Sherman County eNews #220

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Photography Club Meeting Monday, Aug. 26

  2. Help Wanted – ABC Huskies Child Care

  3. A Fundraising Night at the Sherman County Historical Museum

  4. A United States of America History Tidbit: Prohibition 1919

  5. Sherman Development League Grant Cycle Application Forms

  6. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle

  7. Putting Fear in its Place


1. Sherman County Photography Club Meeting Monday, Aug. 26

camera.handheldSherman County Photography Club meets this Monday, August 26, at the Sherman County Extension office at 6pm.

* Come and show us your photo entries from the 2019 Sherman County Fair

* Learn about exposure with a DVD presentation “Determining Exposure” by Rob Sheppard.

* Lowell Smith will show you how to make your Milky Way photos POP.

Everyone is always welcome at the monthly meetings.


2. Help Wanted – ABC Huskies Child Care

children.cartoonABC Huskies Child Care currently has available two (2) full-time and two (2) part-time Assistant Provider positions. Applicants must be able to work flexible hours and experience is preferred but will train. For an application and further details, you may contact Mika at 541-442-5024 or email abchuskies@yahoo.com. Employment application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com. If you love children, this is a great opportunity to work with professional child care providers in a home-like environment!


3. A Fundraising Night at the Sherman County Historical Museum

The Sherman County Historical Society event committee is planning the first annual Night at the Museum Fundraiser. On September 14th, the Society will be showcasing local breweries that will bring their favorite brews for an evening dinner at the museum.

A limited number of tickets will be offered for the main event and a limited number of VIP tickets. VIP ticket holders will board a bus bound for a secret location in the county where they will be served a special brew sample and appetizers along with an exclusive tour of this mystery venue. They will return to the museum for the main event.

VIP tickets are $50 and the main event tickets are $35, and may be purchased at the museum or from committee members, Johnathan and Kalie Rolfe, Chris and Carrie Kaseberg or Gail Macnab. Ticket holders will receive free admission to the museum.

The evening’s main event will feature dinner and an amazing silent auction to benefit museum operations and general improvements. If you wish to contribute to the auction, we would be over-the-top grateful! Please deliver your donation to the museum with your name, the value of your donation, and anything else we will need to know. Thank you in advance for supporting this event. We hope to see you on September 14th.

The Sherman County Cultural Coalition, Mid Columbia Producers, Wheatland Insurance and RDO Equipment are Porter level sponsors; Bank of Eastern Oregon and Apex Truck Repair are Ale level sponsors. ~Sherman County Historical Society Event Committee


4. A United States of America History Tidbit: Prohibition 1919

100 years ago, in 1919, the United States of America was going through an identity crisis. The 18th Amendment, which forbade the making, selling or transportation of “intoxicating liquors,” was ratified on Jan. 16, 1919, and took effect a year later. Politicians voted to enact Prohibition as a “noble experiment” to reduce crime, solve social problems, reduce the tax burden created by prisons and poorhouses, and improve Americans’ health, according to an analysis by the Cato Institute, which characterized the effort as a “miserable failure on all counts.” The amendment was championed by the temperance movement, which mainly was supported by women who saw alcohol as a destroyer of families. They carried signs saying, “Lips that touch liquor shall not touch ours,” according to the National Archives.


5. Sherman Development League Grant Cycle Application Forms

Sherman Development League (SDL) grant application forms will be available September 3, 2019, for projects and/or programs in Sherman County. Grants can be applied for by 501(c)(3) and other non-profit organizations. Organizations that have received a grant from SDL are not eligible to apply until their current grant requirements have been met. Revolving loan funds are also available to for-profit entities and businesses.

Applications will be accepted until November 15, 2019, and grants will be awarded by February 1, 2020.

To receive appropriate grant/loan application forms, please submit a letter of request which includes:

• A brief description of your project.
• State if the project is a capital expenditure, one-time program or pilot project, emergency assistance or a loan request.
• Identify the type of organization requesting funding.

Mail or email requests to:
Sherman Development League, Inc.
P.O. Box 11
Moro, OR 97039
shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com


6. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle

The 2019 Fall Grant Cycle for Sherman County’s Cultural Coalition will begin September 3, 2019. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: September 30, 2019

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:
Sherman County Cultural Coalition
P.O. Box 23
Moro, OR 97039

Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


7. Putting Fear in its Place

Nothing blocks change quite the way fear does, and when its power is greater than your power to push through it, fear is devastating. We can see evidence of this every day in the news. However, thirty years ago, in his 1989 publication, “Getting Unstuck,” Dr. Sidney Simon discussed ten ways fear blocks change, and today that information bears repeating. You see, the power of fear, unchecked, hasn’t changed.

Fear persuades you to do less than you are capable of doing. It triggers internal defense systems and fools you into thinking that you have perfectly good reasons not to change. Fear, particularly fear of making mistakes, causes indecisiveness and stops you from knowing what you really want. It warps your perception of your life and what you can do to make it better.

Fear keeps you from asking for help when you need it or benefiting from the emotional support offered to you. To calm your fears, you develop unhealthy habits and behavior patterns. Fear makes you give up one step short of your goal. And finally, fear keeps you from taking the risks necessary for growth.

Fear can control your life if you let it. But you can push through it if you can relax physically and mentally, and develop the habit of taking well-chosen risks – small ones at first, then bigger ones. Affirmations and visualizations are a great help too. If you get into the habit of vividly seeing yourself achieve success in areas of your life that are important to you, you can overcome the paralyzing effects of fear and move confidently into the well-lived life you deserve.

What fears do you have that are preventing you from positive change? Actually writing out your fears makes them somewhat smaller and easier to look at and deal with. It gets them out of the realm of your head, and onto the finite space of a piece of paper. Once they are down on paper, what steps, even if they are small ones at first, can you take today, or this week? ~The Pacific Institute


 

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Sherman County eNews #219

CONTENTS

  1. Buy Squares for Chicken Poop Bingo in the Sherman County Fair Poultry Barn

  2. Oregon’s 2nd District Rep. Greg Walden Announces August Town Halls

  3. Sherman County Court August 7 Approved Minutes Now Online

  4. Restore Oregon’s 2019 Heritage Barn Workshop, Sept. 14 in Bend

  5. The Meaning and Quality of Life

  6. Oregon State Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“Men of energy of character must have enemies; because there are two sides to every question, and taking one with decision, and acting on it with effect, those who take the other will of course be hostile in proportion as they feel that effect.”           —Thomas Jefferson (1817)


1. Buy Squares for Chicken Poop Bingo in the Sherman County Fair Poultry Barn

chicken.henchicken.familyMake sure to swing by the Poultry Barn and buy some squares for Chicken Poop Bingo. Winner gets 1/2 the pot. The rest goes to the Chicken Tenders 4H club.

 


2. Oregon’s 2nd District Rep. Greg Walden Announces August Town Halls

American flag2Continuing a series of town hall meetings across Oregon’s Second District, Representative Greg Walden (R-Hood River) announced today he will hold town halls in Sherman, Gilliam, Morrow, Harney, and Wasco counties beginning next week. Details on the meetings are included below.

“I’m looking forward to hearing from people throughout the Second District at these five town halls. These meetings provide just another opportunity to hear from Oregonians and provide an update on the issues I’m working on back in Congress. In addition to the over 74,000 letters, emails, and phone calls I have responded to over the past year, these town halls help me stay updated on the issues people are facing in our communities. This is a top priority for me,” said Walden.

These five meetings will bring Walden’s town hall total to 40 in 2019. He has held more town halls this year than most lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives according to Town Hall Project.

Walden’s upcoming town halls will bring his overall total to 188 since 2012. For a complete list of Walden’s previously held and upcoming town hall meetings for 2019, please click here.

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

WHAT: Sherman County Town Hall
WHEN: 9:00 a.m. PT
WHERE: Bob’s Texas T-Bone, 101 1st Street, Rufus, OR 97050

WHAT: Gilliam County Town Hall
WHEN: 11:15 a.m. PT
WHERE: Arlington Fire Hall, 1500 Railroad Avenue, Arlington, OR 97812
WHAT: Morrow County Town Hall
WHEN: 2:15 p.m. PT
WHERE: Heppner City Hall, 111 N. Main Street, Heppner, OR 97836

Thursday, August 29, 2019

WHAT: Harney County Town Hall
WHEN: 11:00 a.m. PT
WHERE: Harney County Chamber of Commerce, Conference Room, 484 N. Broadway Avenue, Burns, OR 97720

Friday, August 30, 2019

WHAT: Wasco County Town Hall
WHEN: 9:30 a.m. PT
WHERE: Tygh School Community Center, 57594 Havens Avenue, Tygh Valley, 97063


3. Sherman County Court August 7 Approved Minutes Now Online

Approved minutes of the August 7, 2019 Sherman County Court’s Regular Session, are now available in the Archive of County Court Meeting Minutes https://www.co.sherman.or.us/county-meeting-minutes-archive/.


4. Restore Oregon’s 2019 Heritage Barn Workshop, Sept. 14 in Bend

barnOn Saturday, September 14, Restore Oregon will host their annual 2019 Heritage Barn Workshop where barn owners will learn practical solutions from experts on how to maintain, rehabilitate, and adapt old barns for today’s needs. Attendees will learn about the history and construction of barns as well as maintenance, stabilization, funding opportunities, and preservation. The workshop will also highlight the crucial steps toward transitioning the family farm to future generations. Attendees will have the unique opportunity to experience live hand-hewing demonstrations by David Rogers, founder and operator of Logs & Timbers, LLC, who has over 40 years experience in log building restoration.

Heritage barns are an iconic symbol of Oregon’s agricultural and rural heritage. With the rapid changes in farming and ranching, diminishing resources, and loss of skilled craftspeople with knowledge of barn preservation and restoration, there is a special urgency for preservationists to partner with the agricultural community. Restore Oregon, through its Heritage Barns Task Force formed in 2011, has made it a priority to bring together the state’s most well-versed experts to share their experiences and skills. We are honored to offer this opportunity to support Oregon ranchers, farmers, barn owners, barn enthusiasts, and their allies in sharing their passion for our agricultural heritage and their ability to retain and enhance its usefulness into the future.

The annual Heritage Barn Workshop will be held in Bend at the Bend Park and Recreation District’s historic Hollinshead Barn. Restore Oregon has partnered with the Deschutes County Historic Landmarks Commission to provide this exceptional educational opportunity. Space is limited, purchase your tickets today at www.retoreoregon.org<http://www.retoreoregon.org>.

Event Details:

When: Saturday, September 14 from 10 AM – 5:30 PM

Cost: $40 per ticket, includes snacks, lunch with choice of sandwich and side, and beverages

Location: Hollinshead Barn in Bend, Oregon, 1235 NE Jones Rd, Bend, OR 97701

For more information, please call 503-243-1923.


5. The Meaning and Quality of Life

Do you believe that having a purpose in life is important? Having a purpose contributes a great deal to our sense of well-being. Not surprisingly, having a purpose can actually prolong your life.

Several years ago, a study done by Judith Roden of Harvard followed two groups of patients in a convalescent home. Members of one group were asked to care for a potted plant during that time. Members of the other group had no such purpose. Those who were plant caretakers lived, on average, twice as long as the others did. You see, a sense of purpose fosters hope, self-motivation and positive feelings about oneself and others. Purpose gives us a sense of being needed.

Viktor Frankl, in his book “Man’s Search for Meaning,” found this same result during his time in Nazi concentration camps during WWII. Purpose, meaning, or goals if you will, provided the will to live. It could be said that the need to be needed is vital to our quality of life.

How many examples can we see, when purpose is absent or taken away, that life ceases. Veteran broadcaster Andy Rooney passed away one month after leaving CBS’ “60 Minutes” program. Bear Bryant, iconic coach of Alabama’s football team for 24 years, passed a mere 28 days after retiring. Retiring from something and not to something may have been the catalyst.

Now it is important to remember that, if it’s going to be truly meaningful, your life’s purpose must be something that is chosen freely by you, not something that is chosen for you. And it may have nothing whatever to do with what you do for a living, although, if it does that would be ideal. The whole point is getting outside of ourselves, and doing something beyond our own personal gain.

Have you thought about what your purpose is? Have you tried to put it into words? If not, take the time to do so, and then use that purpose as a compass to guide your activities. You will be surprised at how much energy you’ll have and clarity you’ll feel.

One more thing: chronological age has nothing to do with finding purpose in your life. If you are wondering when you can start – well, today will do just fine! ~The Pacific Institute


6. Oregon State Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

Oregon.Flat.pole22 August 2019 | Written by Oregon Capital Insider

Here are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon news stories.

  • $3,371: Amount an aide to Portland Mayor Ted Wheelerspent on three nights of lodging while attending South by Southwest, according to The Oregonian.
  • 60:Percent of state income taxes that are collected from people in the Portland metro area, according to Willamette Week.
  • 5,000:Classified employees at Oregon’s seven public universities. Those workers, represented by SEIU Local 503, could go on strike next month if they don’t reach an agreement they find satisfactory with university management.
  • $36,000:Median salary for those workers.
  • $717,500:Base salary for Rob Mullens, the athletic director at the University of Oregon, according to Willamette Week, reporting on a recent Washington Post column criticizing college coaches’ stay at a Ritz resort in Southern California for a committee conference.
  • 31:People on death row in Oregon, according to The Oregonian.
  • $9 million:Amount Oregon will spend toward refurbishing the Interstate 5 bridge across the Columbia River, according to The Oregonian.
  • 8:Oregon state troopers per 100,000 residents, one of the lowest ratios in the country, according to KMTR.
  • $80 million:Amount the legislature approved for 100 new troopers by 2021, KMTR reports.
  • $120,000:Amount Gov. Kate Brown — who cannot run for reelection in 2022 — has fundraised from business donors, according to OPB.

7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.talkBrilliant Maps: If European Borders Were Drawn By DNA Instead Of Ethnicity

Slavery In America Did Not Begin In 1619, And Other Things The New York Times Gets Wrong

Mysterious Oregon cattle killings, mutilations alarm ranchers


 

Sherman County eNews #213

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

eNEWS POLICIES:

FREE CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

thankyou.guy

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES: 

THANK YOU! Bryan, Forest, Scott and Kari Peters would like to thank all who helped with wheat harvest this year while Bryan was recovering.  We hope we didn’t forget anyone, if so, we apologize.  Thank you very much to:  Rick Jauken, Taner Elliot, Garrett Peters, Justin Miller, Nate Smith, Charlie Miller, Ryder Smith, Colton Shull, Ryan Thompson, LP McClennan, Max McClennan, Colton Kock, Cody Jauken, Sarah Bibby, Jeff Kaser, Amy Mcnamee, Gary Shull, Dee Richelderfer, Don Hilderbrand, Josh Hilderbrand, Rory Wilson, Travis and Michelle Lawrence.  It was amazing to have so many people come to help and offer to help. We really appreciate all the support from this awesome community!

THANK YOU for the generous donations to sponsor the bounce house at the 2019 Sherman County Fair. The bounce house will be open: Thursday August 22nd from 1:00 to 7:00 p.m. and Friday August 23rd and Saturday August 24th from 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.  Bring the whole family to the fair for fun and to help support our local 4-H and FFA members. ~Sherman County Fair Board

THANK YOU Sherman County 4-H for posting 4-H photos to Facebook for those of us who are not there! Pictures of hard work, success and pride! ~Larry and Sherry

CONGRATULATIONS & THANK YOU, 2019 Sherman County Fair Grand Marshals Leo & Krista Coelsch and Mark & Sharon Spencer, Sherman County Fair Queen Shelby, and Sherman County Fair Board!  ~Larry and Sherry 

THANK YOU! SPONSORS of the SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR: Apex Auto & Truck Repair, Azure, Bandit Glass, Bank of Eastern Oregon, Boot Barn, Coastal, Fritts Crop Insurance, Gorge Outfitters Supply, Grand Central, Grass Valley Country Market, Griffith Motors, GUUD Mfg., Lucas Oil, Mid Columbia Producers, Morrow County Grain Growers, Rolfe’s Angus Acres, Sherman County Drug and Alcohol Prevention Coalition, Sherman County Historical Society, Sherman County Medical Clinic, Sherman County SWCD, The Times-Journal, Wasco Market. 

THANK YOU, SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR VOLUNTEERS!

THANK YOU, CATHY BROWN & JAMIE WILSON!  The Sherman County Senior & Community Center extends a special thank you to Cathy Brown and Jamie Wilson of WB Ranch for their generous donation of beef. We received 380 pounds of local beef, and only had to pay the cut, wrap and kill fee, which allows us to serve good quality local beef to our seniors over the next year. Thank you so much for your generosity and your donation to the community!  ~Kari Pinkerton Silcox, Sherman County Senior Center, PO Box 352, Moro, OR 97039 | 541-565-3191 | kari@shermancounty.net

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

SHERMAN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM. A Night at the Museum. Limited tickets available for this fundraiser event. Local brews and local catering for a great Night at the Museum. VIP ticket holders will be bused to a surprise location in the county, receive a special brew sample with appetizers, an exclusive tour of the mystery venue and then bused back for the main event. It will be a great event showcasing local breweries that are bringing their favorite brews and an evening at the museum with dinner provided. There will also be a silent auction. VIP tickets $50 & Regular tickets $35. Call 541-565-3232. Thank you in advance for supporting this event and we will see you Sept. 14th!

WASCO SCHOOL EVENTS CENTER – SHERMAN COUNTY ARTISTS & CRAFTERS! It is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information. 8/30

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

VOLUNTEER FOR QUILTS FOR COPS WORKSHOP. 8 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, OR 97065.

sign.helpwanted

EMPLOYMENT:

CHILD CARE PROVIDERS. ABC Huskies Child Care currently has available two (2) full-time and two (2) part-time Assistant Provider positions. Applicants must be able to work flexible hours and experience is preferred but will train. For an application and further details, you may contact Mika at 541-442-5024 or email abchuskies@yahoo.com. Employment application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com If you love children, this is a great opportunity to work with professional child care providers in a home-like environment!  9/13

SERVICES: 

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

FOR SALE:

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE:

OREGON TRAVEL GUIDES. Sherman County Visitor Center at Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro. State and local visitor information.

LOST OR FOUND:

WANTED:

VOLUNTEERS FOR QUILTS FOR COPS WORKSHOP. 8 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, Or 97065.

YOUR STORIES. Sherman County: For The Record Calls for Stories: AFS Exchange Students! Editor Gladys Wesley is working on the next issue of Sherman County: For The Record and needs your stories. She would like to receive stories from AFS exchange students about where they were from, their time in Sherman County, life after Sherman County and what they are doing now. She has one from Penny which was on FB and is a good example of what she is looking for. Please send the stories to Gladys at the email address info@shermanmuseum.org with subject line FTR Story. ~Sherman County Historical Society

SHERMAN COUNTY ARTISTS & CRAFTERS! It is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information.


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

AUGUST

prize.bluerib20-24 Sherman County Fair

23 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Livestock Showmanship 8

23 Sherman County Fair Bull Riding 7:30

24 Sherman County DUII Prevention Walk 8 a.m. Moro

24 Sherman County Fair Kids’ Games 8:30

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H Grand Champion All-Around Showmanship 12:30, 4-H & FFA Awards, Livestock Auction Sale 3-4, Demolition Derby 7:30 and Dance with Countryfied 9:30.

26 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 11

26 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

26 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Bldg., Moro

27 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

27 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

27 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

27 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

28 Representative Walden Town Hall 9 Bob’s Texas T-Bone, Rufus

29 Sherman County School Back to School Night 6:30

30-31 Meet and Greet Wasco-Sherman Extension Crops Agent Candidates

31 Deadline Sherman County Resident Incentive Application

31 Rummage Sale 10-3 Wasco School Events Center

31 Painted Hills Festival in Mitchell, Oregon 

pencil.spiralSEPTEMBER

1 Rummage Sale 11-3 Wasco School Events Center

2 LABOR DAY

2 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

3 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

3 Sherman County School 1st Day

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting Moro Presbyterian Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

7 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

7 Night on the North Bank, Maryhill Museum’s Annual Benefit Auction

7 RiverFest: Our Rivers, Our Way of Life 10-4 Columbia Park, Kennewick

9 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

9 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

10 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

10 Sherman County Watershed Council 8 a.m.

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation Board 8:30

10 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

11 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 A Night at the Museum – Sherman County Historical Society Benefit 541-565-3232

14 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Meeting 10:30 Discovery Center

16 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

17 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

17 Wasco City Council 7

18 Sherman County Court 9

20 Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting 10

21 Sherman High School Multi-Class Reunion 501-258-7299

21 Quilts for Cops Workshop 9-4:30 Wasco School Events Center

23 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

24 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

24 Sherman County School Dental Screening

25-26 Eastern Oregon Nonprofit Conference, Ontario

26 Association of Oregon Counties District 3 Meeting 10-2 Boardman

26 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board Meeting 4 Hood River


 

Sherman County eNews #217

CONTENTS

  1. The Times-Journal: Grass Valley Market Offers Food at Sherman County Fair

  2. Tonight at the Sherman County Fair, Down on the Farm Chore Course 7 p.m.

  3. Help Wanted – ABC Huskies Child Care

  4. Goldendale Library to Feature Printmakers for Final Art Exhibit of the Year

  5. The Dalles Kiwanis Steak Feed, Sept. 5

  6. Oregon’s Top 25 Most Expensive and Most Prescribed Drugs

  7. Partners to Improve Public Access along the John Day Wild and Scenic River

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. The Times-Journal: Grass Valley Market Offers Food at Sherman County Fair

sign.food


2. Tonight at the Sherman County Fair, Down on the Farm Chore Course 7 p.m.

boy.farm


3. Help Wanted – ABC Huskies Child Care

sign.helpwantedABC Huskies Child Care currently has available two (2) full-time and two (2) part-time Assistant Provider positions. Applicants must be able to work flexible hours and experience is preferred but will train. For an application and further details, you may contact Mika at 541-442-5024 or email abchuskies@yahoo.com. Employment application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com. If you love children, this is a great opportunity to work with professional child care providers in a home-like environment!


4. Goldendale Library to Feature Printmakers for Final Art Exhibit of the Year

GOLDENDALE, Wash. – The Goldendale Community Library partnered with Maryhill Museum of Art this year on a giant printmaking project called the Exquisite Gorge Project. To celebrate the project and the art form of carving and printing, the library is featuring local and regional printmakers and their original works for its final exhibit of the year.

The Printmakers Exhibit will run from September 16 through November 15 in the Camplan Community Room. The deadline to submit art is 5:00 pm on Friday, September 6th. The guidelines for submitting art is included in the Call for Art. Artists can pick up the Call for Art and a submission form at the library during open hours.  For more information, contact Erin Krake at the library, 509-773-4487.


5. The Dalles Kiwanis Steak Feed, Sept. 5

The Dalles Kiwanis Club hosts its 64th annual Steak Feed Thursday after Labor Day, this year Sept. 5, from 5 to 7 p.m. at Sorosis Park.  The Steak Feed is the club’s major fund-raiser for community projects serving children and youth.  Adult meals include an eight ounce sirloin steak, baked potato, coleslaw, roll, dessert and drink for $15.  Free meal for children 12 and under features a hot dog, potato chips, drink and ice cream.  There will be activities for children and musical entertainment for everyone featuring the Dufur Boys.  Tickets are available from Kiwanis members or may be purchased at the Habitat ReStore, 1001 W. 6th St., The Dalles. Tickets also may be purchased in the park Sept. 5th.


6. Oregon’s Top 25 Most Expensive and Most Prescribed Drugs

~Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services

(Salem) – The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation has released the lists of Oregon’s most expensive and most prescribed drugs, as well as the prescription drugs that cause the greatest increase to health insurance plan spending.

Brand-name drugs such as Humira and Enbrel, prescriptions commonly prescribed for rheumatoid arthritis, topped the lists of most expensive and greatest increase to plan spending.  Hydrocodone-Acetaminophen, a pain reliever, was the most prescribed, along with several generic drugs treating conditions such as high blood pressure and cholesterol.

“These lists highlight the goal of the drug price transparency program,” said Andrew Stolfi, insurance commissioner. “They provide a first step to transparency for Oregonians, and help all of us better understand which prescription drugs affect health care costs.”

Each of Oregon’s nine insurance companies submitted the drug lists to the division, which reviewed and aggregated them to provide consumers a look at the common prescription drugs that have the biggest effect on health insurance costs.

The Prescription Drug Price Transparency Act (House Bill 4005), from the 2018 Legislative Session, established Oregon’s drug price transparency program. The new law requires prescription drug manufacturers and health insurance companies to report specific drug price information to the division.

Another key component to the program is consumer reporting of price increases. All Oregonians are encouraged to report an increase in the cost of their prescription drugs one of three ways:

The division is excited to bring one of the nation’s first prescription drug price transparency programs to Oregon. Top 25 lists and drug price information from manufacturers is now available by visiting dfr.oregon.gov/drugtransparency and clicking the Data box.

Later this year, the division will also hold a public hearing and begin providing annual reports to the legislature based on all the information received from manufacturers, health insurers, and consumers.

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.


7. Partners to Improve Public Access along the John Day Wild and Scenic River

Acquisition of more than 11,000 acres will expand boating access to John Day River and open up thousands of acres of previously inaccessible public land for hunting, fishing and outdoor recreation.

PRINEVILLE, Ore. – The Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today announced the final phase of the John Day Wild and Scenic River land acquisition, which consists of transferring 11,149 acres from the Western Rivers Conservancy. Adding these lands to public ownership creates another access point for boaters on the John Day River and offers augmented road access for hunting, fishing, hiking, camping, mountain biking, and horseback riding. The acquisition also opens up an additional 2,000 acres of public lands previously surrounded by private land and inaccessible to the public.

“I applaud the BLM for the years of work and collaboration that went into completing this multiphase significant acquisition along Oregon’s John Day River,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt. “This area provides a rich variety of recreation opportunities throughout the year including hunting, fishing, horseback riding, hiking, skiing, camping, and whitewater rafting – pursuits that are also vital to the state’s economy.”

“Managing public lands for the benefit of all Americans requires collaboration among private landowners, conservation and recreation groups, and local, state, tribal, and federal governments,” said BLM Deputy Director for Policy and Programs William Perry Pendley. “This acquisition along the John Day River is a great example of these public-private partnerships and what we can achieve by working together.”

“This is a momentous achievement for the John Day River and recreationists alike,” said Sue Doroff, President of Western Rivers Conservancy. “People can now experience a spectacular stretch of one of the West’s great Wild and Scenic River corridors. At the same time, they can take pride in knowing that the lands they’re exploring are protected for the fish and wildlife—animals they will very likely see while visiting this special place,” continued Doroff.

The acquisition increases outdoor recreation opportunities and enhances conservation stewardship in support of Secretary’s Order 3366, Increasing Recreation Opportunities on Lands and Waters Managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior and Secretary’s Order 3347, Conservation Stewardship and Outdoor Recreation.

The John Day Wild and Scenic River is the second longest free-flowing river in the continental United States and hosts one of the few remaining wild fish runs in the Pacific Northwest. From its headwaters to Camas Creek, the North Fork of the river is one of the most important rivers in northeast Oregon for the production of anadromous fish, including endangered bull trout and summer steelhead, along with chinook salmon, redband trout, and westslope cutthroat trout. Wildlife found along the river’s corridor include mule deer, elk, and black bears, along with peregrine falcons and bald eagles.

In 2018, outdoor recreation in Oregon generated $16.4 billion in consumer spending, supporting an estimated 172,000 direct jobs and resulting in $749 million in state and local tax revenues for local communities and visitors from throughout the country and the world.

This acquisition from the Western Rivers Conservancy (WRC) was made possible by an $8 million allocation from the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). The LWCF, funded in large part by a portion of the federal revenues from offshore oil and gas development, supports the protection of federal public lands and waters and voluntary conservation on private land. The LWCF investments secure public access, improve recreational opportunities, and preserve ecosystem benefits for local communities.

In December 2014, WRC purchased the 14,148-acre Rattray Ranch which spans four miles of Thirtymile Creek and nearly two miles of the John Day River. In 2018, WRC purchased 2,939 acres of the Campbell Ranch, which spans an additional five miles of Thirtymile Creek, immediately upstream. WRC successfully transferred the first 4,083 acres of the ranch to the BLM in early 2018. Transfer of the remaining 11,149 acres will complete the acquisition process.

The completed acquisition will enable the conservation and restoration of four miles of Thirtymile creek, while improving steelhead habitat, and ensuring the stream remains a permanent source of cold water for the John Day. The project will also conserve 10 miles of river frontage along the John Day River itself and expand access for recreation and exploration. The Rattray Ranch lies at the heart of the John Day’s best habitat for California bighorn sheep, supporting an estimated 600 to 650 head, the largest herd in Oregon. Bighorn sheep are highly vulnerable to disease and can experience steep population declines as a result. Conserving high-quality habitat for these animals is key to their long-term vitality. The ranch is also home to Rocky Mountain elk, mule deer, pronghorn antelope and mountain lion, as well as raptors, upland game birds and numerous sensitive bird species.

The newly acquired area and its boat launch will be managed by the BLM’s Prineville District. Interim guidance will be provided by the John Day Basin Resource Management Plan, and Prineville District specialists will evaluate the new lands for road conditions, cultural resources, recreation needs, fish and wildlife habitat, grazing opportunities, and other resource objectives.

For more information, please contact the Prineville District at (541) 416-6700 or by email at blm_or_pr_mail@blm.gov.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeWe Must Say No to the 1619 Project in Schools

Facebook censorship blocking conservative thought from the national dialogue

Howard Zinn’s Anti-American Propaganda Takes Over The Smithsonian

Lead Scrubbed From Paris Streets As Notre Dame Work Resumes

Military Times

U.S. Defense News

Heritage Foundation Explains: Safeguarding the Electoral Process

How Federalism Is Making a Difference on Western Lands

Stanford’s Sapolsky On Depression in U.S. (Full Lecture)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NOAgplgTxfc


 

Sherman County eNews #216

CONTENTS

  1. A Fundraising Night at the Sherman County Historical Museum, Sept. 14

  2. A Line in the Sand

  3. Oregon Cemetery Association Conference in Hood River, Oct. 17-18

  4. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. A Fundraising Night at the Sherman County Historical Museum

The Sherman County Historical Society event committee is planning the first annual Night at the Museum Fundraiser. On September 14th, the Society will be showcasing local breweries that will bring their favorite brews for an evening dinner at the museum.

A limited number of tickets will be offered for the main event and a limited number of VIP tickets. VIP ticket holders will board a bus bound for a secret location in the county where they will be served a special brew sample and appetizers along with an exclusive tour of this mystery venue. They will return to the museum for the main event.

VIP tickets are $50 and the main event tickets are $35 and may be purchased at the museum or from committee members, Johnathan and Kalie Rolfe, Chris and Carrie Kaseberg or Gail Macnab. Ticket holders will receive free admission to the museum.

The evening’s main event will feature dinner and an amazing silent auction to benefit museum operations and general improvements. If you wish to contribute to the auction, we would be over-the-top grateful! Please deliver your donation to the museum with your name, the value of your donation, and anything else we will need to know. Thank you in advance for supporting this event. We hope to see you on September 14th.

The Sherman County Cultural Coalition, Mid Columbia Producers, Wheatland Insurance and RDO Equipment are Porter level sponsors; Bank of Eastern Oregon and Apex Truck Repair are Ale level sponsors. ~Sherman County Historical Society Event Committee

A little history tidbit … 100 years ago, in 1919, the United States of America was going through an identity crisis. The 18th Amendment, which forbade the making, selling or transportation of “intoxicating liquors,” was ratified on Jan. 16, 1919, and took effect a year later. Politicians voted to enact Prohibition as a “noble experiment” to reduce crime, solve social problems, reduce the tax burden created by prisons and poorhouses, and improve Americans’ health, according to an analysis by the Cato Institute, which characterized the effort as a “miserable failure on all counts.” The amendment was championed by the temperance movement, which mainly was supported by women who saw alcohol as a destroyer of families. They carried signs saying, “Lips that touch liquor shall not touch ours,” according to the National Archives.


2. A Line in the Sand

Living in a society that operates from racist and sexist values is no laughing matter – as is evidenced practically every day in the news. Everybody likes to enjoy a good laugh, and everybody wants to feel that they are a part of a happy group of friends. But what about the times when the laugh seems to be at someone else’s expense?

What do you do when you hear a friend tell a joke that plays on physical, racial, ethnic or gender stereotypes? What do you do when you are chatting with a group of pals and someone makes a remark that indicates intolerance, bigotry or sexism? You sell yourself and our society short if you join these “We’re OK, they aren’t OK” sessions.

For the sake of your own self-esteem and that of a constructive society focused on a positive future, you owe it to yourself to be decent and fair and insist that others be the same way in your presence. For the sake of your own self-respect, refrain from telling, laughing at, or in any way going along with racial, ethnic, religious or gender jokes, or to any practices whatsoever that are intended to demean rather than enhance another human being.

Walk away from them. Stare them down. Make them unacceptable in your homes, places of worship, and the workplace. Perhaps we aren’t all equally guilty, but we are all equally responsible for building a decent and just society – regardless of where we live. The world is too small a place now to allow this poorly-disguised hatred to fester. And in a time when cooperation is the path to solutions to the world’s challenges, we really don’t need anything else to further separate us.

Racism, sexism, and other forms of bigotry and intolerance undermine our strength, and weaken the fibers of our society. Draw this line in the sand, so to speak – one that you refuse to cross. Perhaps this is one “in-group” you don’t need to feel a part of today. ~The Pacific Institute


2. Oregon Cemetery Association Conference in Hood River, Oct. 17-18

Oregon Cemetery Association

Community Stewardship | Heritage | Caring for the Deceased | Remembrance

2019 Fall Conference

Registration is now open for our 2019 Fall Conference in Hood River!

https://www.oregoncemeteries.com/fall-conference-2019.html

This year’s focus is on the “greening” of the industry. Our first night includes a fun evening of bowling and beer (or alternate beverage.) If you have not yet reserved your hotel room at our specially negotiated rate, please do so by August 31st. We encourage you to forward this email to interested colleagues.


4. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.talkSherman County Fair

Genealogy Trails: Sherman County Elected Officials 1918

Malheur County, Oregon town officials ask sheriff to investigate reporters

Malheur Enterprise

Lars Larson Show re: Malheur Enterprise: Should County Officials Chill Free Speech by Threatening Investigation for After Hours Calls

Nearly 900 migrants found at Texas facility with 125-person capacity: DHS watchdog

80% of high school students believe ag science ed is important

Washington, Oregon should be careful with pot tax money, Pew study warns

Oregon’s immigrants see trouble in new Trump green card rules

Redmond moving forward with legalizing hemp production

Grassroots Pulse


 

Sherman County eNews #215

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Fair Action Begins, Aug. 20

  2. Sherman County Fair Bounce House, Aug. 22-24

  3. Sherman Development League Grant Cycle Application Forms

  4. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle

  5. Lightening the Load

  6. Construction Contractors Board Reveals Unlicensed Portland Area Contractor Activity

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County Fair Action Begins, Aug. 20

4-H clover1The action begins tomorrow, Tuesday, August 20th, with the 4-H static and horse judging and 4-H gaming.

Bring open class entries between 11 and 6 o’clock on Wednesday, the 21st… hay, grains, livestock, land products, kitchen products, clothing and needlecraft, arts, crafts and hobbies and photography and entries for Kids Corner. See old and new friends on the midway and check out the Dale Coles Classic Car Show, enjoy burgers and hot dogs prepared by fair board members, the 4-H style show and the evening cattle sorting event! See www.shermancountyfairfun.com!


2. Sherman County Fair Bounce House, Aug. 22-24

children.cartoonThe Sherman County Fair board thanks generous donors for sponsoring the bounce house at the fair. The bounce house will be open:

  • Thursday, August 22nd from 1:00 to 7:00 p.m.
  • Friday, August 23rd and Saturday, August 24th from 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Bring the whole family to the fair for fun and to support open class exhibitors and our local 4-H and FFA members! ~Sherman County Fair Board


3. Sherman Development League Grant Cycle Application Forms

Sherman Development League (SDL) grant application forms will be available September 3, 2019, for projects and/or programs in Sherman County. Grants can be applied for by 501(c)(3) and other non-profit organizations. Organizations that have received a grant from SDL are not eligible to apply until their current grant requirements have been met. Revolving loan funds are also available to for-profit entities and businesses.

Applications will be accepted until November 15, 2019, and grants will be awarded by February 1, 2020.

To receive appropriate grant/loan application forms, please submit a letter of request which includes:

• A brief description of your project.
• State if the project is a capital expenditure, one-time program or pilot project, emergency assistance or a loan request.
• Identify the type of organization requesting funding.

Mail or email requests to:
Sherman Development League, Inc.
P.O. Box 11
Moro, OR 97039
shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com


4. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle

The 2019 Fall Grant Cycle for Sherman County’s Cultural Coalition will begin September 3, 2019. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: September 30, 2019

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:
Sherman County Cultural Coalition
P.O. Box 23
Moro, OR 97039

Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


5. Lightening the Load

Most of us can handle physical pain, at least up to a point. But when it comes to rejection or disapproval, it is often another story. Today, let’s talk more about handling psychological pain.

Most of us deal pretty well with the physical lumps and bumps of life. Even though we dislike them, we bear our falls, illnesses, broken bones, surgeries and the like with relative grace. However, when it comes to psychological hurts, like disapproval or rejection, we often behave like frightened children, or we seal ourselves away in isolation.

Now, on an intellectual level, we all know we can’t go through life without periodic disapproval or rejection. But the time when rejection’s sting becomes unbearable is when it joins our own self-rejection. Surely, closeness means hurt from time to time, but the hurt is less deep and less lasting when you basically affirm yourself.

This is why it is so important for us to behave in ways that build our self-image and self-esteem. It is also why our relationships improve when we begin to feel better about ourselves. Others see us respecting ourselves, and their respect for us increases as well. Inner confidence goes up, and we allow ourselves to give more, and receive more in return from our relationships.

To be fully alive is to be willing to risk pain and failure. To enter into a close relationship is to make one’s true self vulnerable. But, if we don’t take these risks, the alternative is loneliness and isolation, and a life half-lived. It is in our relationships that we are able to increase our inner well-being, balancing out some of the stresses of everyday living. When we can spread out the load with the help of others, the load gets lighter and easier to manage.

So, if your goal is to enjoy happier, more fulfilling relationships with others, first give some attention to the relationship you have with yourself. It is the foundation upon which we all build our relationships with others. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Construction Contractors Board Reveals Unlicensed Portland Area Contractor Activity

CCB reminds homeowners to check the license before hiring a contractor

A Construction Contractors Board (CCB) sweep of the Portland area revealed contractor violations including 15 instances of working without a license, 15 workers’ compensation-related violations, 10 lead-based paint violations and a variety of other violations. The sweep was conducted August 5th through the 11th. Altogether, 56 violations were discovered and 186 active job sites were checked.

By law, nearly everyone who builds a home or alters a structure must be licensed by the Construction Contractors Board. Contractors who bid and perform work on homes built before 1978 must also have a lead-based paint renovation license.

 Why It’s Important to Hire Licensed Contractors

Licensed contractors carry insurance and a surety bond to protect homeowners when construction projects go wrong. For homeowners in dispute with licensed contractors, the Construction Contractors Board provides mediation services. These services can help both parties settle their differences outside court.

Homeowners who hire unlicensed contractors have little recourse when a home improvement goes wrong. Some homeowners choose to go to court at their own expense, but many simply give up and hire a licensed contractor to repair the damage.

Check the License Online

Before signing a contract, the CCB encourages homeowners to check their contractor has an active license at http://search.ccb.state.or.us/search/. This site also provides up to 10 years of history on any contractor’s license.

Reporting Unlicensed Contractor Activity

The CCB regularly investigates tips about unlicensed contractors. Contractors and consumers can report unlicensed contractor activity by sending an email to ccbtips@state.or.us, or by visiting the CCB website at http://search.ccb.state.or.us/online_complaint_enf/.

Anyone with questions can call the Construction Contractors Board at 503-378-4621.

The CCB is the state agency licensing over 40,000 contractors. Anyone who is paid to repair, improve or build a home must be licensed. Learn more about how to have a successful project at www.oregon.gov/ccb


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Renewable Energy Hits the Wall

WATCH YOUR LANGUAGE! Hooked on mnemonics … for spelling

The Power of Believing That You Can Improve

Smithsonian: The Misguided Focus on 1619 as the Beginning of Slavery in the U.S. Damages Our Understanding of American History

Two Tour Guides—One Israeli, One Palestinian—Offer a New Way to See the Holy Land


 

Sherman County eNews #214

CONTENTS

  1. Exquisite Gorge Project: Steamroller Print Event at Maryhill Museum, Aug. 24

  2. Sherman County School District Hall of Honor, Oct. 19

  3. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

  4. Following the Rules

  5. PragerU’s Going to Court to Fight for Freedom of Speech in America

  6. Energy Facility Siting Council to Meet August 22-23 in Boardman

  7. Sherman County Fair Schedule, Aug. 20-24


1. Exquisite Gorge Project: Steamroller Print Event at Maryhill Museum, Aug. 24

Steamroller Print Event
Saturday, August 24 | NOON to 5 p.m.

Come join in the fun as we create a massive 60-foot woodblock print using a steamroller! This is the culmination of the Exquisite Gorge Project, a collaborative printmaking project featuring 11 artists working with communities along a 220-mile stretch of the Columbia River.

Artists worked with community members from their assigned stretch of river and carved images on 4 x 6 foot wood panels. Each completed panel will be connected end-to-end and printed using a steamroller to create a massive 60-foot print. Washington State Poet Laureate, Claudia Castro Luna, will be at Maryhill to create a poem commemorating the event and the Columbia River. Meet the artists at noon, then enjoy kids printmaking activities, music and more. Free on the grounds of Maryhill Museum of Art.

SCHEDULE of EVENTS:
12:00 P.M.
Meet the artists
McClain/Gamblin printmaking activity for kids and adults
Exquisite Corpse game for families
Artist Demonstrations
1:00 P.M.

Remarks and introductions
1:15 to 2:00 P.M.
First print pass/start will depend on the wind, ink, day
3:30 to 4:30 P.M.
Remarks and second print pass.


2. Sherman County School District Hall of Honor, Oct. 19

The Sherman County School District will be celebrating the induction of four individuals and one team into the Sherman County School District Hall of Honor at a reception in the Cafeteria that will begin at 5:30 p.m. on October 19, 2019.  There will also be a special presentation and celebration of 151 years of education in Sherman County (From One-Room Schools to One Campus). The Booster Club will be serving a Tri-Tip dinner between 5:30-6:15 p.m. and designated speakers will be sharing memories of each honoree beginning at 6:00 p.m. The public is welcome to join the celebration at 5:30 p.m. Please join us for the $12.00 fundraising dinner to support the Booster Club as we honor all Hall of Honor Inductees. Dinner tickets can be purchased at the door or you may attend the event for free if not purchasing dinner.

The 2019 inductees include United States Military Academy Graduate and Captain Deron R. Kaseberg; former State FFA President and OSU College of Agricultural Sciences Hall of Fame Member Michael S. Macnab; Teacher and State Champion Coach Ron Townsend; the first female Sherman County Superintendent Grace Zevely (posthumously); and the 1989 1A State Champion Football Team.

The purpose of the Hall of Honor is to formally recognize outstanding contributions to the heritage and tradition of the Sherman County School District.  It is the intent of this Hall of Honor to recognize and preserve the memory of students, teachers, athletes, teams, coaches, boosters, and others whose achievements and support have brought recognition and honor to the Sherman County School District.

For information regarding the Hall of Honor or to nominate a candidate for future induction, please visit http://www.shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com and click on the Hall of Honor tab.  For questions, email Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us.


3. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

Oregon.Flat.poleHere are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon news stories.

  • 19: Percent of Black Portland Public School third-graders who met state reading benchmarks in 2018, according to The Oregonian.
  • 34: Of Latinx third-graders who did.
  • 74: Of White Oregon third graders who did.
  • 1013: Senate Bill that narrows the state crimes that qualify for the death penalty. The change was not supposed to apply to pending cases, but a new interpretation by the state’s Department of Justice said this week that it did. Lawmakers want to revise the bill, possibly in a special session, OPB reports.
  • 21: Length, in feet, of a juvenile humpback whale stuck, then euthanized, near Waldport this week, according to The Register-Guard.
  • 50: Approximate number of community organizations at a Portland event led by the mayor to reject white supremacy this week ahead of an expected far-right demonstration in the city Aug. 17, according to OPB.
  • 8: Oregon legislators appointed to a committee to deal with replacing the I-5 bridge across the Columbia River to Washington state, according to The Columbian.
  • $3 billion: Cost of the failed Columbia River Crossing project, which tanked in 2013 after Washington backed out due to cost.
  • 9: Public employees suing the state over recent changes to the state’s retirement benefits.
  • 655: New e-scooters expected added to Portland’s fleet this week, according to Willamette Week.

4. Following the Rules

How often do you find yourself feeling irritated by things that other people do? If it is more often than you’d like, read on.

People who are easily irritated usually blame others for it. But to find the reason – and we are not talking about blame – these folks need to look inside themselves, instead of at those around them. Of course, irritability can have many causes, but one of the most common is having too many restrictive zones. In other words, too many rigid ideas and rules about right and wrong behavior.

These folks believe there is a right way to squeeze the toothpaste tube, a right way to load the dishwasher, a right way to do just about everything, and they have all the so-called “facts” to back them up. Now, the problem is not so much that they feel compelled to follow these restrictive and unnecessary rules themselves, but they have the same compulsion about other people following the “rules” as well!

Sometimes others go along with them, just to keep the peace and reduce their own stress. Often others will deliberately or unconsciously break these needless rules, just to drive the compulsive folks at bit “around the bend.” Passive aggressive? Yes, and in any type of community setting, whether it’s the workplace or someplace else, it is destructive to the overall culture.

It is important to become aware of the self-imposed rules we live by. We want to analyze why we have them, and whether or not they are helping us or not. Then we can get rid of those that keep us rigidly confined, for no important reason. It is also important that we refrain from imposing our personal standards on others.

Why spend our days stressed out and irritated, wondering why our relationships don’t work? We do need to take into account our own well-being, as well as that of those around us. So, relax! Loosen up a little! It’s a near-guarantee everyone will feel better for it. ~The Pacific Institute


5. PragerU’s Going to Court to Fight for Freedom of Speech in America

In just three short weeks, PragerU will head to court to fight for freedom of speech in America.

PragerU has a court date in our lawsuit against Google/YouTube scheduled for August 27th in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. The outcome of this case is critical, and it will determine whether Americans can continue to express their views freely online.

There is no doubt about it: Conservative values are under attack.

We are seeing an outright assault against conservatives by Big Tech. Not only are these companies using their algorithms to suppress accounts and content that present a conservative point of view, but they are also preventing millions of Americans from even seeing videos from PragerU.

Currently, over 100 of our videos are restricted by YouTube, and many others are demonetized on its platform. Even our videos on the 10 Commandments have been restricted!

Last month, Dennis Prager testified before the U.S. Senate on how Big Tech censorship is the greatest threat against free speech today. The hearing revealed how Big Tech companies have a long-running pattern of targeting conservatives.

This is why our lawsuit is so important. We are taking on the world’s two largest search engines: YouTube and Google. These two platforms control the content that billions of people see worldwide, and with that power, Google is using its platform to ban ideas and perpetuate the misinformation of the Left. We cannot — and will not — let that happen on our watch. ~Dennis Prager, PragerU.


6. Energy Facility Siting Council to Meet August 22-23 in Boardman

SALEM — Oregon’s Energy Facility Siting Council will meet next on August 22-23, 2019 in Boardman. The public meeting begins Thursday at 3 p.m. at the Port of Morrow Riverfront Center, 2 Marine Drive NE. The meeting resumes on Friday at 8:30 a.m.

The main items on the Council’s agenda:

  • Site Certificate Amendment Process Rulemaking: On August 1, 2019, the Oregon Supreme Court invalidated administrative rules the Council adopted in 2017 regarding its site certificate amendment process. At this meeting, the Council will consider adopting temporary rules to address the issues cited by the Supreme Court. For details, please see the Oregon Department of Energy’s staff report.
  • Wheatridge Wind Energy Facility (Morrow, Umatilla counties): Wheatridge is approved but not yet built. The Council will receive a presentation Thursday on the Draft Proposed Order on Request for Amendment 4 of the Wheatridge Wind Energy Facility site certificate and a public hearing will be conducted later in the day. The comment period extends through September 9, 2019. Request for Amendment 4 primarily seeks Council approval to add 1,527 acres to the approved site boundary within Morrow County for construction and operation of up to 150 megawatts of photovoltaic solar energy facility components, up to 41 distributed energy storage (battery) system sites and expansion of the Wheatridge West collector substation.
  • Perennial Wind Chaser Station (Umatilla County): Perennial is approved but not yet built. The Council will receive a presentation Thursday on the Draft Proposed Order on Request for Amendment 1 of the Perennial Wind Chaser Station site certificate and a public hearing will be conducted later in the day. Request for Amendment 1 seeks Council approval to extend the construction start and completion timelines by two years for the previously-approved 450-megawatt natural gas-fueled power generation facility and related or supporting facility components.

The full meeting agenda and materials are available on the ODOE website: www.oregon.gov/energy/facilities-safety/facilities/Pages/Council-Meetings.aspx. The next Council meeting is tentatively scheduled for September 26-27 in Clatskanie.


7. Sherman County Fair Schedule, Aug. 20-24 

2019 SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR SCHEDULE ~ 541-565-3510

www.shermancountyfairfun.com

Tuesday,  August 20

8:00 – 3:00 4-H Static Judging @ 4-H Pavilion

1:00 pm    4-H Horse Show (Showmanship followed by English, Western Equitation, Trail Horse & 4-H Gaming)

ARENA WILL BE CLOSED AFTER 4-H HORSE SHOW EVENT IS FINISHED

Wednesday , August 21

10:15 am                    Queen (2020) Applications due @ fair office

10:00 am-11                 All Beef Weigh-In

11:00 – 12:00 noon       All Turkey Weigh-In

11:00 am-6 pm             All Open Class Entries/Contests to be entered

1:00 pm-2 pm               All Swine  Weigh-In

2:00 – 3:00 pm             All Sheep & Goats Weigh In

3:30 pm                       Dale Coles Classic Car Show  Ck in

4:30 pm                       Long Horn show on Mid-Way

5:00 pm                       BBQ Burgers/Hot Dogs Cooked by Fair Board

5:10 pm                       Classic Car Show Awards

5:30 pm                       4-H style show

7:00 pm                       Cattle Sorting

Thursday, August  22

7:00 am – 9:00am    High School Sports Practice

TBA LONGHORN & MUTTIN BUSTIN SHOWS

8:00 am                       4-H Poultry, Rabbit & Cavie Show (market & showmanship)

8:30 am                       Final placement for all Open Class Baked Goods & Flowers

9:00 am                       Open Class Pavilion Judging starts

9:30 am                       4-H & FFA Records Books Due  (4-H Pavilion @ grounds)

9:50 am-10am              Showmanship Clinic (4-H & FFA)

10:00 am-11am            4-H & FFA Swine Market Judging, followed by Breeding Class

11:00 am-12:00            4-H & FFA Sheep Market Judging, followed by Breeding Class

12:30 pm-2:00 pm        4-H & FFA Goat Market Judging,

Followed by Breeding Class

2:00 pm-3:30 pm         4-H & FFA Beef Market Judging, followed by Breeding Class

7:00 pm                      Down on the Farm Chore Course

Friday, August 23

TBA LONGHORN & MUTTIN BUSTIN SHOWS

8:00 am                                    4-H Home Economics Contests @ 4-H Pavilion

ALL OPEN CLASS ANIMAL’S WILL SHOW AFTER THEIR SPECIFIC 4-H/FFA LIVESTOCK CLASSES.                  

RDO Breakfast time will be announced at beginning of fair week

8:00 am – 9:00             4-H & FFA Swine Showmanship (SR./INT/JR)                

9:15am-10:45 am          4-H & FFA Goat Showmanship (SR./INT/JR)

11:00-12:00pm             4-H & FFA Sheep Showmanship (SR./INT/JR)

12:15 pm-1:30 pm        4-H & FFA Beef Showmanship (SR./INT/JR)

2:30 pm                        Livestock Judging Contest                                 

7:15 pm –                     Special intros In Rodeo Arena

7:30-9:30 pm                CCT Bull Riding

Saturday August 24

TBA LONGHORN & MUTTIN BUSTIN SHOWS

8:30 am                     Horse & KIDS Games @ main rodeo Arena

9:00 am                       Premium Payouts @ Fair Office

10:00 am                      Queen’s Reception @ grounds

12:30 pm                      4-H Grand Champion All Around Showmanship Contest

4-H/FFA awards will follow all-around

3:00pm- 4:00 pm          4-H & FFA Livestock sale

TBA                              FFA ANNUAL BBQ MEAL           

 6:30pm                        Derby Check in

7:30 pm –                    Demo Derby

9:30 pm -1:00 am         Dance with “Countryfied”

 Sunday, August 25 >>> NO PUBLIC EVENTS TO SEE >>> 

8:30 am                       Finish of all barn and building clean-up & picking up of exhibits

9:30am                        All Premium Payouts @ fair office

12:00 noon           ALL FAIR EXHBITS GONE AND THE FAIR IS CLOSED

LIVESTOCK EXHIBTS RELEASED AT BARN SUPERINDENDENTS DECISION ## ON SUNDAY

Sale Animals load out time will be posted at fair

****DENOTES APPROXIMATE TIME****

>>> SCHEDULE IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE<<<<<