named an All-American, one of three softball players in the history of the program to earn that honor. She remains in the top 10 for single-season records including her .404 batting average in 1996 and eight triples in the 1997 season. Her career batting average of .386 was a record for more than 13 years and currently ranks fourth in that category.

Wayne Hamersly (Meritorious Service): A former student-athlete in football and a longtime supporter to Western Oregon University and the athletic department. He has been instrumental in many projects and events throughout the years that have helped student-athletes achieve success both in the classroom and in competition as well. Over the years, his family has provided scholarship dollars to give many student-athletes the opportunity to attend Western Oregon University. When the stands at McArthur Field burned down in 1975, Hamersly organized several former student-athletes and community members to assist in the rebuilding of the current stadium. He and his wife also answered the call when a new library was needed. The building the family backed financially now bears their name.


 6. Slow and Steady

Do you ever feel discouraged because your work on personal growth isn’t going as quickly as you would like? Let’s spend a little time on this today.

Many people are interested in doing all they can to develop strong and positive self-esteem, and that is a very good thing. But sometimes, there is a tendency for folks who have just started the process of deliberate personal growth to take themselves a bit too seriously. Expectations run high and personal change can’t come fast enough. The same thing can happen to an organization as it embarks on a growth initiative.

Individuals may find themselves going abruptly from relative non-awareness (or confidence that there wasn’t any need to change in the past) to total and complete introspection. They hold a magnifying glass up to every thought, feeling, act and relationship. Growth and change then get bogged down in the details.

Perhaps these folks need to relax and take it easy. Take the changes a step at a time, a day at a time. Developing high self-esteem is a gradual process, so you don’t need to pressure yourself to get there all at once. New or revised organizational mission and values statements take a while to soak into the fabric of the organization.

Artists and craftsmen work steadily on their creations. They don’t get frantic over completion. As the old saying goes, “Rome wasn’t built in a day.” Give yourself time and space to develop and rework your self-picture. In the meantime, relax and enjoy yourself. Get involved in activities you like and have fun.

If you are tempted to measure your progress, use a broad time range. See yourself today as compared to five or ten years ago, but always keep your eye on where you want to be. And remember the story of the tortoise and the hare – slow and steady wins the race. As long as you work consistently, you will get there! ~The Pacific Institute


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeWords: Use of Hyphens

Prager U. Gun Rights are Women’s Rights

USA TODAY: NFL Player Arrest Database

Forbes. Sorry Everybody, But Trump Hasn’t Instigated The Obamacare Apocalypse

Oregon Business: Why is university tuition so costly?

What Happened When England Offered ‘Free’ College

‘The People’s School’ is a must-read history of Oregon State University (review)

 

Defense News: Early Bird Brief

Military Times

President Trump Did the Right Thing by Walking Away from UNESCO — for Now

Re: Trade, Puerto Rico: Deep-Six the Jones Act

USDA Economic Research Service: Meat Price Spreads

 

USDA Economic Research Service: Wheat Data

PBS Airs Anti-Pruitt Documentary Funded By Environmentalist Group Backer


 

Sherman County eNews #307

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman Booster Club Annual Homecoming BBQ on Friday, Oct. 20

  2. Western Oregon University Names R. Mobley to Athletic Hall of Fame

  3. Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries’ Deliberations in Moro

  4. Sherman County Watershed Coordinator Job Opening

  5. Do I Feel Powerful?

  6. Notice: Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting, Oct. 20

  7. Oregon Sends Five More Task Forces to California Fires

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman Booster Club Annual Homecoming BBQ on Friday, Oct. 20

Homecoming BBQ
October 20, 2017
Sherman County School Football Field

Beginning at 5:45 p.m. until the end of halftime of the football game,

Boosters will be serving burgers, chips and a drink for $6.00.
We look forward to seeing everyone there.

Thank you for supporting the Booster Club and our students/athletes.

~Sherman Boosters


2. Western Oregon University Names R. Mobley to Athletic Hall of Fame

The Western Oregon University Athletic Hall of Fame has announced its Hall of Fame Class of 2017 inductees: Bob Frantz, Toby Wolf, Ron Mobley, Bobby Pope, Jessica Jones (Hemsley), Shana Lavier (Hilyard) and Wayne Hamersly. This [is] the twelfth induction class into the WOU Athletic Hall of Fame. 

These individuals [were] recognized and honored for their outstanding contributions on October 14 at the WOU football and volleyball games and officially inducted during a ceremony between games. The ceremony [was] held at the conclusion of the football game in the Willamette Room in the Werner University Center. For more information contact the WOU athletic office at 503-838-8449.

2017 Hall of Fame Class:
Bob Frantz (Men’s Basketball and Baseball): A member of the Wolves basketball and baseball teams during his time at OCE. Frantz was inducted into NAIA District 2 Hall of Fame and named OCE’s Outstanding Athlete Award winner in 1954.

Toby Wolf (Men’s Basketball, Football and Track & Field): A member of three sports teams during his time at OCE, Wolf was a member of the famed McCullough’s Midgets basketball team that made the district playoffs in the 1962-63 season. He still holds a school record for making all of his 21 free throws in a game against Eastern Oregon in 1962. He led the team in 1962-63 in rebounding with 182 and averaged 9.6 per game. Wolf was named all-District 2 honorable mention in 1960-61 and first team in 1961-62.

Ron Mobley (Track & Field & Football): A dual-sport athlete in football and a member of the track and field team. He ranks seventh all-time with 16 touchdown receptions and eighth with an average of 17.6 yards per catch. At one point in his career, he held the Western Oregon single-game record for most reception yards in a game with 216 in a playoff game vs. Mesa State in 1985, which was a NAIA record. He finished his football career as a two-time all-conference selection. His jump of 24-0.75 in the long jump currently ranks sixth, and his time of 10.74 in the 100 meters is currently the eighth fastest in Western Oregon University Track and Field history.

Jessica Jones [Hemsley] (Volleyball): A standout setter who helped WOU compile a 151-41 regular season record, a 14-7 NAIA playoff record and competed in the NAIA National Tournament each of her four years as a Wolf. She was named third team All-American, AVCA All-Pacific NW Region and NAIA All-District 2/PNW Region first team in 1996 and 1997. She holds the Western Oregon record for career assists with 5,296 and ranks 10th for service aces with 127 and fourth for digs with 1,745 on the Wolves all-time top 10 list. She holds the single-match record in assists with 86 against Rockhurst in 1995.

Shana Lavier [Hilyard] (Softball and Volleyball): An athlete in volleyball and softball during her time at Western Oregon. In 1996, as a member of the softball team, she was named an All-American, one of three softball players in the history of the program to earn that honor. She remains in the top 10 for single-season records including her .404 batting average in 1996 and eight triples in the 1997 season. Her career batting average of .386 was a record for more than 13 years and currently ranks fourth in that category.

Wayne Hamersly (Meritorious Service): A former student-athlete in football and a longtime supporter to Western Oregon University and the athletic department. He has been instrumental in many projects and events throughout the years that have helped student-athletes achieve success both in the classroom and in competition as well. Over the years, his family has provided scholarship dollars to give many student-athletes the opportunity to attend Western Oregon University. When the stands at McArthur Field burned down in 1975, Hamersly organized several former student-athletes and community members to assist in the rebuilding of the current stadium. He and his wife also answered the call when a new library was needed. The building the family backed financially now bears their name.


3. Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries’ Deliberations in Moro

The seven-member Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries convened in Moro on Friday, October 13, with advisory staff, director Kuri Gill, and three interested citizens, including former Commission member Sherry Kaseberg and Sherman County Historical Museum Director Patti Fields. No representatives of local cemeteries were present.

On Friday, their work included deliberations on proposed administrative rules enabling 2017 legislation, HB2516, to establish the procedures, criteria and requirements that Oregon Parks and Recreation Department will use in issuing a permit to restore, maintain and preserve an abandoned cemetery. A bulletin under development to inform the public of this process was reviewed.

Also a work-in-progress, a cemetery irrigation and mowing position paper addresses the problems with irrigation in cemeteries, the calcium, iron and other minerals in the water that stain monuments, and appropriate cleaning without causing damage to granite, marble and other materials used for monuments.

Irrigation issues don’t end there as more grass and weed growth leads to potential for damage caused by collisions with mower blades and base wear from string trimmers. The group exchanged ideas for the use of native plants to reduce the cost of cemetery maintenance and monument damage. 

Established in 1999, the Historic Cemeteries program coordinates with the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) to maintain a list of historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon and to promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries and provide financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. 

See http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OCHC/Pages/index.aspx for a wide range of resources for interested citizens and cemetery owners and operators.

Some Sherman County cemetery information can be found at Sherman County, Oregon History Collection.


4. Sherman County Watershed Coordinator Job Opening

Position: 40hrs/wk + benefits; Open until filled

Starting Salary: $29,356 to $36,611, DOE 

The Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation Office is seeking to hire a Watershed Coordinator who will be responsible for the smooth functioning of the Sherman County Area Watershed Council administered by Sherman County SWCD.  The Watershed Coordinator organizes meetings, writes and edits documents, secures funding for projects, coordinates projects on behalf of the watershed council, and may need to perform some duties of a Conservation Technician (field work, technical advice on projects, etc.).The position is located in Moro, Oregon and will work throughout Sherman County.  The position will be supervised through the Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District and Watershed Council. A full job description can be found on the Council and District websites, www.Shermancountyswcd.com and www.Shermancountywc.com. A copy can also be requested from the SWCD office, 541-565-3551 x 3. All applications (cover letter and resume) can be dropped off or mailed to the SWCD office, (302 Scott St. P.O. Box 405, Moro, OR. 97039). 


5. Do I Feel Powerful?

What do the words “personal power” make you think of? These two words together could be perceived as either positive or negative. So, the question for today is, do you see yourself as a powerful person?

What you think about personal power will influence your ability to claim it and exercise it in your life. If you believe that power means either control or loss of control, without knowing why, you will hesitate to claim it.

If you think, even subconsciously, that power is bad, negative, angry, manipulative, abusive or intimidating, you won’t be motivated to empower yourself or others. Too many people have been conditioned to believe that “power” means “having power over,” but it is really not about that at all. Rather, it is about having the power “to” – to act, influence, cause or make happen, to create and to do.

Most importantly, power is not an external force. Instead of coming, as so many people believe, from economic or social status, education, successful careers or material wealth, power is first and foremost internal.

It comes from feeling that you have the final accountability and authority for your own life. It comes from feeling a strong, vital and respectful connection to others – family, friends, community and, in fact, all life on the planet. And it benefits others as much as it benefits you.

So, take some time to think about personal power. Then ask yourself, “Do I feel powerful?” If not, why not? If you do, then the next question becomes, “How do I use my power?” There are a great many answers to that question, and each reveals a facet of our personalities, and perhaps, our souls. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Notice: Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting, Oct. 20

The Frontier TeleNet board of directors, Gilliam County Judge Steve Shaffer, Sherman County Judge Gary Thompson and Wheeler County Judge Lynn Morley, with staff, Mike Smith and Jeanne Burch, will meet at the Gilliam County Courthouse lower conference room at 10:00 AM October 20th.

Agenda topics include: Public Input/Comment; Directors’ Changes or Additions to the Agenda; Minutes Review and Approval; Financials Review and Approval; Cottonwood Tower update; Day Wireless FTN / FDN contract merge; Wheeler County Wireless Memorandum of Agreement; AOC assistance update; FTN Website update; Sherman County Fiber Optic RFP for Wasco to Rufus update; Frontier 911 Burns Paiute Tribe update; Public Input/Comment; Next Meeting Date. The Frontier TeleNet board reserves the right at its sole discretion to enter into Executive Session under ORS 192.660 (a), (g), (j), (n)(D).


7. Oregon Sends Five More Task Forces to California Fires

California fire officials sent an additional request for five strike teams from Oregon to assist with fires burning near Chino in southerrn California.

In response, the OSFM Agency Operations Center activated strike team crews from Linn/Benton counties, Umatilla/Union counties, Clackamas County, and Klamath/Douglas counties who are now on their way.

The OSFM is extremely grateful to Oregon’s fire chiefs and their agencies for again stepping up to the plate to help our neighbors to the south as they continue to struggle with an unprecedented amount of fires on their landscape.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limb Conditions at Timberline Lodge

Jeremy Lanthorn, Photography

Why There Is No Peace in the Middle East

Human Rights Campaign

 

How the Amazon Warehouse Works

“Before a standing army can rule, the people must be disarmed; as they are in almost every kingdom of Europe. The supreme power in America cannot enforce unjust laws by the sword; because the whole body of the people are armed, and constitute a force superior to any band of regular troops that can be, on any pretence, raised in the United States.” —Noah Webster (1787)

Americans Will Head to Space Again, Without a Russian Taxi

Ten Pre-European Native American Achievements

Global Population

West Point Digs Deeper Hole on Cadet Communist

Christopher Columbus: His Influence On A Brave New World Should Be Celebrated